MASTER SYLLABUS HOSP 340: Beverage Evaluation SYLLABUS HOSP 340: Beverage Evaluation Management 1....

download MASTER SYLLABUS HOSP 340: Beverage Evaluation SYLLABUS HOSP 340: Beverage Evaluation Management 1. ... merchandising, beverage ... Implement an effectively written beverage menu that

of 14

  • date post

    11-Mar-2018
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    221
  • download

    6

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of MASTER SYLLABUS HOSP 340: Beverage Evaluation SYLLABUS HOSP 340: Beverage Evaluation Management 1....

  • MASTER SYLLABUS HOSP 340: Beverage Evaluation & Management

    1. Course Details

    Semester: Course Code: HOSP 340 Course Name: Beverage Evaluation & Management

    Course Prerequisites: HOSP 100, HOSP 140 Course Co-requisites: HOSP 240 Credits Hours: Three (3) credit hours Classroom: Class Timing: 45 credit hours Final Exam Period:

    2. Catalog Course Description

    Comprehensive study of the origins, production, characteristics and flavor profiles of wine, malted beverages, and distilled spirits. Other areas that will be explored include purchasing beverages, merchandising, beverage control, alcohol physiology, legal regulation, and responsible service.

    3. Course Overview

    The student will learn about production methods, legal regulations, and taste distinctions among wines, malted beverages, and distilled spirits. History and cultural significance of each style of libation will be covered in detail. The effect of alcohol on the body will be reviewed. The student will also learn how to market alcoholic beverages in a hospitality operation and pair wines, malted beverages and distilled spirits with various styles of cuisine to promote in hospitality operations.

    4. Course-Level Learning Goals1 (A) Invariant Learning Goals (In support of the BPS Programmatic Learning Goal(s))2:

    1 A note on School of Management Course-Level Learning Goals: Learning goals are partitioned into those that are in support of the programmatic learning goals (Invariant), specific to globalization (Contextualized), and specific to the domain expertise of the instructor (Instructor-Specific). The former two categories are required for all courses. Invariant Assurance of Learning Validations are specifically linked to the associated programmatic learning goal and objective, with course-level learning goals representing the programmatic goal as it applies to the context of the course. Learning goals that focus on knowledge acquisition (Blooms Taxonomy) are not specifically or necessarily included into the course-level learning goals, although it is assumed that knowledge acquisition of all relevant business core fundamentals is addressed within each course. Examinations in class are used to provide feedback concerning knowledge and comprehension for the purpose of ensuring that students who have not mastered these will not advance through the curriculum. Attainment of knowledge within each core area is assessed by way of standalone testing of each student as a required part of the instructional program prior to graduation (e.g. ETS).

  • Upon the successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Utilize demographic research and apply the promotion of alcoholic beverage flavor profiles to a

    specific market (A1-a); 2. Characterize various styles of cuisine and identify how specific foods pair with wines, malted

    beverages, and distilled spirits for a specific hospitality concept (A1-b); 3. Implement an effectively written beverage menu that is descriptive and appealing to a target

    guest (A1-c); 4. Summarize legal vulnerability related to the service of alcohol and present written policies for

    responsible service by a hospitality service staff (A1-d); and 5. Select beverage products appropriate to a concept and draft product knowledge information to

    be integrated into beverage service standards and staff training (A1-e).

    2 The degree of attainment for each course level learning goal is validated through the composite set of scores for the referenced Assurance of Learning Validations for that goal. For example, if a learning goal is followed by (A1), it implies that the average of the set of scores for Assurance of Learning Validation A1 forms the basis of assessment/attainment of the learning goal. Alternatively, if a learning goal is followed by (A3; A4; A6), this indicates that the composite set of scores for Assurance of Learning Validations A3, A4 and A6 are to be used to assess the degree to which this learning goal has been attained with equal weights applied to each set of scores. That is, the average of the scores for A3 is utilized and weighted equally (1/3) with the average for the scores of A4, and also A6. Unless specified otherwise, the weights are equal. In the latter case the weight for each Assurance of Learning Validation would be 1/3.

