TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU M ~ 1~

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TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU FROM: Joseph Marthan. LittlLang. Program Coordinator M DATE: June 9, 1997 V / RE: Coordinator's Report Please find attached the Coordinator's Report for 1996-1997. Thank you. cc: LittlLang. Faculty

Transcript of TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU M ~ 1~

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TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU

FROM: Joseph Marthan. LittlLang. Program Coordinator M ~ 1~ DATE: June 9, 1997 V /

RE: Coordinator's Report

Please find attached the Coordinator's Report for 1996-1997. Thank you.

cc: LittlLang. Faculty

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I. Program Development A. The Literature and Language Curriculum

B. Program Statistics 1. Program Courses 2. GCourses 3. LittiLang Faculty Preceptees 4. Declared and Undeclared LittiLang Majors as of 2/14/97 5. LittlLang Graduation Figures (Fall 1996-Spring 1997) 6. Placement of Graduates

C. Admission Efforts

II. Program Faculty A. Professional, Teaching and Community Activities ofLittiLang Faculty (1996-1997)

B. Committee Participation of LittiLang Faculty (1996-1997) 1. Faculty Assembly Standing Committees 2. Other Committees

III. Program Evaluation A. Program Activities

B. Issues, Goals and Objectives

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I. PROGRAM DEVELOPl\1ENT A. The Literature and Language Curriculum:

This year, the LittlLang. Program has seen changes, small and large. Foremost a new curriculum has been adopted. Tom Kinsella, from the English Track, initiated and wrote, with the active participation of Lisa Honaker and Anne Myles, a working document. It was circulated among the Program Faculty for input and feedback. Formal, as well as informal, discussions were engaged in a variety offormats. We held a Program Retreat on November 15, 1997 to discuss the first draft. Other discussions followed, whether through Program and Track meetings, or campus mail or e-mail. Two expository meetings were held exclusively for students to introduce them to the new curriculum, answer their questions and get their reactions. The 5-Year Program Review lent a timeliness and a focus to ali these exchanges.

After undergoing several revisions, the draft took shape and an updated document was ready for the consultants' visits. By the end of the Spring Term, a finalized new Program Curriculum Worksheet for all Tracks was sent to Academic Advising.

I would like at this point, to acknowledge and thank, on behalf of the Program, Tom and, for their help, Lisa and Anne. Tom was the inspiration and the coalescing force behind the new curriculum. He solicited, encouraged, and welcomed, suggestions and revisions.

I would like to highlight just some features of the new curriculum: There have been, within the last few years, several curriculum revisions. A trend emerges:

in each successive revision the number of core courses decreases while the number of Track (and cognate) courses expands. Each revision has given students more latitude and flexibility. Tn return, students are invested with more responsibility to come up, among a \vide range of offerings, with a coherent and judicious choice that serve them best.

-The new curriculum is more appealing to students outside of the Program, and to more Freshmen and Sophomores. The new 2000 courses with no prerequisites will particularly be attractive to non-Program Majors. This is a welcome development.

-There is less emphasis on periodic approaches and more on thematic and cultural approaches.

-New Program students would still get a good grounding in Literary Methodologies and acquire skills to enable them to approach, from different angles, texts, analyze them deeply and survey their contexts. Moreover, they will be equipped, better than ever before, to do print and electronic media research, and investigate independently.

Our Program students may be among the best prepared, not only at Stockton, but also at other institutions around the country to deal with the fast pace of technological advances and the explosion of information. These incessant efforts to involve students in new technologies and keep them up with the latest innovations were spearheaded by our English colleagues, Ken Tompkins, the ever pioneer, and Tom Kinsella.

-another useful feature of the new curriculum is the availability of self-paced On-line Reading courses for variable credits. They offer an opportunity for students to take stock of their oWl}' preparation and fill in any gap in ClllIDniCal texts.

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Name: _________ SS#: _________ Preceptor: _____ _ Date: Track: _____ _

LITERATURE & LANGUAGE - B.A CIJRRICIJUJl\1 WO RKSHEET

Fall!997

Liberal Studies Requirements: (no more than 16 cr. in anyune "G~l , be ied towards the BA

General Studies Credits:

At Some Distance Electives, or I additional "G" Credits

Writing Requirement: (all courses must have "C" or better grades) 1. W! course (frosh): 3. Other W! or W2 course: ___ _ 2. Other W! or W2 course: 4. 3000-4900 level (W! or W2 course): ___ _

Quantitative Reasoning Requirement: 1. Q! course: 2. Q2 course: ___ _ 3. Q! or Q2 course: ___ _

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LITERATURE Al"-U LAl'lGUAGE TRACKS

The Graduate SchooVEnglish Track

In addition to the common core, students must take:

LITI2 __ Lm2 __ LITI 3 __ Classical or Medieval literature LITI 3 Renaissance or 1 7th-C literature LITI 3-18th- or 19th-Centur" literature LITI 3= 20th-Century literaru:;.e UTI 3

(4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4) (4)

Foreign Language Requirement LITI/Cognates

(0-12) (12-24)

Creath'e Writing Track

For students in the Creative Writing track the Senior Seminar may also be a Senior Project.

In addition to the common core, students must take:

PHIL 3114 Aesthetics (4) Foreign Language Requirement (0-12) LITI 3 Classical, Medieval. Renaissance or 17th-C literature (4) LITI 3 __ 18th- or 19th-Century literature (4) LITT 3 __ 20th-Century literature (this course is L1 addition 10 Creative \Vriting track requirements-e.g. Frost, Williams, Stevens or a major fiction "Titer, like Faulkner) (4) LITI/Cogriiifes -- (4-16) Poetry Concentration: LITI I Jl2 Introduction to Poetry (4) LITI 2635 Poetry Writing Workshop (4) LITI 2636 Fiction Writing Workshop (4) LITI 3635 Advanced Poetry Writing Workshop' (4) LITI 3712 Frost, Williams and Stevens (4) Fietloll Concentration: LITI 1110 Introduction to Fiction (substitutions penmitted, with preceptor's approval) (4) LITI 2635 Poetry Writing Workshop (4) LITI 2636 Fiction Writing Workshop (4) LITI 3636 Advanced Fiction Writing Workshop' (4) And one LITI 3000-level major author course from among the fiction "Titers available. (4)

