Understanding the Millennial Generation's Staying ... · Understanding the Millennial ... Mindset...

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Understanding the Millennial Generation's Staying Connected Mindset Securing the eCampus 2010 Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D. July 19-21, 2010 Dartmouth College Haldeman Center Hanover, New Hampshire Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference 1

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  • Understanding the Millennial Generation's Staying Connected

    Mindset

    Securing the eCampus 2010

    Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.

    July 19-21, 2010Dartmouth CollegeHaldeman Center

    Hanover, New Hampshire

    Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference 1

  • ETPRO

    2Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Overview

    Research and ReportsTrends

    Kaiser Family FoundationECAR

    Pew and Internet Life Studies

    3Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8-18 yr Olds

    4Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

    Kaiser Family Foundation

    http://www.kff.org/entmedia/

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    From Kaiser Foundation M2 Study Press Release

    Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

    http://www.kff.org/entmedia/

  • Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8-18 yr Olds

    8-18 yr average 7 hrs and 38 min (7:38) using entertainment media across a typical day (more than 53 hours a week).

    Due to media multitasking they actually manage to pack a total of 10 hours and 45minutes (10:45) worth of media content into those 7 hours.

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    Kaiser Family Foundation Released Jan 20, 1010Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Generation M2: Media in the Lives of 8-18 yr Olds

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    Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for

    educational purposes with credit given -2010 eCampus Conference

  • Mobile Media Consumption

    Over the past five years 39% to 66% for cell phones 18% to 76% for iPods and other MP3 players young people now spend more time listening to

    music, playing games, and watching TV on their cell phones (a total of :49 daily) than they spend talkingon them (:33)

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    Kaiser Family Foundation 2010

    Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Types of Media

    TV remains the dominant type of media content consumed, at 4:29 a daymusic/audio at 2:31computers at 1:29video games at 1:13print at :38movies at :25 a day

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    Multitasking

    Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Types of Media

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    educational purposes with credit given -2010 eCampus Conference

  • Activities

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    educational purposes with credit given -2010 eCampus Conference

  • EDUCAUSE Center

    Provide college and university administrators, particularly those charged with implementing the technology environments, with reliable information on undergraduates behaviors, preferences, and overall satisfaction with technology.

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  • ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and IT, 2009

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    Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for

    educational purposes with credit given -2010 eCampus Conference

    Smith, Shannon, Gail Salaway, and Judith Borreson Caruso, with an Introduction by Richard N. Katz. The ECAR Study of Undergraduate Students and Information Technology, 2009 (Research Study, Vol. 6). Boulder, CO: EDUCAUSE Center for Applied Research, 2009, available from http://www.educause.edu/ecar.

  • ECAR Research Questions

    What kinds of IT are students using, and with what levels of skill?What do students perceive to be the value and advantages of the use of IT?What is the experience of students with IT in their courses?What obstacles do students face in their use of technology?

    14Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR StudyLongitudinal extension of the 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007, and 2008 studies.

    Based on quantitative data from a spring 2009 survey of 30,616 freshmen and seniors at 103 four-year institutions and students at 12 two-year institutions;

    Student focus groups that included input from 62 students at 4 institutions;

    Review of qualitative data from written responses to open-ended questions.

    15Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR Study

    Studies student ownership, experience, behaviors, preferences, and skills with respect to information technologies

    the 2009 study also includes a special focus on student ownership and use of Internet-capable handheld devices.

    16Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR StudyIts hard to believe, but when the college seniors we surveyed for this years study began their education four years ago, netbooks, iPhones, and the Nintendo Wii had yet to hit the market. When they went home for the holidays during their freshman year, some returned with a brand new game called Guitar Hero for the PlayStation 2, and some may have been lucky enough to score a $250 4-GB iPod nano or an ultrathin digital camera. Todays freshmen have mobile phones that hold more songs than that 4-GB nano, and they can use them to take digital photos and videos of the same quality as the $400 camera todays seniors got for their high school graduation.

    17Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

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    Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for

    educational purposes with credit given -2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR 2009 FindingsThe vast majority of respondents, 9 out of 10, use the college and university library website (94.6%), with a median frequency of use of weeklyabout 9 in 10 use presentation software (93.8%) and spreadsheets(86.8%), with a median frequency of monthly.Downloading music or videos is also popular- 84.2% said they do it, with a median frequency of weekly. This activity has grown in popularity since 2006The percentage of students who reported they download music or video has increased from 71.4% to 83.5% in the 39-institution longitudinal data set, and those who download daily increased from7.2% t0 11.0%.

    19Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR 2009 Findings

    Web 2.0 user-driver sites Video websites (44.8%) Wikis (41.9%) Blogs (37.3%) Podcasts (35.0%)

    2009 asked students if they use computer for phone callsvoice over Internet Protocol, or VolP (Skype, etc.) (37.7%) median frequency of use is monthly

    20Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR Study: Interactive Communication Tools

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  • ECAR Study: Older Catching Up

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  • ECAR: IT for CoursesWhich technologies were they actively using as a part of their courses at the time of the survey (February 23 through April 13, 2009) college or university library website (73.1%) a course or learning management system (70.4%) presentation software such as PowerPoint (66.5%) and almost half (46.3%) said they use spreadsheets

    such as Excel.