  • Assurance of Learning Validations (Linked to the BPS Programmatic Learning Goals)3: A1. Capstone Project: Each student submits a project focused on the design of a comprehensive

    beverage marketing program for a hospitality operation. Section 1. Student performs a demographic analysis on the target market of an existing hospitality operation. Student discusses the current clientele of the operation, along with what demographic make-up of the area shows, based on the concept of the operation. Section 2. Student creates a beverage list, including wine, malted beverages and spirits. Mixed cocktails should be included, appropriate to the concept. Each style of alcoholic beverage (no fewer than 12 wines, 12 malted beverages and 18 spirits) may be broken out into separate lists, or all listed on one beverage menu. Wines should be presented in body order, by category (red, white, sparkling). All listings must include flavor profile descriptions and accompanying food pairing suggestions (related to the food menu of the operation). Section 3. Student drafts product knowledge information for the beverage list that can be integrated into an employee training manual. Information for each product on the beverage list should be included, along with appropriate sales dialogue (beverage profiles to be included: Vodka, Gin, Rum, Irish Whiskey, American Whiskey, Scotch Whisky, Canadian Whisky, Tequila, three liqueurs, primary malted beverage styles, primary wine grape varietals, assigned wine regions). A policy on the responsible service of alcohol must be included.

    Scores will be administered (for each student) based on the ability to: a. Apply demographic research to a hospitality concept that promotes alcoholic beverages at a

    price point and style of presentation that is marketable, a reflection of current industry trends, and of interest to the target market (M3-O6);

    b. Apply appropriate food pairings to wines, malted beverages, and distilled spirits within a hospitality marketplace and for a specific demographic (M5-O1);

    c. Create a beverage marketing program featuring a comprehensive menu of wine, malted beverages, and distilled spirits that is presented with descriptive verbiage for each item offered (M6-O2);

    d. Draft an employee policy to ensure the responsible service of alcohol (M1-O1); and

    3 A note on School of Management Assurance of Learning Scoring: Scores form the metric for the degree to which the validation (e.g. learning outcome) satisfies the associated learning goal or objective. Assurance of learning validation descriptions identify the criteria for each score that is to be given. All scores are scaled from 1-5 (1-poor, 2-fair, 3-good, 4-very good, 5-excellent). It must be noted that scores are to be differentiated from grades. Scores form a criterion from which an instructor will ascertain an overall grade for any instrument of assessment, and the overall assessment the student receives for an instrument is a grade. A score is an extraction that specifically measures the degree of attainment of a learning goal and/or objective.

  • e. Draft product knowledge information, including history, production methods, and flavor profiles for wines, malted beverages, and distilled spirits, that can be integrated into an employee training and development program (M3-O5).

    (B) Contextualized (Globalized) Learning Goal(s): Upon the successful completion of this course, the student will be able to: 1. Demonstrate the differences in production and flavor between beverages produced the

    United States, versus the same assigned beverage styles produced in other countries (B1-a).

    Assurance of Learning Validation (In support of the Contextualized (Globalized) Learning Goal(s): B1. As an element of the Capstone Project, each student provides an analysis of production

    techniques and flavor profiles of assigned beverages (whiskey vs. whisky and sparkling wine vs. champagne) that are similar products, but produced in different parts of the world.

    Score will be administered (for each student) based on the ability to: a. Identify key distinctions between assigned beverages that can be utilized and integrated as a

    component of staff training and development (M6-O6).

    (C) Instructor Specific Learning Goal(s) (Optional):

    None. Assurance of Learning Validation (In support of the Instructor Specific Learning Goal(s)):

    None.

    5. Teaching and Learning Methodology The School of Managements teaching and learning strategy is informed by contemporary indicators/sources that derive from its target market, specifically the millennial generation. In particular, behavioral traits for this generation are identified and form the basis of emphasis for the schools teaching and learning methodologies. These methodologies are reflected in the schools mission statement by way of its TEMPOS campaign4. In addition, teaching and learning strategies are informed by institutional indirect assessment results, periodically collected and reviewed by the Office of Planning and Assessment and the schools faculty5. Teaching and le