- • (may be repeated ol1ce for credit)

Pre-Professional Track

ln addition to the common core, students must take:

LITI2__ (4) LITI 3 __ Classical, Medieval, Ren. or 17th-Century literature (4) LITI 3 __ 18th- or 19th-Century literature (4) LITI 3 __ 20th-Century literature (4)

Law Concentration (choose from 7 different acron)ms)

ACCT, ciUM, ECON, H1ST, ]};rO 1180, PH14, PLA.W, POLS (See Bulle/in for specific course Choices)

(28)

LITT Electives or Cognates (8) Medicine Concentration (Choose 7 courses and their labs) (35) BIOL 1100 Organisms and Evolution (and lab) Bl0L 1200 Cells and Molecules (and lab) CHEM 21 10 Chern I-General PrL1ciples (and lab) CHEM 2120 Chern Jl-Organic Structure (and lab) CHEM 2130 Chern JIl-Organic Reactions (and lab) CHEM 2140 Chern lV-Genml Principles (and lab) PHYS 2220 Physics (and lab) PHYS 2230 Physics!! (and lib) MATH 2215 Calculus!

TheaterlEnglish Track

The L1TT Segment UTI 1101 Lilerary Methodologies (4) UTI 2 J 23 Introduction 10 Literary Research (4) UTI 461 0 Senior Seminar (or UTT 4900 Senior Project) (4) LANG 2115 Hist. of the English Lang. and Gram. (4) LITI2__ (4) LITI 3 Classical or Medieval literature (4) UTI 3205 Shakespeare (4) LITI 3 __ 18th- or J 9th-Century literature (4) UTI 3 __ 20th-Century literature (4) UTI 3__ (4) The THEA TER Segment ARTP 2183 Theater Crafts (4) ARTP2681 Acting! (4) ARTP 31 JO/3 112 Theater His! 1 and JJ (8) ARTP 311 J/3113 Theater Lit lor JJ (4) ARTP 3180 Directing (4) Choose 2 from: ARTP 2285 Lighting and Design (4) ARTP 2287 Costume Design for Theater and Dance(4) ARTP 2683 Scenic Design (4) ARTP Elective in SingingNoice (2) ARTP Elective in Dance/Movement (2)

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Literature and Language Track

Classics Concentration

For students in the Classics Concentration, the Senior Seminar may also be a Senior Project

In addition to the common core, students musi take:

LlTI 2100 European Literature I (4) GREEK ..

LANG 1261: Beginning Ancient Greek I1* (4) LANG 2260 Intermediate Ancient Greek I (4) LANG 2261. Intermediate Ancient Greek 11 (4) LANG 3260 Advanced Ancient Greek (twice, with different author). (8) "Beginning I is a GEN course and will count as part of the student's General Studies, not program, requirement. In HistOlY, choose at least one ofthefollowing: (4) HIST 1100 The Ancient World any Greek history course any ARTV course in ancient art In Latin"" 2 courses: (8) At least one course in Latin beyond the level of Beginning I and at least one course which studies the history/culture of Ancient Rome. "Note: Ancient Hebrew is an acceptable substitute in this sub-track for Latin. In Literature or Philosophy, at least one of the following: (4) LITT 3103 The Greek TT2gedians or LlTT 3731 Sophocles and His World LlTT 3109 Homer or LlTT 3730 Homer and His World PHIL 2109 Ancient Greek Philosophy LATIN LANG 1702 Introduction to Latin II" (4) LANG 2710 Intermediate Latin I (4) LANG 2711 Intermediate Latin 11 (4) LANG 3710 Advanced Latin (tv-'ice with different authors). (8) "Beginning I is a GEN course and will count as part of the student's General Studies, not program, requirement. In History, at least Ol7e of the following: (4) HIST 1100 The Ancient World HIST 2112 Fall of RomelRise of Byzantium or any other Roman history course any ARTV course in ancient art In Greek"" 2 courses: (8)

At least one course in Ancient Greek beyond the level of Beginning 1 and at least one course which studies the history!culture of Ancient Greece. "Note: .A.ncient Hebrew is an acceptable substitute in this sub-track for Greek. In Literature or Philosophy, at least one of the following: (4) LlTI 3103 The Greek Tragedians or LlTT 3731 Sophocles and His World LlTI 3109 Homer or LlTT 3730 Homer and His World PHIL 2109 Ancient Greek Philosophy

Spanish Concentration

For students in the Spanish Concentration the Senior Seminar is normally a Senior Project.

In addition to the common core, students must take:

L1TT2100 European Lit. I (4) LANG 1241 Beginning Spanish II (4) LANG 2140 Il11emlediate Spanish I (4) LANG 2241 Intermediate Spanish II (4) LANG 3240 Advanced Spanish (4)

2 additional courses in Spanish Literature: genre, major author, period, etc. (8)

2 additional courses in LEtL'1 American Literature: genre, major author: period, etc. (8)

Additional credits in either Study Abroad, or anomer foreign hmguage, or general literature courses, or cognates (e.g. Art History, History, Philosophy and Religion, Latin Anmican studies). (16)

French Concentration

For students in the French Concentration the Senior Seminar is nomlaliy a Senior Project.

In addition to the common core, students must take:

LANG 1231 Beginning French 11 (4) LANG 2230 IntemJediate French I (4) LANG 2231 Intennediate French II (4) LANG 3230 Advanced French (4) LANG 3231 French Composition: Culture (4) LlTT 3710 French Literature I (4) LlTT 3711 French Literature II (4) L1TT/LANG Cognates, including Study Abroad (24)

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Name: ________ SS#. _______ PRECEPTOR:. _______ _

MINORS IN ARTS AND HUMANITIES CURRICULUM WORKSHEET

FALL 1997

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 20 5 LANG acronym courses' This does not include Beginning Foreign Language 1, which is a GEN 12xx course. A grade of "C" or better is required in all courses FRENCH LANG 1231 Beginning French II (4)

LANG 2230 Intermediate French I (4) LANG 2231 Intermediate French II (4Y LANG 3230 Advanced French I (4)

LANG 3231 French Composition: A Cultural Approach (4)

LATIN LANG 1702 Intro to Latin II (4) I LANG 2710 Intermediate Latin I (4 )

LANG 2711 Intermediate Latin II (4 )

LANG 3710 Advanced Latin (4)

LANG 3710 Advanced Latin (4)

SPANISH LANG 1241 Beginning Spanish II (4)

LANG 2240 Intermediate Spanish I (4)

LANG 2241 Intermediate Spanish II (4)

LANG 3240 Advanced Spanish (4)

LlTT xxxx Lit course in Hispanic Literature (4)

Transfer students with college credit in French, Spanish, and Latin will be entering at the appropriate level of language instruction. A minimum of three courses taught in the target language-some of which may have a LlTT acronym-must be taken at Stockton to satisfy the 20 credit requirement for a language minor.

