The Romantic Poets

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The Romantic Poets. William Wordsworth romantic poetry. William Wordsworth principal poem : We are seven Lines Written in Early Spring To the cuckoo I Wondered lonely as a cloud The Solitary Reaper - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • The Romantic Poets

  • William Wordsworth romantic poetry

  • William Wordsworth

    principal poem We are seven Lines Written in Early Spring To the cuckoo I Wondered lonely as a cloud The Solitary Reaper Intimations or Immortality The Prelude

  • I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud----William WordsworthI wandered lonely as a cloudThat floats on high oer vales and hills,When all at once I saw a crowd,A host, of golden daffodils;Beside the lake, beneath the tress,Fluttering and dance in the breeze.

    Continuous as the stars that shineAnd twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in the never-ending lineAlong the margin of a bay;Ten thousand say I at a glance,Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.The waves beside them danced; but theyOutdid the sparkling waves in glee;A poet could not but be gay,In such a jocund company;I gazed and gazed but little thoughtWhat wealth the show to me had brought:For oft, when on my couch I lieIn vacant or in pensive mood,They flash upon that inward eyeWhich is the bliss of solitude;And then my heart with pleasure fills,And dance with the daffodils.

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  • GlossaryVales:valleysFlutter:move up and down or form side to sideTwinkle:shine form bright to faintSprightly:cheerful, activeGlee:delightJocund:merry, cheerfulOft:oftenVacant:thoughtless pensive:melancholic, sadly thoughtful

  • Questions1. What is the recurrent central image in this poem?2. What does the persona feel at the end of the poem?3. Write in a few sentences your understanding of What wealth the show to me had brought.4. Explain in a few words that inward eye/Which is the bliss of solitude.5. This poem is considered by many the most anthologized poem in English literature, and one that takes us to the core of Wordsworths poetic beliefs. How is the core manifested?6. What is the relation between man and nature?

  • I wandered lonely as a cloudIt revisits the familiar subjects of nature and memory, this time with a particularly (simple) spare, musical eloquence. Plot: the poet's wandering and his discovery of a field of daffodils by a lake, the memory of which pleases him and comforts him when he is lonely, bored, or restless.

    Form: The four six-line stanzas of this poem follow (a quatrain + a couplet) rhyme scheme: ABABCC. Each line is metered in iambic tetrameter.

  • I wandered lonely as a cloudI wandered lonely as a cloudThat floats on high oer vales and hills,When all at once I saw a crowd,A host of golden daffodils;Beside the lake, beneath the trees,Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.

  • Continuous as the stars that shine,And twinkle on the Milky Way,They stretched in never-ending lineAlong the margin of a bay:Ten thousand saw I at a glance,Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.

  • The waves beside them danced; but theyOutdid the sparkling waves in glee:A poet could not but be gay,In such a jocund company:I gazed and gazed but little thoughtWhat wealth the show to me had brought: :

  • For oft, when on my couch I lieIn vacant or in pensive mood,They flash upon that inward eyeWhich is the bliss of solitude;And then my heart with pleasure fillsAnd dances with the daffodils.

  • The Solitary ReaperBEHOLD her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland Lass! Reaping and singing by herself; Stop here, or gently pass! Alone she cuts and binds the grain, And sings a melancholy strain; O listen! for the Vale profound Is overflowing with the sound.

  • No Nightingale did ever chauntMore welcome notes to weary bandsOf travellers in some shady haunt,Among Arabian sands:A voice so thrilling ne'er was heardIn spring-time from the Cuckoo-bird,Breaking the silence of the seasAmong the farthest Hebrides.

  • Will no one tell me what she sings?--Perhaps the plaintive numbers flowFor old, unhappy, far-off things,And battles long ago:Or is it some more humble lay,Familiar matter of to-day?Some natural sorrow, loss, or pain,That has been, and may be again?

  • Whate'er the theme, the Maiden sangAs if her song could have no ending;I saw her singing at her work,And o'er the sickle bending;I listen'd, motionless and still;And, as I mounted up the hill,The music in my heart I bore,Long after it was heard no more.

  • Behold her, single in the field, Yon solitary Highland Lass! Reaping and singing by herself; Stop here, or gently pass! Alone she cuts and binds the grain, And sings a melancholy strain; O listen! for the vale profound Is overflowing with the sound.

  • No nightingale did ever chaunt More welcome notes to weary bands Of travellers in some shady haunt, Of travellers in some shady haunt, No sweeter voice was ever heard In spring - time from the cuckoo - bird, Breaking the silence of the seas Among the farthest Hebrides.

  • Will no one tell me what she sings? Perhaps the plaintive numbers flow For old, unhappy, far - off things, And battles long ago: Or is it some more humble lay, Familiar matter of to - day? Some natural sorrow, loss, or pain, That has been, and may be again!

  • Whate`er the theme, the maiden sang As if her song could have no ending; I saw her singing at her work, And o`er the sickle bending; I listen`d, till I had my fill; And, as I mounted up the hill, The music in my heart I bore Long after it was heard no more.

  • Solitary Reaper 1252In 1803 Wordsworth, his sister Dorothy, and Coleridge visited Scotland. Dorothy wrote: It was harvest-time, and the fields were quietly might I say pensively? enlivened by small companies of reapers. It is not uncommon in the more lonely parts of the Highlands to see a single person so employed. The following poem was suggested to William by a beautiful sentence in Thomas Wilkinsons Tour of Scotland. Wilkinsons sentence was, Passed a female who was reaping alone; she sung in Erse as she bended over her sickle; - the sweetest human voice I ever heard; her strains were tenderly melancholy, and felt delicious, long after they were heard no more.

  • Solitary ReaperUsing simple language, Wordsworth, in only four stanzas, paints a clear picture, involves us in a mysterious musical experience, stirs our emotions, stimulates our imagination, and suggests some ideas.Stanza 1 suggests loneliness of one human being in the vastness of a Highland vale. Her song dominates the sweeping landscape.

  • Stanza 2 two effective bird images communicate to us the startled, unexpected delight the song gave the poet, a thrill comparable to that of weary travelers of the Arabian desert suddenly hearing the song of the nightingale, suggesting a nearby oasis, or of cold Northerners overjoyed by the cuckoos cheerful announcement of the arrival at last of spring.