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Introduction

The instructor’s manual is designed to be a useful tool to accompany Sam Chan’s “Evangelism in a Skeptical World.” It can be integrated into the class context and customized to your particular needs.

As seen in the Table of Contents, this manual offers:

1. Websites related to evangelism

2. Chapter summaries (including key terms, key points, lesson plan ideas, suggested essay questions, and reflection questions)

3. Student learning objectives by chapter

4. Chapter quizzes and answers including 10 true/false and 10 multiple choice questions

5. Mid-term and final exams

6. Sample syllabus

Additional resources include:

1. PowerPoints corresponding to each chapter of the book

2. Online flash cards for students

3. Online student self quizzes

4. Mid-term and final exam study guides

Chan’s book offers great wisdom for equipping us to be evangelists in whatever culture we find ourselves in. Together with this manual, I hope it has a gospel impact in your life and the lives of your students.

Heather Pieris

Sydney Missionary and Bible College 2011/2012

8

Table of Contents

Introduction 2

Suggested Websites 4

Chapter Summaries 5

Chapter 1 - A Theology of Evangelism 5

Chapter 2 - Everyday Evangelism 8

Chapter 3 - How to Craft a Gospel Presentation 11

Chapter 4 - Evangelism to Postmoderns 14

Chapter 5 - Contextualization for Evangelism 17

Chapter 6 - Gospel-Cultural Hermeneutics 20

Chapter 7 - Storytelling the Gospel 23

Chapter 8 - How to Give Evangelistic Topical Talks 25

Chapter 9 - How to Give Evangelistic Expository Talks 27

Chapter 10 - Religious Epistemology, Apologetics, and Defeater Beliefs 30

Student Learning Objectives 33

Chapter 1 - A Theology of Evangelism 33

Chapter 2 - Everyday Evangelism 33

Chapter 3 - How to Craft a Gospel Presentation 33

Chapter 4 - Evangelism to Postmoderns 33

Chapter 5 - Contextualization for Evangelism 33

Chapter 6 - Gospel-Cultural Hermeneutics 33

Chapter 7 - Storytelling the Gospel 34

Chapter 8 - How to Give Evangelistic Topical Talks 34

Chapter 9 - How to Give Evangelistic Expository Talks 34

Chapter 10 - Religious Epistemology, Apologetics, and Defeater Beliefs 34

Chapter Quizzes 35

Chapter 1 - A Theology of Evangelism 35

Chapter 2 - Everyday Evangelism 37

Chapter 3 - How to Craft a Gospel Presentation 39

Chapter 4 - Evangelism to Postmoderns 41

Chapter 5 - Contextualization for Evangelism 43

Chapter 6 - Gospel-Cultural Hermeneutics 45

Chapter 7 - Storytelling the Gospel 47

Chapter 8 - How to Give Evangelistic Topical Talks 49

Chapter 9 - How to Give Evangelistic Expository Talks 51

Chapter 10 - Religious Epistemology, Apologetics, and Defeater Beliefs 53

Sample Syllabus 55

Midterm and Final Exams 58

Suggested Websites

Evangelism tools

· http://evangelismexplosion.org

· Bridge to Life gospel https://www.navigators.org/resource/the-bridge-to-life/

· Four Spiritual Laws http://crustore.org/fourlawseng.htm

· Two Ways to Live www.twowaystolive.com

· Espresso Theology offers examples of performing cultural hermeneutics on a variety of cultural texts. www.espressotheology.com

· storyingthescriptures.com

· orality.net

Articles

· http://www.matthiasmedia.com/ebriefing-343 see Broughton Knox, “What is the Gospel?”

· Timothy Keller’s sermon titled “Changed Lives,” http://www.sermoncloud.com/redeemer-presbyterian/changed-lives .

· Claire Smith, “Broken Bad,” http://gotherefor.com/offer.php?intid=29295.

· David Brooks, “The Shame Culture,” in The New York Times. http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/15/opinion/the-shame-culture.html.

· Andy Crouch, “The Return of Shame,” in Christianity Today. http://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2015/march/andy-crouch-gospel-in-age-of-public-shame.html.

· Warrick Farah and Kyle Meeker, “The W-Spectrum: Worker Paradigms in Muslim Contexts,” Evangelical Missions Quarterly (Vol. 51, No. 4, October 2015): 366-75. https://www.emqonline.com/node/3387.