All the required courses for the minor must be taken in the same lanquaqe.

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-As for the Language Minors, they remained unchanged except for a slight modification of the Spanish Minor: Lang 3241 has been replaced by a course in Hispanic Literature.

B. PROGRAM STATISTICS:

1. Program Courses (Fa111996-Spring 1997) a. Fal11996

Literature: LITT-1100-001 INTRO TO LITERATURE LITT-llOO-002 INTRO TO LITERATURE LITT-1101-001 LITERARY:METHODOLOGIES LITT-1111-001 INTRODUCTION TO DRAMA LITT-l112-001 INTRODUCTION TO POETRY LITT 2100-001 EUROPEAN LITERATURE I LITI 2102-001 BRITISH LITERATURE I LITT 2104-001 A:MERICAN LITERATURE I LITT 2635-00 1 POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP LITT 2636-001 FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP LITT 3125-001 LITT THEORY & CRITICISM LITT 3205-001 SHAKESPEARE LITT 3618-001 MODERN BRITISH NOVEL LITT 3621-001 EARLY A:MERICAN LITT LITT 3713-001 RISE OF BRITISH NOVEL LITI 4610-001 SENIOR SEMINAR Number of INDEPENDENT STUDIES

- -

Languages:

Enrollment 37 36 33 18 25 30 43 25 15 14 15 47 15 7

10 15 16

LANG 1241-001 BEGINNING SPANISH II 29 LANG 1241-002 BEGINNING SPANISH II 24 LANG 1271-001 BEGINNING MODERN GREEK II 13 LANG 2230-001 INTER:MEDIATE FRENCH I 21 LANG 2240-001 INTER:MEDIATE SPANISH I 15 LANG 2710-001 INTER:MEDIATE LATIN I 4 LANG 3230-001 ADVANCED FRENCH 7 LANG 3240-001 ADVANCED SPANISH 10 Number of Th'DEPENDENT STUDIES 9

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b. Spring 1997 Literature: LITT 1100-001 INTRO TO LITERATURE 32 LITT 1100-002 INTRO TO LITERATURE 35 LITT 1100-091 INTRO TO LITERATURE 22 LITT 1101-001 LITERARY METHODOLOGIES 33 LITT 1110001 INTRODUCTION TO FICTION 24 LITT 2101-001 EUROPEAN LITT II 27 LITT 2103-001 BRITISH LITERATURE II 36 LITT 2105-001 AMERICAN LITERATURE II 21 LITT 3105-001 MAl AUTHOR: GARCIA MARQUEZ 10 LITT 3110 001 MAlORAUTHORS: CHAUCER 19 LITT 3111-001 MA: THE BRONTES 30 LITT 3213-001 LITERATURE OF THE BIBLE 9 LITT 3215-001 20TH CEN LATIN AMER STRY 6 LITT 3230-001 RESTORATION, 18C BRIT 15 LITT 3635-001 ADV POETRY WRITING WRKSP 14 LITT 3636-001 ADV FICTION WRITING WRKSP 9 LITI 3711-001 FRENCH LITERATURE 4 LITT 3781-001 PRACTICUM IN LITERATURE 3 LITT4610-001 SENlORSEMINAR 17 Number of INDEPENDENT STUDIES 21

Languages: LANG 1231-001 BEGlNNlNG FRENCH II 18 LANG 1231-002 BEGIN1\TJNG FRENCH II 25 LANG 1241-001 BEGlNNlNG SPAJ\TJSH II 28 LANG 1241-002 BEGlNNlNG SPAJ\TJSH II 37 LANG 1702-001 INTRO TO LATIN II 3 LANG 2115-001 HISTORY ENGLISH LANGUAGE 34 LANG 2231-001 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II 17 LANG 2240-001 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II 35 LANG 2241-001 INTERMEDIATE SP ANlSH II 21 LANG 2270-001 INTERMED MOD GREEK I 12 LANG 2711-001INTEMED LATIN II 4 LANG 3710-001 ADVANCED LATIN Number of INDEPENDENT STUDIES 2

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2. GCourses a. Fall 1996

GAR 1150-001 EXPERIENCE OF LITT 28 GAR 3301-001 SPIRITUAL AUTOBIOGRAPHY 23 GEN 1102-001 WRITING IN THE ELEC AGE 18 GEN 1220-001 INTRODUCTION TO LATIN I 29 GEN 1230-001 BEGINNING FRENCH I 25 GEN 1230-002 BEGINNING FRENCH I 28 GEN 1240-001 BEGINNING SPANISH I 34 GEN 1240-002 BEGINNING SPANISH I 33 GEN 1240-003 BEGINNING SPANISH I 33 GIS 3154-001 ALIENATION: LIT & SOCIETY 32 Number of INDEPENDENT STUDIES 1

b. Spring 1997 GAR 1306-001 DAILY LIFE ANCIENT EGYPT 32 GAR 1341-001 IMAGES WOMEN IN SPAN LIT 27 GAR 2106-001 WOMEN WRITING ON AMERICA 30 GAR 2147-001 GREEK AND ROMAN COMEDY 32 GAR 2301-001 FRENCH NOVEL IN ENGLISH 10 GAR 2611-001 LATIN AMERICAN IDENTITIES 26 GEN 1020-001 RHETORIC & COMPOSITION 24 GEN 1102-001 WRITING IN THE ELEC AGE 17 GEN 1230-001 BEGINNING FRENCH I 11 GEN 1230-082 BEGINNING FRENCH I 12 GEN 1240-001 BEGINNING SPANISH I 50 Number of INDEPENDENT STUDIES 2

3. Litt/Lang. Faculty Preceptees: Corwin* 8 Dunn* 23 Grasso 22 Honaker* 15 Kantzios* 4 KinseIIa* 39 Madero* 5 Marthan* 7 Mench* 21 Myles* 24 Nelson 13 Tompkins 26

* Indicates Freshman Preceptors

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4. Declared and Undeclared LitlLangMajors as of February 14,1997

Declared Undeclared Total LITT 38 61 99 CRWT 8 15 23 EDUC 17 21 38 FREN 1 2 3 GRAD 18 18 PROF 4 4 SPAN 6 3 -----2

92 102 194

The number of LittlLang (Communications is excluded from this count) Majors continues to increase steadily. In 1995 it was 166 and in 1996, 178. The same trend holds true in the percentage ofLittlLang Majors campus wide.

