August 1972 25p

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  • August 1972 25p

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    SURVEY:

    AUDIO MIXERS

    RES 42 A REPORT FROM

    LOS ANGELES

    A SYNCHRONISED

    TAPE SPEED

    CONTROL SYSTEM

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    www.americanradiohistory.com

    www.americanradiohistory.com

  • Loudspeakers for the Perfectionist

    P14444 ,&xeseKt rite 7cdgeioad Celestion

    DITTON SERIES

    DITTON 66 STUDIO MONITOR

    Represents the ultimate that modern loudspeaker technology has to dffier.

    Left to Right: Ditton 10 Mark I I, Ditton 120, Ditton 15, Ditton 44, Ditton 25.

    High Quality - Low Price! Employs HF1300 and 8" Bass Unit. Housed in very attractive cabinet.

    Celestion Write for details of Celestion sound equipment ROLA CELESTION LIMITED DITTON WORKS, FOXHALL ROAD, IPSWICH, SUFFOLK

    www.americanradiohistory.com

    www.americanradiohistory.com

  • l FEATURES studio sound 21 A NOVEL QUADRANT FADER By M. G. Skeet INCORPORATING TAPE RECORDER

    31 AES 42 -A REPORT FROM LOS ANGELES By Stephen Lamphen

    37 DESIGNING A TRANSPORTABLE MIXER AUGUST 1972 VOLUME 14 NUMBER 8 By Julian Vereker

    41 SURVEY: AUDIO MIXERS EDITOR DAVID KIRK

    59 SOUND IN THE THEATRE Part Two

    ASSISTANT EDITOR JOHN DWYER By Keith Wicks 61 SYNCHRONOUS TAPE RECORDING SYSTEM

    CONSULTING EDITOR JOHN CRABBE By Dr. J. A. Archer -Hall

    AUDIO GROUP ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER ROBIN WELLS

    ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER TONY NEWMAN

    Editorial and Advertising Offices: LINK HOUSE, DINGWALL AVENUE, CROYDON CR9 2TA. Telephone: 01 -686 2599 Link House Publications Ltd 1972. All rights reserved.

    LAST MONTH in this column we referred to the compact cassette as being a joke, a view we still hold. This comment provoked an unexpected reaction from a reader who telephoned his whole -hearted agreement. Not from him, however, the usual stories of wow, dropout, squeaking and jamming. He had purchased a disc album only to find the quality well below the Pop average. Reading the sleeve notes he learned that the recording had been mastered on a cassette 'because it was live'. Live that is, before the cassette took hold of it.

    Perhaps we are out of touch but we simply didn't believe him. So we bought a copy and, sure enough, found it had been mastered on an Ampex stereo cassette recorder. While accepting that modern equipment can give passable 4.75 cm /s results by domestic not -so -hi fi standards, what possible excuse can be made for mastering at so low a speed, particularly in combina- tion with the narrow track width of a cassette. Under tightly controlled conditions (carefully chosen and adjusted machine, selected cassette, meticulously cleaned heads, Dolby A), it is possible that a reasonable disc could result. But this is stretching equipment and operators to their limits. Why not take advantage of similar improvements in 38 cm /s performance? These have been less dramatic, admittedly, but only because the medium has been a good one from pre -BTR2 days. The compact cassette was developed as a domestic system. Philip's initial attempts to compete Musicassettes against gramophone records were greeted with amusement from the trade. Today, after seven years, the disc is still a long way from dead. Our fear is that cassette mastering may become more than an isolated gimmick (in the disc in question, it was not presented as anything other than normal practice). If it acquires respectability, and if cassette recorders receive the casual treatment accorded to more conventional equipment, the result will be a long stride back towards the telephonic qualities of the seventy -eight.

    COLUMNS

    11 PRECIS

    12 NEWS

    14 PATENTS

    19 LETTERS

    23 BOOK REVIEWS By Roderick Snell

    25 DIARY By Keith Wicks

    29 AROUND THE STUDIOS By Adrian Hope

    COVER

    One of a series of illustrations from the Gabinetto Armonico by Filippo Bonanni, published in 1723. This engraving represents King David (no relation), to whom the work was dedicated. The Gabinetto Armonico has been reprinted by Dover Publications and provides a useful guide to contemporary instruments.

    CORRESPONDENCE AND ARTICLES

    All STUDIO SOUND correspondence should be sent to the address printed on this page. Technical queries should be concise and must include a stamped addressed envelope. Matters relating to more than one department should occupy separate sheets of paper or delay will occur in replying.

    Articles or suggestions for features on all aspects of communications engineering and music will be received sympathetically. Manuscripts should be typed or clearly handwritten and submitted with rough drawings when appropriate. We are happy to advise potential authors on matters of style. Payment is negotiated on acceptance.

    SUBSCRIPTION RATES

    Annual UK subscription rate for STUDIO SOUND is 3(overseas 3.80, $8 or equivalent). Our associate publication Hi -Fi News costs 3.24 (overseas 3.66, $8.64 or equivalent). Six monthly home subscriptions are 1.50 (STUDIO SOUND) and 1.62 (Hi -Fi News). STUDIO SOUND is published on the 14th of the preceding month unless that date falls on a Sunday, when it appears on the Saturday.

