Discuss each statement Big Ideas Essential Growth mindset and positive self-concept (Fixed mindset...

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  • Exceeding Expectations: Instruction and Intervention Systems Behavioral RTI

    Chris Weber, Ed.D. Senior Fellow

    1

    “The single greatest lesson from past ultra-achievers is not how easily things came to them, but how irrepressible and resilient they were.”

    David Shenk

    “Behavior is a form of communication providing clues about what is missing in a young person’s life.”

    John Seita

    Discuss each statement…

    1. It is parents’ and society’s job to teach students to behave; our job is to teach academics. 2. Behavioral and academic successes, or lack of successes, are inextricably linked. 3. A lack of consistency and positive modeling among staff significantly contributes to

    students’ difficulties with behavior. 4. You cannot teach someone to care or be motivated.

    Big Ideas

    • We can and must teach behaviors, habits, attributes, skills, and dispositions that we want emerging scholars, citizens, and people to exhibit.

    • Behavior must be consistently defined, modeled, and reinforced by all staff, at all times.

    Essential Questions • How can we best teach expected and appropriate behaviors?

    • How do we define expected and appropriate behaviors?

    • How can we acknowledge and reinforce expected and appropriate behaviors?

  • Exceeding Expectations: Instruction and Intervention Systems Behavioral RTI

    Chris Weber, Ed.D. Senior Fellow

    2

    Implementation of Instruction and Intervention Systems focused on nurturing behaviors aims to achieve and enable self-regulated learning, social emotional learning, and a proactive and positive approach to all students developing the attributes required to succeed in school and in life. Research shows: • Behaviors occur everywhere, at all times requiring consistent, collaborative approaches • We must explicitly model the behaviors that staff want to see from students • Better staff/student relationships = Better student behaviors • Engaging, well-designed lessons within well-organized, predictable environments =

    Better student behavior • To see changes in student behaviors, we must adapt adult behaviors.

    Changes we can make to adult practices within schools: • Build in rewarding opportunities for social interaction. • Provide audiences for student work. • Connect academic requirements to real world situations. • Offer students meaningful choice. • Minimize pressures on students such as competition or social comparison • Recognize and reinforce a growth mindset and value-added learning. • Revise the grading system. • Provide timely and specific corrective feedback. • Explore, with staff and students, the following “equation”

    𝐵𝑒ℎ𝑎𝑣𝑖𝑜𝑟 =   𝐷𝑟𝑖𝑣𝑒  𝑥  𝐻𝑎𝑏𝑖𝑡 𝐴𝑛𝑥𝑖𝑒𝑡𝑦

    • Set, revise, and reflect upon progress toward well-defined, long-term goals and the short- term goals need to reach them.

    • Establish and communicate high expectations. • Celebrate successes and short-term wins. • Encourage and develop self-advocacy. • Model and reinforce that fact that effort and ability can be–should be–directly related. • Teach and allow students to practice metacognition. • Teach and allow students to practice monitoring their learning. • Teach and allow students to practice high-leverage learning strategy. • Teach and allow students to practice techniques for managing time, resources,

    attention, and their environment so that volition, grit, and perseverance remain strong. • Teach the principles of self-efficacy and self-concept.

  • Exceeding Expectations: Instruction and Intervention Systems Behavioral RTI

    Chris Weber, Ed.D. Senior Fellow

    3

    Follow the process below when initiating Behavioral RTI: WHO will take the lead on Behavioral RTI? WHAT supports are needed to ensure that the Principal (and team) define, communicate, and support in the areas of:

    Survey the culture expectations, readiness, strengths, and needs of staff and stakeholders (p. 5) Tier 1