5. LittlLang Graduation Figures Fall 1996: 14 Spring 1997 20

6. Placement of Graduates We don't have any formal mechanism to collect data about our Program

graduates. From the anecdotal evidence (some students do stay in touch with their former Professors) , we gather that they go into a diversity of occupations and into graduate school in_a variety of fields such as English, Library Science, Law, Comparative Literature, Creative Writing, Theater, Counseling .... The major career path is Teaching in K-12. We had even two Program graduates who taught this year, here at Stockton, LITT. and GEN Studies Courses. Some become, in their own right, playwrights or poets.

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Arts and Humanities

Li~erature and. Language

Eric.Frank Ganter Stefania Anna Gray Richard William Harvey IV Nakeishia Ann Knox Katherine E. LaBonney Charmaine S. Markowitz Edward J. McNamara Claire Obst Stacy M. Passalaqua Thea Rosendary John D. Ross Brian T. Scott Scott Robert Semet Nrr:c6le C Zamerovsky

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GerteraRussell Akerlind Mei:tndaAlin Allman ... jo~EiphB$ned.ict.·Amorelli DavidM. Babich· .. . Pall! ThdmasBollemoacher . RiJ~~rdJoseph~rari.da .. Geqygarine BucCine . Notma,V. Danes.ki, .... ::: Geqrg1ana X D'Aur1a .. . JarliegRiChard Feichthaler chi'istina Patricia Gerald Li~~Marie Giangeruso Nancy A. Giooons Kel;ley Anne Hall Phaon Stinson Hughes Lesa Ann Keener Modesta Jacqueline Lopez Tara Ann Mahoney Michelle Leigh Mills Lisa A. Miskura

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C. ADMISSIONS EFFORTS: This year the Program was present in all the 1996-1997 open houses. Tom

Kinsella, Ippokratis Kantzios, Lisa Honaker and Joseph Marthan represented the Program. I would like to thank Tom, Ippokratis and Lisa who volunteered to serve.

Each summer, the Program participates in the Freshmen Orientation and Preregistration, and in Transfer Student Orientation.

II. PROGRAM FACULTY A. Professional, Teaching and <::ommunity Activities ofLittlLang Faculty

Jay Corwin is Assistant Professor of Spanish. He has been invited, by Moscow State University, to a Conference in Russia (May 20-27, 1997). His book is in press; it will be available in September 1997.

Stephen Dunn is Professor of Creative Writing. "My book of poems Loosestrife (Norton) was published in September and was a finalist for The National Book Critics Circle Award. I finished a new book of prose pieces called Riffs & Reciprocities, which Norton will publish in April, 1998. Several of the pieces have been published or accepted for publication in Harper's, The Georgia Review, The Southern Review, and_The American Poetry Review, to name just a few journals. I gave readings of my work atIllinois College, The Vermont Studio Center, Idaho State University, SUNY Brockport, University of Montana, et.a1."

Norma Grasso is Associate Professor of Spanish. "Research in progress, and planned publications (probably a series of articles) on the following: a) "Gender Disguise" in Catalina de Erauso's Lieutenant Nun: Memoir of a Basque Transvestite in the New World. Erauso was a 16th century Spanish-Basque nun, soldier and gifted writer. Michele and Gabriel Stepto's superb translation of her autobiography was published last year (J 996) by Beacon Press in Boston. b) "Gender Politics" in Luisa Valenzuela's Change of Weapons (Argentina, 1985) and Rosario Castellano's Woman Who Knows Latin (Mexico, 1973). Both are prestigious Latin American writers, winners of major international awards for their literary works."

Lisa Honaker is Assistant Professor of British Literature. "Having completed my second year at Stockton, I am most pleased with my teaching

performance--in both General Studies and program courses--and with my contributions to planning, development and review of my program. My recent scholarship includes a co-authored paper delivered at a conference in March 1996 and the ongoing revision of my dissertation for publication as articles and eventually a book manuscript.

For the program, I have taught both service courses, Introduction to Literature and the British Literature II survey (one of my favorites), as well as upper-level courses in my field, Victorian Literature and Modem British Novel. I have designed two program courses: Turn of

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the Century (19th to 20th) Novel, a period course I taught in Spring 1996, and The Brontes, a major authors course because it was okayed for inclusion in the women's studies curriculum, to which I had been eager to contribute since my arrival at Stockton. Currently I am planning another program course, The Novel and Empire, which will be offered as the senior seminar ne:>."! fall.

For General Studies, I also designed a course that has proven quite popular: Horror Literature and Film. The Rhetoric and Composition Freshman Seminar course I taught this semester also produced the results I wanted, though not without a struggle. I will be teaching this course again in the fall with little revision.

My most recently scholarly vita item is in the composition field. In March 1996 I co­authored a paper, "The Perils ofIsolation: Renegotiating the Boundary between High School and College Writing," for presentation at the Conference on College Composition and Communication in Milwaukee. Since that conference, I have been at work revising my dissertation for eventual book publication as well as culling from it material for two separate articles. The production of at least one of these articles is my summer project.

I have gotten great satisfaction this year working with my program colleagues to revise the LiteratureiLanguage curriculum. We have added to the curriculum one new course, Sophomore Research. Anne Myles and I have provided the outline for this course in our discussions.

In addition to this curricular revision, I worked with Tom Kinsella and Anne Myles on our program's application for a new faculty line and with the program as a whole on our 5-year review. I also organized this year's Holiday LitiLang Workshop, preparing most of the food, and coordinated the menu for the Spring Workshop. In the fall, I was a reader for the Fyte! Armstrong Prize (best critical essay for a literature class). I read for this same contest last year as well as for the Virginia Woolf Prize for fiction."

