Vol XXXIV Issue 13

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END OF THE YEARRRRRRRR, Sbink'd, Ludicrous Concert, Top Ten, AAEZINE, How Cool Are You? Bill Nye, Roth Regatta, Earthstock

Transcript of Vol XXXIV Issue 13

  • TABLE OF CONTENTSEDITORIALSFarewell!

    NEWSURECARoth RegattaDo It In the Dark

    FEATURES

    CULTURE

    4

    567

    Climate Change...Whats up With That?Students as Organ Donors

    910

    COMICSOPINIONShbinkdGuns are Bad...

    Ludicrous Concert 12Top Ten... 13

    14

    2021

    Bill! Bill! Bill!1516

    The Pull List

    Stadiums of S&*%How Cool are You?

    SPORTSMaysonets Movin Up 22

    Nostalgia Goggles1718

    7Boston VigilEarthStock 8

    19

    Baseball Rules! 22Archery is Cool, Too 23Bro, He Does Even Lift 24

  • THE STONY BROOK PRESSEXECUTIVE EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR BUSINESS MANAGER ART DIRECTOR PRODUCTION MANAGER NEWS EDITOR NEWS EDITOR FEATURES EDITOR CULTURE EDITOR SPORTS EDITOR WEB EDITOR OPINION EDITOR PHOTO EDITOR COPY EDITOR COPY EDITOR MINISTER OF ARCHIVESDISTRIBUTION MANAGEROMBUDSMAN

    JODIE MANNNICK BATSONARIELLE DOLLINGERTOM JOHNSONJESSE CHANGJOHN FISCHERJASMINE HAEFNER REBECCA TAPIOBUSHRA MOLLICKBEATRICE VANTAPOOLHOWIE NEWSBERKMANOLIVIA BURNEDAINE TAYLOROLIVIA BURNESTEVEN YOUNGSEAN FISCHERGIL GAMESHANDREW CARRIERIEVAN GOLDAPER

    STAFFSURAIYA AFRINAJESSICA BEEBETERICHI BELLINGERNICOLE BREMSSIOBHAN CASSIDYALEKS GILBERT-PETROVICBRYAN GUTHYBRIAN JOHNSON

    PRISCILA KORBDEVIN LEWISSAMUEL LIEBRANDBRIANA LIONETTIMARK McCLEANTEENA NAWABIVANESSA OGLEHAYLEY PARR

    CAITHLIN PEACHRIS PRIOREANDY POLHAMUSMATT WILLEMAIN

    The Stony Brook Press is published fortnightly during the academic year and twice during summer session by The Stony Brook Press, a student-run non-profit organization funded by the Student Activity Fee. The opinions expressed in letters, articles and viewpoints do not necessarily reflect those of The Stony Brook Press as a whole. Advertising policy does not necessarily reflect editorial policy. Staff meetings are held Wednesdays at 1:00 p.m. First copy free. For additional copies contact the Business Manager.

    The Stony Brook PressSuites 060&061Student UnionSUNY at Stony BrookStony Brook, NY 11794-3200Email: editors@sbpress.com

  • Typically, every May the exiting executive editor of !e Stony Brook Press writes a farewell editorial about where the Press has gone under his or her reign and whats up ahead. *is is not one of those years. Our executive, Nick Batson, will be passing the torch to Jodie Mann, but he will not be leaving !e Press entirely. Instead, I will be leaving (or at least abandoning all positions but author of !e Boring Rocks). So Ms. Mann asked me to write my farewell. But +rst, the beginning.

    Four years ago, I was a gangly awkward teenager with almost no ideas about what to do with my time. I say almost, because I knew I had two usable skills: intense knowledge of English grammar and the ability to draw mildly-humorous talking animals. *ere werent many clubs where those techniques could promote me to a three-year tenure as third-in-command. In fact, theres only one: !e Stony Brook Press. And being part of the Press, though troubling at times, was honestly one of the most fun parts of my time at college.

    But as a gangly freshman, I didnt know that. I suspected that a newspaper would be good to join, but how to choose which one? At the time, the campus had many news organizations: !e Press, the esteemed Statesman, the plucky Independent, the quirky !ink, the, uh, unique Patriot But only one told me that they had Nintendo consoles in the o,ce. So I took my talents to the Press. At the second meeting I attended, I basically just played Castlevania. At the third, Tetris Attack. But while doing that, I somehow learned a lot about journalism and management.

    You might wonder why Im telling you this, besides the self-indulgent catharsis that characterizes most of what I write.

    Actually, this time its all essential. You see, !e Press was, and is, and hopefully will be a great publication because of its laid-back atmosphere and sense of acceptance. And from this venue can thus come both manic oddities like Stadiums of Shit and important stories like the Lamar/Aoki scandal. With our skills and attitudes, we can review Bubble Tape while still having the integrity to handle stories of death and destruction with the seriousness they deserve.!e Press is an intersection of fun and quality that can only

    come from people who are passionate about what they do: whether its photos, art, features, poetry, reviews, sports, Sportz, opinions, telling jokes and yes, even journalism. And fun and quality is really the most you could ask from a campus paper. As long as there are passionate people here (and I assure you, our replacements have passion to spare), !e Press will still be everything youre hoping for.