    23Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR: IT for CoursesDespite the very high percentages of personal use of SNSs, only 27.8% reported using them in a course during the quarter or semester of the survey.25.3% use wikisFewer than 2 in 19 use instant messaging (18.3%)Graphics software (15.5%)Blogs (11.5%)Programming languages such as C++ and Java (11.1%)

    24Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR Findings

    Students are learning and using these technologies, but not necessarily for formal academic purposes

    1/3 reported using these software tools at least once per year overall

    For Coursesonly 5.8% were using podcasts6.0% were using video-creation software5.0% were using audio-creation software

    25Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR Study

    How Students View Their Own Technology

    traditional distribution w/ rough bell curvehalf (51.0%) identifying themselves as mainstream adopters gender gap, more than half of males (53.8%)

    claimed they are early adopters or innovators whereas only one-fourth of females (25.4%)

    did so. 26Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • ECAR Study

    How Students View Their Own Technology

    Feel skilled or very skilled with presentation software, spreadsheets, course and learning management systems, and college and university library websites

    Respondents assessed themselves lower on their use of graphics software and on computer maintenance activities such as software updates and security

    27Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • CMS

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  • Institutions investments in CMSs seem to be paying off

    Positive (52.0%) or very positive (11.2%). Respondents who used a CMS more frequently reported more

    positive experiences.

    Two-thirds (64.7%) said that they disagree or strongly disagree with the statement I skip classes when materials from course lectures are available online.

    29Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Institutions investments in CMSs seem to be paying off

    I get more actively involved in courses that use IT.

    IT makes doing my course activities more convenient. 70.4% agreed

    The use of IT in my courses improves my learning.

    By the time I graduate, the IT I have used in my courses will have adequately prepared me for theworkplace.

    30Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Handheld Devices

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  • What Activities

    When using Internet from a handheld device what Internet activities do they use it for (selecting all that apply from a list of 13 activities) 76.7% checking for information such as news, weather, sports, specific facts, etc. 58.7% connect to use maps, find places, get directions, or plan routes. Other activities identified by respondents were e-mail (75.1%) SNSs (62.5%)

    32Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Mobile Devices in the Academic Environment

    (32.2%) agreed or strongly agreed with the statement While in class, I regularly use my cell phone or handheld Internet device for non-course activities.50.5% agreed or strongly agreed instructorsshould have the authority to forbid the use of cell phones and handheld Internet devices during class time higher among older than among younger students

    33Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • 3 Top InstitutionalIT Services

    Most likely to use, if available, from an Internet-capable handheld device e-mail system (63.4%) student administrative services (official

    grades, registration, etc.) (46.8%) course or learning management system

    (45.7%).

    34Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

    See ECAR Conclusion Summary Handout

  • Pew Research Centers Internet & American Life ProjectSeries of reports undertaken by the Pew Research Center Highlight the attitudes and behaviors of the Millennial generation, a cohort defined as adults ages 18 to 29.

    35Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for

    educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Pew Internet Project

    Teens and adults reveal a decline in blogging among teens and young adults and a modest rise among adults 30 and older.In 2009, 14% of teens and 15% of young adults blogAdults > 30 bloggers rose from 7% in 2006 to 11% in 2009

    36Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • Increase in SNS

    Drop in blogging among younger internet users = changes in social network useNearly three quarters (73%) of online teens and an equal number (72%) of young adults use social network sites.

    40% of adults 30 and older used the social sites in the fall of 2009

    37Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

    Pew Internet Project

  • Pew Internet Project

    12-17 year olds do not use Twitter just 8% of online teens 12-17 say they ever

    use TwitterSimilar to the number who use virtual

    worldsThis puts Twitter far down the list of popular online activities for teens and stands in stark contrast to their record of being early adopters of nearly every online activity.

    38Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010

    eCampus Conference

  • Blogging OutMicroBlogging In

    Wireless connectivity continues to rise inthe < 30 age groupFacebook has taken over as the social network of choice 73% of adult profile owners use Facebook,

    48% have a profile on MySpace and 14% use LinkedIn

    Microblogging and status updating on social networks have replaced old-style macro-blogging for many teens and adults

    39Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference

  • 40Pew Internet Project

  • Teens and Mobile Phones Over the Past Five Years: Pew Internet Looks Back

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  • Pew Internet Trends Data

    71% of teens owned cell phones in 2008

    77% of teens own a game console like an Xbox or a PlayStation 74% of teens own an iPod or mp3 player 60% of teens own a desktop or laptop computer55% of teens own a portable gaming device

    42Copyright 2010: Davina Pruitt-Mentle, Ph.D.: Permission to use for educational purposes with credit given - 2010 eCampus Conference