Ippokratis Kantzios is Assistant Professor of Greek Language and Literature. He presented a paper at both the Spring and Fall Meetings of the Classical Association of

the Atlantic States. The papers were entitled "The Companions of Dido in the Mourning Fields," and "Changing Morphology and Vocabulary in Archaic Greek Iambus." Ippokratis was actively involved with the Greek Letters and Cultural Heritage Celebration last Fall.

Thomas Kinsella is Assistant Professor of British Literature. "Tom Kinsella taught Writing in the Electronic Age (GEN 1102) for the seventh time

during the spring. One of the original cohort of "Virtual Reality" courses, it remains Stockton's only WI course taught in computer labs. Kinsella also readjusted the essay/testing requirements for Restoration and Eighteenth-Century Literature: all assignments this past semester were due in­electropjc form.

Reviews done in past semesters were published during the year including Boswell: Citizen ojthe World, Man ojLetters, edited by Irma S. Lutig, The University Press of Kentucky, 1995 (for The Age oj Johnson); Accessing Antiquity: The Computerization oj Classical Studies, edited

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by Jon Solomon, The University of Arizona Press, 1993; The Vatican Virgil: a Masterpiece of Late Antique Art, by David H. Wright, University of California Press, 1993; Reading the Classics and Paradise Lost, by William M. Porter, University of Nebraska Press, 1993 (all for Classical World).

Kinsella's latest "research" project was completed last summer when he and David Carr, co-chairs of the Periodic Review Report: The Richard Stockton College, 1996, submitted the comprehensive college-wide review to the Middle States Association for Higher Education. It was accepted by Middle States and praised in November 1996.

Over the past two years Kinsella has also attended the annual Eastem Small College Computing Conference. In the fall of 1995 he took part in a panel presentation, with several colleagues, titled: "Investment in Quality & Excellence: Integrating Computer Technology and Multi-Media into the Curriculum"; in fall 1996 the panel discussion was titled: The Effects of Sexually-Oriented WWW Material in Open Computer Labs," again delivered with several colleagues. He will not present at the fall 1997 conference, held at Stockton, but he did act as referee for ComputerslWriting Pedagogy entries. In addition, in April 1996 he presented ''Boswell On-line: Is this Really a Good Thing?" at the NEMLA Conference in Montreal.

Over the summer he will attend a conference on Gender and CyberCulture (with Ken Tompkins). He is also researching and designing an on-line readings course for literature majors."

Tom was the recipient of the Faculty Distinguished Fellowship (Summer 97). The title of his project is: "Development of On-line Reading Courses in Literature."

The Program, and for that matter the College, owes much gratitude to Tom. He has been the lifeline of the Program. He is always there for his colleagues, ready to go, with grace, the extra mile.

Roberto Madero is Assistant Professor of Spanish

Joseph Marthan is Associate Professor of French and Program Coordinator (1996-1997).

He presented two papers: "Les Aspects politi que, economique et social de la France contemporaire" at the American

Association of Teachers of French Annual Meeting in Lyon, France, July 1996. "France in 1996: Update on Current Events" at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages Annual Meeting, in Philadelphia, November, 1996.

Fred Mench is Professor of Classics. He has been selected to serve on the Editorial Board of "De Imperatoribus Romanis: An

On-Line Encyclopedia of Roman Emperors". He was awarded an NEH Summer (97) Seminar Fellowship: "Culture in the Augustan Age" (University of Texas-Austin, June IS-August 1). Next Fall, he will be on Sabbatical to work on an ongoing project: "Historical Novels of Ancient Rome". Professor Mench is the Founder (1972) and continuing President of Classical Humanities Society of New Jersey, and Book Review Editor of "The Clarnical World" since 1983 .

. • Anne MyLes is Assistant Professor of i\merican Literature "Research and Writing:

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With the support of an R&PD stipend for summer 1997, I will be working on revising my dissertation manuscript, "Called Out: Languages of Dissent in Early America," for the Institute of Early American History and Culture (University of North Carolina Press). Two articles prepared with support of 1996 R&PD summer stipend:

''Dissent and the Frontier of Translation: Roger William's A Key into the Language of America" will appear in Possible Pasts: Becoming Colonial in Early America, ed. Robert Blair St. George (Cornell, forthcoming).

"Stranger Friend': John Woolman and Quaker Dissent," accepted for a volume of essays on Woolman edited by Michael Heller, currently being prepared for submission.

Conforence Participation: Session Chair, "Quaker Texts and Contexts in American Literature and Culture,"

Northeast Modern Language Association, Philadelphia, April 5, 1997.

Presented Paper, "Crevecoeur's Sketches of Eighteenth-Century America: Revolution and the Rhetoric of Estrangement," Northeast Modern Language Association, Philadelphia, AprilS, 1997.

Attended, Modern Language Association, Washington, D.C., December 27-30, 1996.

l'rofossional Development

Attended the Southern NJ Alliance Meeting of the New Jersey Project, Camden County College, March 21, 1997.

Will attend the New Jersey Project's 1997 Summer Institute, New Brunswick, NJ, June 5-9,1997.

Community Activities

Delivered the 50th Annual Lecture of the John Woolman Memorial Association, " 'Stranger Friend': John Woolman and Quaker Dissent," Mount Holly, N.J., September 28, 1996.

Teaching: New Courses Taught in 1996-1997

LITT: LITT 3621, Early American Literature GENS: GAR 2106, Women Writing on America

New Courses Planned for 1997-1998 LITT: LITT 2---, Contemporary American Fiction; LITT 3---, Whitman and Dickinson GENS:GEN 1120, Rhetoric and Composition (new for me)

Revisions to Existing Course

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Changed from Norloll Anthology to Heath Anthology as the basic text for LITT 2104, American Literature I (the Heath is an innovative, muticulturally-oriented anthology favored by the most active and progressive teachers/scholars of American literature)"

Ann was centrally involved in designing the new program curriculum. She is an actlve member of Women's Studies faculty.

I would like to thank Anne for her willingness to assist this summer with the transfer transcript reviews during "Transfer Allocation Days."

