SHIFT mag [n°8] - Knowledge, research and society

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What place do knowledge and research hold in our society? Are we getting any closer to becoming the most competitive knowledge-based economy in the world? In this issue we talk about success stories like Erasmus, and cases where the jury is still out like Europeana. About the daily life of a laboratory worker and the struggle to open access to scientific publications. And much more...

Transcript of SHIFT mag [n°8] - Knowledge, research and society

  • Knowledge, research and society

    EUROPETALKS

    TO BRUSSELS

    080808 12 14

    1012 2008

    n8

    M

    i Ran

    CO

    LLIN

  • CONTENT> 04

    Open access:the new paradigm of scientifi c publishing

    > 06

    Moving along: end of the lineor pit stop?

    08 >

    Lab Scene Investigation

    11 >

    PostScript

    18 >

    If you cant beat them, join them!

    COMING UP SOON THE

    NEW SHIFTMAG WEBSITE! www.shiftmag.eu

    EUROPE TALKS TO BRUSSELS

    React and take part in the debate

    Discover exclusive online features

    Get SHIFT Mag articles online

    Explore our european web selection

    After 2 years of online presence, www.shiftmag.eu is entering a new era.

    The new version of the site will be launched in early 2009 with an original new layout and exclusive content.

    Chek it out at www.shiftmag.eu

    F O R I N F O R M AT I O N O N A D V E R T I S I N G I N S H I F T M A G , CONTACT ANDRES BELLEMANS ([email protected]) FLORENCE ORTMANS ([email protected])

    > 20

    The Clash:Europeana

    16 >

    Reservoir Blogs

    > 14

    Boost your Erasmus, get involved

    >12

    ShiftingwithPaul Magnette

    22 >

    NewSHIFT Mag

    website

  • > 06

    Moving along: end of the lineor pit stop?

    03 N 8 > SHIFTmag

    Knowledge, research and society

    EUROPETALKS

    TO BRUSSELS

    080808 12 14

    1012 2008

    n8

    M

    i Ran

    CO

    LLIN

    Victor FleurotSHIFT MagEditorBrussels

    EDITORIAL

    SHIFT MagEUROPE TALKS TO BRUSSELSAvenue de Tervueren 2701150 Brussels Belgiumwww.shiftmag.eu

    Publisher: Juan [email protected]

    Editor: Victor FLEUROT T. +32 2 235 56 [email protected]

    Deputy Editor: David MARQUIE T. +32 2 235 56 [email protected]

    Contributors to this issue: Bernard RENTIER (Liege), Tiago OUTEIRO (Lisbon), Laurence VAN MELDEREN (Brussels), Laurent VAN BRUSSEL (Brussels), Adriano FARANO (Paris), Frdric DARMUZEY (Brussels), Kris OLDS (Madison, USA), Victor FLEUROT (Brussels), David MARQUIE (Brussels)

    Illustrations: Roberto TRIOSCHI, Mi Ran COLLIN, Franois TACOEN, Laurent VAN BRUSSEL, Christophe WANLIN, Wim TACITURN, Emmanuel TRPANT, Brieuc HUBIN

    Photography: Mauricio LIMA/AFP PHOTO, cabinet de M. Paul MAGNETTE

    Special thanks to Maria GALLO URRUTIA for linguistic coordination and Sline YAVUZ for editorial support

    Production & coordination: Nadine SCHWIRTZ [email protected]

    Design & Graphics: Tipik Studio

    Printed by: Van Ruys, Brussels

    Administration & subscription: Ricardo DA SILVA RIBEIRO T. + 32.2.235.56.05 [email protected]

    To advertise in SHIFT Mag contact: Florence ORTMANS [email protected] T.+32 2 235 56 46Andres BELLEMANS [email protected] T. +32 2 235 00 41

    SHIFT Mag 2008

    Paradigms shift. SHIFT paradigms. In its eighth issue dedicated to knowledge, research and society in Europe, the magazine is still striving to fi nd a fresh angle on the issues that shake up our continent. Light-hearted wit and serious analysis mix to create a colourful picture of the given theme.

    This time we look at knowledge and research in Europe. What place do they hold in our society? Are we getting any closer to becoming the most competitive knowledge-based economy in the world?

    In this issue, we talk about success stories like Erasmus, and cases where the jury is still out like Europeana. About the daily life of a laboratory worker and the struggle for open access to scientifi c publications. We also have a Belgian minister and former EU constitutionalist sharing his views on knowledge and expertise in politics. And, as always, the unidentifi ed PostScript and explosive Reservoir Blogs.

