More Camera Trap photographs from the INGWE Team

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Transcript of More Camera Trap photographs from the INGWE Team

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    LeopardsOur main focus is

    leopard research onthe Thaba Tholo

    Wilderness Reserve

    Page 3

    PredatorsSome camera trappictures of other

    predators, capturedon our cameras

    Page 4

    Other animalsWith such abundant

    Wildlife on thereserve our cameraspick up much more.

    Page 5&6

    INGWE Leopard ResearchPart 2 - Camera Trap Pictures

    By Will Fox

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    Leopards

    Camera Tra sWe have been using camera traps for over tenyears to monitor Leopard movement andbehavior. We build up ID kits for every leopardthat we capture on camera. Each ID kit includesas many photographs as possible, plus themeasurements and castings of their spoor.Using those ID kits as a baseline record we canaccurately recognize any individual insubsequent pictures or spoor sightings, in orderthat we can build up a picture of that individualsbehavior.

    A

    B

    C

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    Everyone isdifferent

    The spot patterns andfoot print of everyleopard is different.This helps us toidentify individuals

    Our CameraTrap HistoryIn the early days we

    used home madecamera traps that werea normal point andshoot camera hookedup to a PIR detectorfrom a domesticburglar alarm and a bigbattery all housed in anelectrical junction box.

    In 2007 we startedexperimenting with thetrails cameras thatwere commerciallyavailable in the USA.After much trial anderror we found the bestoptions for us is quicktrigger speed and lowpower usage. Triggerspeed is the key toensure we capture apassing leopard.

    We have found the bestcameras for ourresearch, which

    combine fast triggerspeed, with low powerusage and low cost.Members of ourcamera club buy thesenew cameras to helpour research, as wellreceiving photos fromtheir camera.

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    B: Honey BadgerOur cameras pick up HoneyBadgers on a regular basis. Youcant help but love thesetenacious creatures. This oneclimbing in a tree to steel aleopards kill

    C: ServalWe are starting to see moreServal on our camera traps thenin previous years.

    E: GenetAnother regular, that we pick upon camera traps.

    F: CaracalWe see Caracal spoor more thanactually photograph them. Thatmay be because they are stayingaway from leopards.

    A: Cape FoxThe Cape Fox is not normallyfound in our research zone. Thisrare photo is the first and onlywe have ever had of a Cape Fox

    D: Brown HyenaAnother of the large predatorswe find in our research area. Weseldom have a visual of abrownie, but do see their spoorquite often.

    A B C

    D E F

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    B: AardvarkHardly ever seen but they docrop up on camera traps fromtime to time.

    C: ImpalaAbundant across South Africa,they are a staple diet for ourLeopards and Caracal.

    E: Wart HogVery popular with leopards.

    F: NyalaOur research area is not thenormal habitat for Nyala butthey seem to do well, eventhough they are leopard prey.

    A: KuduWe have a large population ofKudu on the Thaba TholoWilderness Reserve. Adults arenormally too large for a leopardto take, unlike their claves.

    D: Bush PigTenacious nocturnal visitors thatare often photographed on aleopard kill.

    A B C

    D E F

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    B: Spring HareSnack for a young leopard

    C: PorcupineLeopards tend to favour easierprey, but we have had leopardstake Porcupine.

    E: Blue WildebeestSome say they were put togetherby committee.

    F: Mellars MongooseA rare photograph of a MellarsMongoose.

    A: ZebraAs with Kudu the adults are toobig for a leopard to normallytake. But again the calves arevulnerable.

    D: BaboonWe have some very large troopsof Baboons. Although we havehad one or two leopards thatspecialized in Baboons kills,those have been the exception tothe rule.

    A B C

    D E F

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    Will Fox is Chairman on PAW Conservation Trustand CEO of On Track Safaris.

    Will has been contributing to Leopard Conservationsince 2004 and as chairman of PAW is particularlyinvolved with INGWE Leopard Research.

    With his wife Carol, Will formed On Track safaris in2007 to support Leopard Research and provide aunique Safari experience for visitors to SouthAfrica.

    www.ontracksafaris.co.uk