Jeanne-Andree Nelson is Associate Professor of French. "Published article in refereed journal:)'So Close to Closure: The Selling of Desire in

Glengarry Glen Ross by David Mamet", Essays in TheaterlEtudes Theatrales. Vol. 14, No.2, Spring 1996

Grant: Faculty Research and Professional Development Grant for poetry translation, summer

1996, Richard Stockton College

Theatrical activity and community services "The Dune's Poem", an address on the occasion of Stephen Dunn's reading of

Loosestrife, Lecture Hall, The Richard Stockton College of New Jersey September 27, 1996

Directed Come and Go by Samuel Beckett, and The Applicant by Harold Pinter. The Experimental Theater, May 2, 1997

Pedagogical innovation The Beginning French course, GEN 1230, which is usually taught in the Fall, was

offered this spring as part of an experiment in a new methodology involving long distance teaching through interactive TV, Students from the Technical Institute in Cape May interacted with Stockton students in our classroom."

Ken Tompkins is Professor of Literature He was Program Representative on the ARHU Dean Search Committee. Ken has been

elected Program Coordinator (1997-1998).

B. Committee Participation (1996-1997) ofLittlLang. Faculty

1. Faculty Assembly Standing Committees a. Steering Committee:

Tom Kinsella (Norma Grasso was elected when Tom's term expired) Fred Mench

b. Library and Media Services: Anne Myles

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c. Research and Professional Development Joseph Marthan

d. Student Services Fred Mench, Chair Lisa Honaker Anne Myles

2. Other Committees a. Campus Hearing Board

Anne Myles b. ARHU Faculty Reyiew Committee

Nanna Grasso c. Search committee for the new ARHU Dean

Ken Tompkins

m. Program Evaluation A. Program Activities

l. End oftenn Parties, Readings and Plays, Awards and Program Distinction We had, in what has become, a cherished tradition, two memorable end oftenn parties

(December 13, 1996 and May 7, 1997). Both were high-spirited with plenty offood for the soul and the body. These parties are unique and festive opportuJ1ities for Faculty and students to meet and mingle. This year they had a special flavor thanks to the organizational, creative design and culinary skilis of Lisa Honaker. She prepared a Banquet Plato would have attended ifhe were a Stocktonian.

We gave Program Distinction, and more awards and Prizes than ever before. The Program is extremely grateful to the generous donors who endowed the prizes and to the readers and judges.

At the Fall Party, as in the past, Ken Tompkins, our local Bard,' delivered his inspirational Readings to an appreciative audience.

In the Spring before the Party, we were served an intellectual aperitif We were entertained to a theatrical perfonnance which has become now the Program Rite of Spring. Two delightful short, but long in content, plays (Come and Go by Samuel Beckett and the Applicant by Harold Pinter) were staged. Jeanne-Andree Nelson, our Program Colleague, directed both plays acted by our students for a full-packed Experimental Theater. We would like to thank both the director and the actors for their time and talent.

Just after the performance, we had Poetry Readings. Our inspired Program students, visited by the Muse, read their own Poetry.

This Spring, Program Distinction recipients were offered Borders' gift certificates. We heeded Ken's suggestion which made sense: Before, students were given books from the Faculty's libraries. With Borders' certificates, their choice, within budget, is virtually limitless.

2. Speaker:

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On March 12, we had a presentation by Dr. Nancy Kaplan, the English Consultant. Her talk, "Making Change", was, mirabile dictu, attended by a standing room audience of students, and this despite the late hour. What a change!

3. Academic Passport Concept: To quote the working proposal, circulated under the auspices of both the College and

Faculty Assembly Presidents, "The heart ofthe Academic Passport concept is to design a process whereby Stockton students will be able to present employers, graduate schools and/or advanced training programs with an instantly recognizable career portfolio of their intellectual skill level attainment. "

The Dean assembled an Ad Hoc divisional committee to identifY, within ARHU, the skills and competencies Program Majors should acquire in the course of their studies. Fred Mench and Joseph Marthan represented the Program on this committee. They wrote, after consultation with the faculty, the Program contribution.

4. Request For An Additional Faculty: The English Track, under the sponsorship of the Program, applied to the Central

Administration for a line in English. The application went successfully through the first stages, but, unfortunately, didn't make the final round.

5. College Major Day: On February 25, the Program had an information stand for this college wide event.

We distributed Program Literature a11d answered queries from prospective Majors and Minors. The Coordinator would like to thank Fred and Ippokratis who helped to staff the tables.

B. Issues, Goals and Objectives This year was a turning point for our Program. We had the Five-Year Review. Two

consultants evaluated our Program, Dr. Ada Ortuzar-Young for tl1e Language Tracks and Dr. Nancy Kaplan for the other Tracks. Before the Consultants' visits (February 28 and March 12 respectively), the Literature, Creative Writing, Classics (Greek and Latin), Spanish and French Tracks produced each a Self-Study. I refer the reader to the Self-Studies for detailed Track analysis.

I would like then to address, from my own perspective, some issues and offer some suggestions.

The Program Faculty Review: This year, we instituted a more streamlined process to the Program evaluation. Since the

college timetable for candidates for reappointment is tight, we solicited evaluation material from them in early September. The candidates thus have more tin1e to assemble their dossier, and for the committee to read it and eventually consult them before it meets formally. I suggest we fine-tune the evaluation process to make it least stressful and most helpful to our Junior colleagues, to advise, and mentor, them earnestly all along the way to the last reality check when they come up for tenure.

Outside Speakers:

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Both Tom Kinsella and Anne Myles asked for funds to bring eminent outside speakers. We do hope these requests materialize. For many years we had altogether two speakers only (prince and Kaplan). In light of the standing room audience of students we had at both talks, having, on a regular basis, speakers on campus makes even a more telling case.

New Literature Curriculum: A look at Stockton earlier catalogues gives an idea of the transformations the Program

curriculum underwent in form and in substance. These successive changes are indeed a healthy sign of a dynamic faculty, abreast in her field, willing to adapt, and adopt a new curriculum reflective of the discipline. A case in point, alluded to before, is how some in the Literature Faculty are benefiting our students with their expertise in computer instruction. However, while we believe that each new curriculum will serve better our students, we are not making a convincing case for dismissing the former one. The Literature Self-Study is earnest about this:

~ . .

« The long term benefits of maintaining such conservative educational programs are not clear.» (p.ll). There is no yardstick.