    Content Instruction Assessment Feedback • Social and academic

    behaviors • 21st century skills • College and career

    readiness skills • Self-regulation • Executive

    functioning • Learning and life

    strategies

    • Schoolwide instruction • Tier 1 differentiation • Behavioral instruction

    within academics • Classroom meetings &

    restorative justice circles

    • Consistent classroom management, routines, procedures, and expectations

    • Evidence gathering • Observation guides • Behavior documentation

    forms • Student conferences • Student self-

    assessments • Walk-through protocols

    • Reinforcing the positive

    • Correcting and pre- correct

    • De-escalating • 3 Rs – Reflection,

    Reteaching, Restitution

    Behavior screening Tier 2 Tier 3 Assessment Strategies • For Tier 1

    differentiation • For Tier 3

    interventions • Formal behavior

    screeners o SRSS / SIBSS

    • Behavior screening template

    • General diagnostic interview

    • Specific diagnostic interviews

    • Monitoring and mentoring using CICO

    • Target behavior(s) • Re-teach • Specify pre-corrections • Specify de-escalation

    strategies • Target strategies • Teach student strategies • Support staff

    • Formal Functional Behavior Analysis (FBA)

    • Formal Behavior Intervention Plan (BIP)

    WHEN will the Principal (and team) support behaviors?

    • When will the team provide consistent professional development? • When will the team provide information to teacher teams? • When will the team meet to determine the needs of students at-risk behaviorally? • When will the team support students at-risk behaviorally?

    HOW will teams communicate with school staff regarding students in need of additional behavioral supports?

    HOW WILL THE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL ENSURE THAT THESE TASKS ARE COMPLETED SYSTEMATICALLY AND SUCCESSFULLY?

  • Exceeding Expectations: Instruction and Intervention Systems Behavioral RTI

    Chris Weber, Ed.D. Senior Fellow

    4

    Survey Expectations, Readiness, Strengths, and Needs of Staff and Stakeholders

    List and describe the behavioral expectations for students across the school:

    Please Respond with a 1-4 to each of the statements below 4 = Strongly Agree 3 = Somewhat Agree 2 = Somewhat Disagree 1 = Strongly Disagree

    Staff (teachers, yard duty, office staff, cafeteria workers, etc.) know the schoolwide expectations?

    Staff accepts collective responsibility for defining and teaching behavioral expectations

    Staff consistently teaches, models, and reinforces behavioral expectations.

    Staff intentionally fosters and nurtures positive relationships with all students.

    Students know the schoolwide expectations. Parents know the schoolwide expectations. Follow-through on behavioral infractions is timely. Follow-through on behavioral infractions is clearly communicated. Behavioral deficits are viewed in the same manner as reading deficits – students lack skills and require supplemental supports.

    After an incident, students are retaught, asked to reflect, and guided toward restitution, in addition to receiving consequences.

    Classroom environment promote positive behaviors. Lesson designs and topics promote positive behaviors. Staff teaches the schoolwide expectations to students. Staff models schoolwide expectations to students. Staff recognizes students for displaying desired behaviors more often than they reprimand students for undesired behaviors.

    Staff agree on what type of problem behaviors to refer to the office.

    Staff understands and utilizes the steps to provide students with more intensive behavioral supports.

    The school uses evidence for making decisions in designing, implementing, and revising behavioral efforts.

    The school regularly and efficiently collects evidence of student learning of behavioral expectations.

    Behavior is a focus of schoolwide collaboration discussions and professional development.

  • Exceeding Expectations: Instruction and Intervention Systems Behavioral RTI

    Chris Weber, Ed.D. Senior Fellow

    5

    Behavior Screening

    Student Risk Screening Scale (SRSS) and Student Internalizing Behavior Screening Scale (SIBSS)

    Teacher name:

    0 = Never

    For the SRSS and SIBBS separately

    9–21 indicates high risk.

    1 = Occasionally 4–8 indicates moderate risk.

    2 = Sometimes 0–3 indicates low risk.

    3 = Frequently

    Use the above scale to rate each item for each student.

    Student Risk Screening Scale (SRSS)

    Externalizing Behaviors Student Internalizing Behavior Screening Scale (SIBSS) Internalizing

    Behaviors

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