    Four years ago, in the +rst printed Boring Rocks comic, Pippin told Fwubo that he needed to stop being timid and stand up for what he believed in. Id like to think in some ways, I spent the past four years doing the same. Maybe no one cared. But Im still glad I put my work out there. And if youre passionate about what you do, I implore you to do the same. Stony Brook needs more folks like you. !e Press needs more folks like you. Come down and show us what youre made of. Youll be glad you gave yourself the chance.

    ~Evan Goldaper (former Associate Editor of !e Stony Brook Press)

    FAREWELL EDITORIAL by Evan Goldaper

    EDITORIALS

    4 May 3 2013

  • More than 268 of Stony Brooks top undergraduate students participated in the annual Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities (URECA) end of year symposium on April 24. *is celebration, which has taken place each spring since 1999, allows students involved in supervised research to showcase their +ndings.

    URECA itself was established in 1987. According to the SURJUDPV ZHEVLWH 6WRQ\ %URRN ZDV RQH RI WKH UVW UHVHDUFKXQLYHUVLWLHV LQ WKH FRXQWU\ WR HVWDEOLVK DQ RIFH IRU WKH VSHFLFpurpose of promoting undergraduate research and creative activity, and offers many programs that support undergraduate research efforts. These include the Battelle Summer Research Program, the Beckman Scholars Program, Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Site Programs, Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Undergraduate Research Programs, and the URECA Summer Research and Small Grant/Travel Grant Programs.

    Karen Kernan, who has served as the director of URECA since 2001, has seen the end-of-year symposium grow in scope over time.

    In 2002, we had about 75 posters displayed in the SAC lobby, now we have 268 projects, she said through an email message.

    The bulk of the days events consisted of poster exhibits set up in SAC Ballroom A. Students who have conducted research LQYDULRXVHOGVLQFOXGLQJPDWKHPDWLFVVRFLRORJ\EXVLQHVVDQGpolitical science, create these posters to visually display their UHVHDUFK QGLQJV 7KH VWXGHQW UHVHDUFKHUV DUH DOVR RQ KDQG WRanswer questions from attendees.

    One of the many exhibits on the day was created by Jesse Pogonik and Jake Muldoon, both of whom conducted organic chemistry research under the supervision of Professor Dale Drueckhammer of the Chemistry Department. Pogonik and Muldoon each worked in the undergraduate chemistry labsthey researched organic chemistry there tooand concurred that the experience broadened their horizons. You learn to accept frustration, and you get to devise creative ways of tackling problems, Muldoon said of the overall research experience.

    Another display came from Amy Marshall, Kevin Ryan and Ben McKeeby. Their project, Sedimentation and its Effects on Chlorophyll A Production in High and Low Microbial Sponges, was conducted with the guidance of Bradley Peterson and Joseph Warren, both associate professors in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. According to Ryan, the research for this

    project began when he and Marshall partook in a study abroad program in Jamaica. It was quite interesting and given more time, wed like to go back to continue our research, he said.

    Erin Kunz created a project, Immunohistochemical Analysis of MUSTIN I Expression during Fracture Healing, under the supervision of Professor David Komatsu of the Department of Orthopedics. Kunzs research began when she contacted Komatsu after he guest lectured for one of her classes. On her overall experience, Kunz said: Research is a lot of fun, and lets you get a hands-on learning experience and gets you interested in the future. It keeps you involved.

    In addition to the poster presentations, the Departments of History, English and Psychology hold their own symposiums to showcase oral research reports during the day. Regarding the origins of the History Departments symposium, in an email message, Professor Emeritus Joel Rosenthal said: I think it was when [Professor] Sara Lipton was either undergrad director or just involved with a lot of students that she said there was no reason why URECA should only be for science students. This was probably a bit over 10 years ago, early 2000s I believe.

    Rosenthal said the symposium is open to students: Everyone who does a [two]-semester History Honors paper is invited to read a short paper. Other students in 400 level [classes] and perhaps in the odd 300 level [class] are asked, if they are doing research papers, whether they want to participate.

    This year, six students presented their papers in 15-minute windows, before answering related questions from a panel of History Department faculty members. One of the presenters ZDV'DYLG 3XULFDWRZKR GHYHORSHG KLV KRQRUV WKHVLVCanine reinvention: Nineteenth Century cultural attitudes and domestic dogs, with the guidance of Professor Jared Farmer. It was a little GXELRXVDWUVWEXWLWWXUQHGRXWWREHIXQ,OLNHWDONLQJDERXWWKHVHWRSLFVVDLG3XULFDWRRQKLVRYHUDOOUHVHDUFKH[SHULHQFH

    Director Kernan believes that URECA is an important asset to the University. In an email message she said: I think that being i