While I share the enthusiasm of my Literature Colleagues for the new curriculum, we should devise strategies to evaluate it. Within a 4-year period, when the Program Graduates its first students under the new curriculum, we should have in place milestones and benchmarks for assessment and comparison. We may have then a better idea of what works and what does not and be better equipped to make revisions.

P:rogramGraduates: We don't have yet any mechanism to keep track of our Program Graduates. Some do

contact informally their former instructors. However, we lose touch with most of them. Let me reiterate Fred Mench's call, in his 1993-94 Coordinator's report for the follow-up and outreach of Program Graduates in order to create among them an esprit de corps and establish

. networks. Foremost we should draw a current listing of Program Alumni and find ways to update it.

We could revive After Word. Karen Pysnik, its founding Editor, did a good job but the Newsletter ceased publication after she graduated. To give it more continuity and more stability, the Program would ask for a standing budget item for a student worker to staff the position and pay production costs.

We could explore the possibility of class reunions, invite graduates who live in the region to our end of semester parties, to talks by outside speakers ... I suggest we visit this issue next year.

English Minor: Another issue worth revisiting is the establishment of an English Minor. We had this year

several inquiries fiomstudents,across the Divisions, interested to pursue an English Minor.

Planning of Program Courses:

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Even a cursory look at past schedules will show that we didn't do a very good job in planning the course sequences. Beyond the required core, it seems as we offered other courses on ad hoc basis, to suit more Faculty inclinations than student needs.

Some core courses are overfilled because there are not enough sections. Next Fall Schedule which reflects the new curriculum has a major flaw. Only one section ofLiterarv Methodologies is offered while four of Intra to Literature are. Yet the first one is required, the second is now an elective. Literature Methodologies is already closed. What are the Freshmen, and Transfer students who register this summer for Fall courses to do?

Language Tracks: We have received both Ortuzar-Young's and Kaplan's reports in early and late May

respectively. As of this writing, I had a glance at Kaplan's report. But it was enough to realize that it is a rich and a detailed one. It deserves a very close reading. The Program will respond to it in another document.

By all accounts, Ortuzar-Young's report was encompassing, insightful and studded with suggestions. Both her report and the responses were forwarded to the Dean and distributed to Program Faculty.

I would like to take up or expand some points:

Dr. Ortuzar-Young has called for the establishment ora Language Resource Center. Even if Stockton were to build one, our language students, in the meantime, have no place on campus to meet. The conversion of the Language Lab took us by surprise. At the last Program Meeting on Apri110, 1997, none of the Program Faculty, all were present, was aware of such a change. The Language Faculty was never consulted. If we were, we would have asked, even after the':--' removal of the booths, to save it, along some of Jeanne-Andree Nelson's suggestions in her April 14, 1997 memo to the Dean, at least as a space for our Language students to gather and converse in the target language, to read foreign language magazines, and to serve as an anchor for eventual Language Clubs. It would be, in the words of our colleague « a unique place for them to get acquainted with foreign languages and cultures»

In her report, the Language Consultant made a forceful case against cancellation of advanced classes due to low enrollment and against the ill consequences of offering, instead, Independent Studies. She called convincingly for additional Spanish Faculty, a specialist in Language Pedagogy and Technology. In my response, I endorsed strongly both recommendations. However, in the conclusion, I underlined that while the Administrative support may be crucial for the establishment of Language Programs, it will fall short « unless we support it from within from our own inner resources. That is, each one of us is called to invest his/her very best in these Programs and ask whether he/she is doing enough to make viable». To make our call for help more audible and more credible, we have first to be ourselves more credible. Otherwise, to say the least, we will not be taken seriously.

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Let me advance some modest and, what I believe, sensible suggestions. They derive from the premise that the emergence and viability of a Language Program depend on a solid foundation and nurturing of basic language classes. The pool of Advanced Language, and Literature, students will not come from a spontaneous generation. They have to be Stockton homegrown, and more so for French which lacks a captive francophone population. They will come from Intermediate Language II , and further down, from the beginning levels. Thus, any separation, or hierarchy, between Beginning and Advanced Language, and between Language and Literature, is artificial and detrimental. The essential key to Program creation is retention. As they stand now, the Language Tracks have a pyramidal structure: a large quantitative basis which dwindles exponentially, as it gets higher, to near extinction. The challenge is to modifY this pattern and make the top of the pyramid somewhat thicker.

To consolidate the 4-semester language sequence: - There should be absolutely no break in the sequence. It affects students whose Majors require a Language. It is most damaging to the Language Tracks, Concentration and Minor. Such a break creates a bottleneck and puts in jeopardy any chance to build a Language Program. A case in point. In French, we offer Beginning I and Intermediate I in the Fall, and Beginning II and Intermediate II in the Spring. In this case, students take classes sequentially. However, several times, GEN 1230 was, additionally, offered in the Spring. The French Track lost forever all those students, tens of them. Therefore, offering knowingly, and by choice, GEN 1230 in the Spring is, to put it mildly, unacceptable (in the Spring of '93 there was a worst case scenario: a section of Lang 1231 was dropped in favor ofGEN 1230).

All Language Faculty, regardless of rank or seniority, should get into the trenches and get involved in the teaching of the 4-semester language sequence. It is in the front-line of this sequence that the battle for the establishment of a Language Major is fought and may eventually be won. Furthermore, all Language Faculty should share - equally- the staffing of this sequence. Then, the hiring of adjuncts makes sense if it is done for the only purpose of expanding offerings and not as a way out for the regular, particularly the Senior, Faculty from the teaching of basic Language Classes. The new Dean, in his talk to the ARHU Faculty, made a point crystal clear. He said that all Language Faculty ("no exception" in his own words) should get involved in the teaching of basic language courses.

-Language Faculty and the Literature Track The relationship between the Language and the Literature Tracks is uneven. While Language Faculty teach Literature Track courses, Literature Faculty cannot teach Language courses. Most of Literature Track courses taught by the Language Faculty could be taught, too, by the Literature Faculty or by the four Associated Faculty .. Therefore, the Language Tracks are far .. better served if the Language Faculty focus their offerings, and efforts, on Language Track courses. Furthermore, courses required for the concentration and the :Minor should be taught first, and at this point, even exclusively. Otherwise, we dilute and, in some cases, empty out the requisite Advanced Language and Literature classes.