    PAST ISSUES

    A small number of certain past issues may still be purchased from Link House, price 31p each including postage.

    Photostat copies of any STUDIO SOUND article are available at 25p including postage.

    BINDERS

    Loose -leaf binders for annual volumes of STUDIO SOUND are available from Modern Bookbinders, Chadwick Street, Blackburn, Lancashire. Price is 85p. Please quote the volume number or date when ordering.

    STUDIO SOUND, AUGUST 1972 3

    www.americanradiohistory.com

    www.americanradiohistory.com

  • spendor Studio Series

    'A new standard in loudspeaker design'*

    Types BCI and BCII

    Size L.F. Unit H.F. Units

    Nominal Impedance Frequency Range

    Power Rating BCI BCII

    25in. x 11,'n. x 12in. SPENDOR 8in. plastic cone Celestion HF 1300 S.T.C. 4001 G 8 ohms 45 Hz to 25 kHz C-3 dB, 60 Hz to 14 kHz) 40 watts programme 50 watts programme

    Types BCIA and BCIIA Specification as above but with SPENDOR power amplifier M.208 (20 watts) or M.508 (50 watts) fitted into the back panel. Balanced or unbalanced inputs are available to order.

    Prices from 72.31 Trolleys 8.50 each

    *John Shuttleworth, 'Studio Sound' September 1970.

    Spendor Audio Systems Limited Kings Mill Kings Mill Lane South Nutfield Redhill RHI 5NF Phone Nutfield Ridge 2554

    4

    -LEVEL CONTROL EQUIPMENT

    pand with . . AUDIO DESIGN RECORDING F760X the complete answer to NOISE AND COMPRESSOR PROBLEMS

    * Expander: 20 db noise attenuation * Versatile compressor * Fast peak limiter

    The best in one small simple -to- operate package, write for details now

    Audio & Design (Recording) Ltd St. Michael's, Shinfield Green, Reading, Berks

    Telephone: Reading (0734) 84487

    WOW and FLUTTER METERS

    Illustrated is the ME 102B, one of the three types of Wow and Flutter Meters distributed by us exclusively in the U.K. It is widely used by all the leading Broad- casting, TV and Recording Studios, manufacturers of tapedeck -tape recorders, turntables, record -changers -in fact by anyone concerned with the accurate measurement of drift and wow and flutter. Fuller details on application.

    LENNARD DEVELOPMENTS LTD. LOCKFIELD AVE., BRIMSDOWN, ENFIELD, MIDDX. Tel. 01 -804 8425

    www.americanradiohistory.com

    www.americanradiohistory.com

  • AMITY TAPE RECORDERS FEATURES

    Built -in Dolby (A) noise reduction systems an alter- native extra- spacesaving and much less expensive. Variable capstan speed. Heavy cast alloy deck plate. Printed circuit spooling motors. Electronically controlled braking. Direction sensing. Tension sensing (ensuring constant tape tension from end to end of spool). Plug in tape logic cards. All deck functions can be remotely controlled. All electronic functions remotely controlled. Separate aural and visual monitoring. Console mounted with teak veneered side panels. British made and designed throughout. No import duty. Our organisation ensures immediate service anywhere. It is possible to expand the number of tracks and modules from your basic purchase due to the tape recorder's special method of construction.

    For further details please write to :

    AMITY RECORDING DEVELOPMENTS 3/4 New Compton Street, London, WC2H 8DD

    TAPE WIDTH AND CONFIGURATION Mono Stereo _ 4' Tape 4 Track J 4 Track 8 Track 8 Track 16 Track 16 Track 24 Track 32 Track

    } f l f 1

    } J

    =

    =

    =

    1" Tape

    1" Tape

    2" Tape

    TAPE SPEED 15 and 30 ips. fixed and variable 38 and 76 cps. fixed and variable

    WOW AND FLUTTER Less than .05 ".. Peak

    ELECTRON ICS FREQUENCY RESPONSE Better than 30 Hz -16 kHz 2dB overall Sync. better than 30 Hz- 3 dB overall

    SIGNAL TO NOISE (Weighted) -62 dB 24 Track

    ' 2" Tape -64 dB 16 Track

    (Input) +4 dB == O.V.U. into 10 K ohms. Bridging balanced (Output) +dB= O.V.U. into 600 ohms. Balanced Clipping Level +24 dB E Q. N.A.B. Distortion better than 2 ",.

    CONSUL SIZE 24 Track Height 719 Width 45" Depth 30" 16 Track 719" 31" 30" 8 Track 55}" 31" 30" 4 Track 479" 31" 30' 2 Track 394' 31" 30

    Mono 39)" 31" 30'

    I IiWE ARE INTERESTED IN YOUR I I TAPE RECORDERS. PLEASE SEND

    FURTHER DETAILS.

    NAME

    (ATT OF)

    ADDRESS

    Tel. No

    STUDIO SOUND, AUGUST 1972 5

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