    Quite a lot to chew! But the festive break will help you digest our latest serving. We hope youll be fully recharged and on the deck for the launch of our new website in the new year.

    In the meantime, enjoy the end of 2008 and the annual circus that fi lls the winters longer nights. We promise well be back next year with more of the same and more!

    Enjoy the issue and drop us a line at www.shiftmag.eu

    Tipik Communication A SWORD Group Company.Avenue de Tervueren 270 1150 Brussels Belgium.

    Free quarterly publication (cannot be sold). Published by Tipik Communication. Reproduction in any form is prohibited without prior consent. The views expressed by contributors are their own and do not necessarily represent those of SHIFT Mag.

  • OPEN ACCESSTHE NEW PARADIGM OF SCIENTIFIC PUBLISHING

    K N O W LE D G E , R E S E A R C H A N D S O C I E T Y

    SHIFTmag > N 8 04

    Is a revolution in access to knowledge underway? Is the availability of abundant, easily accessible digital information, mainly on the internet, becoming the new paradigm, breaking the monopoly of paper? With Web 2.0, the context is changing considerably, and it is clear that these are crucial times for our relationship to information, knowledge and, ultimately, the world.

    The business models on which information industries are based are seeking a new path between dissemination objectives and media profitability. The current economic and financial crisis, but also the environmental crisis, are raising the stakes and could precipitate the switch to new models for developing and accessing information.

    From this perspective, the world of research may have been pointing the way for some years. Indeed, the issues underlying free access to scientific information, magnified by the growing impact of the internet, exemplify the challenges which all stakeholders in the areas of information and publishing

    are now facing. Therefore, it is worth explaining the debate that is increasingly stirring up and mobilising the research community today: open access to scientific publications.

    Reclaiming control of the dissemination process

    The movement began about fifteen years ago as a reaction of research institutions and universities to increasingly exorbitant, unaffordable subscription fees for scientific journals, the main vectors for the dissemination of scientific research results. In the various disciplines, these costs have doubled, or more frequently tripled, over the last 15 years, without any particular justification and far beyond the rise in the price index (around 30%).

    The first to sound the alarm were, logically, those in charge of documentation centres. But awareness of this issue has grown, with more and more staff at universities and research institutions keen to find ways of avoiding the profit above all policies of the largest scientific publishers.

    The movement in favour of open access offers researchers themselves a way of reclaiming control of the process of disseminating their own scientific output. Indeed, it is through selling this knowledge, generally produced through public funding, that the publishers of scientific journals make their profits; none of those profits make their way back to the authors (researchers), and their intellectual property rights are flouted.

    Golden road and green road

    However, the internet revolution is bringing about a change in this situation.

    Researchers, who were initially sceptical or suspicious (traditional publication in prestigious journals guarantees international recognition of their work), are becoming increasingly convinced by the alternatives offered by electronic publishing.

    In 2001, the most active players in this field started the Budapest Open Access Initiative (BOAI) and launched a huge information and awareness-raising campaign, targeting scientific communities throughout the world. The signatories, which now total several thousands (researchers, universities, governments, research funding bodies, etc.), are committed to promoting the development of two new publication strategies: auto-archiving in online institutional repositories and direct publication in open access journals.

    This second strategy is the golden road, the ideal way, for it creates new journals, often on the initiative of researchers, or encourages old journals to change their business model. The first strategy, referred to as the green road, is a compromise that makes it possible to protect the respective rights of researchers and publishers, while ensuring maximum visibility of scientific data thanks to the interoperability of the databases created.

    Wider, quicker and more democratic dissemination

    It is estimated that 20% of scientific literature worldwide is now available through Open Access, 15% via the green road and 5% via the golden road. And this trend is growing. In this area, the University of Lige is successfully

    T O F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T T H E O R I G I N S A N D E T H O S O F O P E N A C C E S S A N D T H E I N I T I A T I V E S O F T H E U N I V E R S I T Y O F L I G E I N T H I S F I E L D :

    http://www.soros.org/openaccess/index.shtmlhttp://www.ulg.ac.be/cms/c_17700/open-access

  • 05 N 8 > SHIFTmag

    EUROPE TALKS TO BRUSSELS

    The movement in favour of open access off ers researchers themselves a way of reclaiming control of the process of disseminating their own scientifi c output.

    increasing its initiatives and is playing a pioneering role in Belgium and Europe.

    The Open Access model is particularly well-adapted to the interests and objectives of researchers, as it allows for wider, quicker, more effective and more democratic dissemination of the knowledge that they produce. The advantages are also obvious for universities and all (public and private) research funders, which benefi