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There are other measures we could take. However, the above ones, are the indispensable cbndition to make any strong case for a substantial Administrative support.

-" .'

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[lJ MEMORANDUM [lJ THE RICHARD STOCKTON COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY II] MEMORANDUM [lJ

PLEASE ANNOUNCE TO YOUR CLASSES

TO: FACULTY

FROM: Stephen Dunn

DATE: April 29, 1997

RE: CREATIVE WRITING CONTEST

The winner of the 1997 Jeannette Gottlieb Award for excellence in poetry writing is colleen Conroy. The judge of this contest was poet Gregory Djanikian.

Honorable Mention went to Jeremy Stevens and Matthew McDevitt.

The willner of the 1997 Michael Lanza Award for excellence in poetry writing is Nicole Ross. The judge of this contest was poet Gregory Djanikian_

Honorable Mention went to Barbara Ott.

The winner of the 1997 Miriam Paolella Award for excellence in fiction writing is Benjamin Cruzan. The judge of this contest was novelist and short story writer Jack Driscoll.

The winner of the 1997 Janet Taillie Kowalski Award for" exc"eflence in creative fiction writing is Melinda Allman. The judge of this contest was writer Jack Driscoll.

The winner of the 1997 Janet Taillie Kowalski Award for excellence in creative nonfiction writing is Jessica L. Thomas. The judge of this contest was nonfiction writer Kathryn Watterson.

Runner-up went to Michele M. Stevens.

The Virginia woolf Award for Best Essay Excellance went to Matthew Merlino

Congratulatio"ns!

The winners will receive their awards at the senior reception which will take place May 2, 1997, at 1:30PM in room the N-llS.

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Page 26: TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU M ~ 1~

n:n MEMORANDUM n:n THE RICHARD STOCKTON COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY n:n MEMORANDUM n:n

OFFICE OF ARTS AND HUMANITIES'

MEMORANDUM

TO: Lm/LANG FACULTY

FROM: Literature/Language Secretary

DATE: December 12, 1996

RE: Fyte-Armstrong Contest

Please announce to your classes that Matthew Merlino is the winner of the Fyte­Armstrong Contest.

Also announce to your classes that the big bash will be held Friday, December 13, 1996 at 4:30PM in room G-20S.

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Pomona, New Jersey 08240 (609)652-1776

Page 27: TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU M ~ 1~

The Campus Community is invited to hear

MAKING CHANGE!!

A Presentation by

Nancy Kaplan Associate Professor in the School of Communications Design at the University of Baltimore

Wednesday, 12 March 8pm in the Townsend Residential Life Center

The author of numerous articles on hypertext, culture, and the Internet, Professor Kaplan will speak on these issues

Refreshments will be served

Page 28: TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU M ~ 1~

... :::

THE RICHARD STOCKTON COllEGE OF NJ DiVision of Arts and Humanities

Date: January 25, 1996

To: Robert REGAN, Dean, ARHU

From: Joseph VJARTHAN, ARHU

He: Incoming Meeting

I had an interestiny conversation with my colleague, Phyllis Ahlsted, on Languages and Technology.

I learned that you were going to have a meeting with her and Vice President Nazzaro on the future of the Language Lab. in F210. I would like to participate in that meeting.

I would appreciate if you ]{eep me posted. Thank you.

cc: Phyllis AHLSTED, Director, Media Center.

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Page 29: TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU M ~ 1~

Date:

TO: FROM: SUBJECT:

April 14, 1997

Robert Regan, Dean ARHU Jeanne-Andree LITTfLANG Language Laborator:'

From its ver:' begim1ing, the language laborator:' has been operating at

minimum efficienc~'. First because classes ,,,ere held in that room, and

second because, after class, the doors ,,,ere locked. You have expressed

concern in the past regarding the lack of use oft11e lab, and other faculty haye

expressed their displeasure about this fact as ,,,ell. I too regret that all the lab

equipment remains idle, so I am asking you to make sure that the lab stay

open Monda~' through Friday trom 8:30 a.m. until 6:00 p.111. and on Saturday

from 10:00 a.m. to 2 :00 p.111. Students '''ill tinally be able to sit in the lab,

listen to their tapes, do their home\\wk, and make copies of master tapes

\"hen they need too.

In the future I ,,,ill request funds to build a collection of foreign films

on video tape, as 'Yell as a collection offoreign magazines and audio

cassettes. The doors ,,,ill all"ays be open to receive students, and the lab ,,,ill

be a unique place for them to get acquainted ,,,ith foreign languages and

cultures,

cc: LITTfLANG t:1Clllty

Page 30: TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU M ~ 1~

lfll MEMORANDUM lfll THE RICHARD STOCKTON COLLEGE OF NEW JERSEY 53 MEMORANDUM [.il

Professor Jeanne A ee Ne;r;;,~

Robert A. Regan ~~I.Y~ TO:

FROM:

DATE: April 15, 1997

SUBJECT: F-205

Thank you for your memo of April 12, 1997, and your concern for Lan9uage tutorial instruction. As you know, there has been no scheduled use of this room for several terms. I appreciate the direction your request intends, however, there is another direction and we are moving toward an entirely different use of this space.

The audio equipment will move to the Media Center and we will install a 24-computer station classroolll for the use of ARHU program courses and related labs. Obviously, this includes Language Study, but it does not preserve a "Language" connotation for the space. It will be an "ARHU" computer"elassroom.

I have already flagged it a,? a budget priority for next year; however, the space will be taken over soon by an institute for training teacher, E.T.T.C. Vice President I<esselman is leading this innovative activity for Stockton and will take F-205 during the summer to begin this activity until other space becomes available. At that time, we will have a Computer Classroom.

I suggest that the Language tutoring budget and schedule be maintained as is for next fall. Hopefully, the new use will become available before the end of the year or by the Spring '98 term.

Iw cc: L/L Faculty

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Page 31: TO: Robert Regan, Dean, ARHU M ~ 1~

SPRING 1997 .' ..

THE RICHARD STOCKTON COLLEGE • L1TERATURE.AND LANGUAGE PROGRAM

presents

• Come anI Co

by Samuel UcclwU

The Applicant by Harold Pinter

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Friday, May 2, 1997 at 4:00 PM in the Experimental Tneater

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