Talks

· Tim Keller’s talk “Dwelling in the Gospel”  https://vimeo.com/8977644.

Chapter Summaries

Chapter 1 - A Theology of Evangelism

Key Terms

· evangelism

· gospel

· election

· atonement

· external call

· internal call

· illumination

· instrument

· locution

· illocution

· perlocution

· regeneration

· metanoia

· epistrophē

· faith

· propositional knowing

· assent (assensus)

· personal trust (fiduaia)

· conversion

· discipleship

· cognitive thinkers

· intuitive thinkers

· concrete-relational thinkers

· God’s sovereignty

· human responsibility

· casual-link

· dialogical-link

Key Points

· Evangelism is where humans communicate the good news of Jesus to unbelievers, trusting God can effect internal changes.

· The gospel can be explained in different ways, but is always centered around the Good news of Jesus.

· There are many distinct roles in evangelism, but this book focuses on the believers’ part and how to do it well.

· Becoming a Christian can be understood from two perspectives: God’s story of regeneration and the human story of conversion.

· The Bible contains many conversion models: the rebel, the zealot, and the believer-since-infancy.

· The Bible contains many evangelism models: the cognitive thinker, the intuitive thinker, and the concrete-relational thinker.

Chapter Summary

Evangelism broadly refers to people communicating the gospel. This book narrows in on the aspect of Christians communicating the gospel to non-believers in the hope that they may believe in Jesus. The gospel refers to the significant story focused around Jesus. Evangelism is primarily determined by its message, not its method, medium, occasion, or audience.

The New Testament refers to the gospel as God’s good news (Romans 1:1), but also Paul’s good news (Romans 16:25). Hence this gospel is God’s and also ours, told to us in a variety of ways and belonging to us within our culture. The gospel can be described by systematic theologians in terms of creation, sin, salvation, and conversion. Storytellers may communicate the gospel as one big story. So, there are many ways of explaining the gospel according to who is listening.

First Thessalonians 1:4-10 gives an example of the various roles in evangelism. It is important to note the differences God, Jesus, the evangelist, the hearers, and the Holy Spirit play. As evangelists, we are to focus on communicating the gospel well and not trying to fulfill other roles ourselves. The human responsibility is to communicate the gospel as best we can, whilst relying on God who chooses his elect. We are to offer the external call to non-believers, which is open to all, but resistible. The internal call is private and the work of the Holy Spirit. God, in his sovereignty, chooses to use human evangelism as the natural and instrumental means of bringing people to faith in Jesus.

Conversion of a non-believer has two perspectives, God’s and ours. God causes regeneration, but hearing the gospel from another person is the instrumental means. God communicates with us using words, which is known as a dialogical-link. Conversion from a human perspective involves repentance (metanoia and epistrophē) and faith. Metanoia refers to the positive change in heart, character, and disposition. Epistrophē refers to the turning away from the negative and turning toward the positive. Biblical faith is more than just propositional knowing and assent; it must be paired with personal trust for a saving faith. This faith requires high-risk action. Conversion is the start of the faith journey while discipleship is the continuation of the faith journey each day afterwards.

There are three models of conversion: the rebel, the zealot, and the believer-since-infancy. Timothy Keller refers to Acts 16 for three models of evangelism; the cognitive thinker, the intuitive thinker, and the concrete-relationship thinker. These models help us to remember there is not one method of evangelism. Our chosen method will differ according to the audience.

Evangelism can be done in many ways and God will use these natural means for his supernatural regenerating purposes.

Pedagogical Suggestions/Lesson Plan Ideas

· In small groups, ask students to briefly share their conversion story. Ask them to reflect on which model best describes them: the rebel, the zealot, or the believer-since-infancy? They could further discuss any other categories of conversion.

· Ask students to discuss what model/s of evangelism appealed to them: a reasoned discussion, a power encounter, or the example of a believer? Ask them to reflect on their most commonly used method of evangelism.

· Ask students to compare and contrast different gospel explanations like Evangelism Explosion, The Four Spiritual Laws, Bridge to Life, and Two Ways to Live. Discuss what kind of person each one appeals to.

· Ask students to read 1 Thessalonians 1:4-10 and discuss the different roles involved in the conversion process.

Other Media Sources/Websites

· http://www.matthiasmedia.com/ebriefing-343 see Broughton Knox, “What is the Gospel?”

· http: