Symantec Internet Security Threat Report 2014 - Volume 19

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The 2014 Internet Security Threat Report gives an overview of global threat activity for the past year based on data from Symantec’s Global Intelligence Network.

Transcript of Symantec Internet Security Threat Report 2014 - Volume 19

  • 1
  • Agenda 2 2013: The Year of Mega Breach1 Targeted Attack Campaigns on the Rise2 The Evolution of Malware3 Mobile = Danger4 Vulnerabilities Continue to Facilitate Attacks5 Future Trend: Internet of Things6
  • Threat Landscape in 2013 3 Cyberespionage Privacy Malicious Insider Ransomware Data Breaches Mobile Internet of Things
  • Mega Breaches 4 2013 was the Year of the Mega Breach Breaches Identities Exposed Breaches >10M 2011 208 232M 5 2013 253 552M 8 2012 165 93M 1
  • Timeline of Mega Breaches 5 Timeline of Data Breaches, 2013 Source: Symantec 43 12 3 53 23 6 8 0.3 0.8 159 113 130 24 17 19 15 15 15 37 17 22 26 20 26 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 J F M A M J J A S O N D IDENTITIESEXPOSED(Millions) NUMBEROFINCIDNETS INCIDENTS IDENTITIES EXPOSED (Millions) 8 of the top 10 breaches were of more than 10 million identities Number of identities exposed were 4 times greater than 2012
  • Causes of Breaches 6 Top Causes of Data Breach, 2013 Source: Symantec Hackers Accidentally Made Public Theft or Loss of Computer or Drive Insider Theft Unknown Fraud 34% 29% 27% 6% 2% 2% 87 72 69 15 6 4 253TOTAL Number of Incidents Average number of identities exposed per data breach for hacking incidents was approximately 4.7 million Theft or loss + accidental breaches accounted for 56% of data breach incidents
  • Breaches by Sector 7 Data Breaches by Sector, 2013 Source: Symantec Data Breaches by Sector, Percent of Identities Exposed, 2013 Source: Symantec Healthcare, education and the public sectors accounted for 58% of all data breaches But, the retail, computer software and financial sectors accounted for 77% of all identities exposed in 2013 12% Government 7% Accounting 5% Retail 4% Computer Software Other 12%Healthcare 44% Education 16% 3% Financial 3% 3% 3% Transportation Insurance Hospitality Retail 30% Computer Software 16% Information Technology Financial 19% Hospitality Telecom Accounting Healthcare Other 4% 4% 1% 1% 2% 2% Social Networking 9%
  • Breaches: What Was Lost? 8 Real Names Birth Dates Government ID Numbers (Social Security) Home Address Medical Records Phone Numbers Financial Information Email Addresses User Names & Passwords Insurance 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10
  • Targeted Attacks 9
  • Increase in Targeted Attacks 10 +91% Increase in targeted attack campaigns 2012 2013
  • Defining an Attack Campaign Show clear evidence that subject and target were deliberately selected Contain at least 3 or 4 strong correlations to other emails topic, sender address, source IP address, etc. Sent on the same day or across multiple days 11 A series of emails that:
  • Targeted Attack Campaigns 12 2011 2012 2013 Email per Campaign Recipient/Campaign 78 122 29 61 111 23 Campaigns Duration of Campaign 165 408 779 4 days 3 days 8.3 days
  • Targeted Industries 13 Top 10 Industries Targeted in Spear-Phishing Attacks, 2013 Source: Symantec Public Administration (Gov.) Services Professional Services Non-Traditional Manufacturing Finance, Insurance & Real Estate Transportation, Gas, Communications, Electric Wholesale Retail Mining Construction 16% 15 14 13 13 6 5 2 1 1
  • Targeted Organization by Size 14 Spear Phishing Attacks by Size of Targeted Organization, 2011 - 2013 Source: Symantec 50% 50% 39% 18% 31% 30% 100% 0 2011 2012 2013 1,501 to 2,500 1,001 to 1,500 501 to 1,000 251 to 500 1 to 250 2,501+ Employees 50% 50% 61%
  • Most Likely to be Targeted 15 Executive Assistant at a large mining company JohnDoe@drillanddig.com Attacker Re: Order Payment Please click on this executable to see your order information.
  • Risk of Being Targeted by Job Role 16 Personal Assistant (Executive Assistant) High Medium Low Media Senior Management Sales C-Level Recruitment R&D Risk Risk of Job Role Impact by Targeted Attack Sent by Spear-Phishing Email Source: Symantec
  • Risk of Being Targeted by Industry 17 Ratio of Organization in an Industry Impacted by Target Attack Sent by Spear-Phishing Email Source: Symantec High Medium Low Risk Mining Public Administration (Government) Manufacturing Wholesale Transportation, Communications, Electric, Gas & Sanitary Services Finance, Insurance & Real Estate Services Non-Traditional Construction Agriculture, Forestry & Fishing 2.7 3.1 3.2 3.4 3.9 4.8 6.6 11.3 12.0 1 in
  • Risk of Being Targeted by Industry Size 18 Ratio of Organization Targeted by Industry Size Sent by Spear-Phishing Email Source: Symantec High Medium Risk 2,500+ 1,501-2,500 1,001-1,500 501-1,000 251-500 1-250 2.3 2.9 2.9 3.8 4.3 5.2 1 in
  • Word Cloud: Spear Phishing Attacks 19 Most frequently occurring words used in targeted spear phishing email attacks throughout 2013
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  • Vulnerabilities 23
  • Zero-Day Vulnerabilities 24 13 15 9 12 14 8 14 23 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Zero-Day Vulnerabilities, Annual Total, 2006 - 2013 Source: Symantec 23 zero-day vulnerabilities discovered in 2013 Increase from 14 in 2012 More zero-day vulnerabilities discovered in 2013 than in any year since we started tracking More zero-days in 2013 than in past two years combined
  • Website Vulnerabilities 25 Scanned Websites With Vulnerabilities 53% 78% +25% pts 2012 2013 1 IN 8 sites had critical unpatched vulnerabilities
  • Malicious Websites With so many vulnerable websites, cybercriminals dont need to set up own websites to host malware 26 New Unique Malicious Web Domains 56,158 74,001 74,001 -24%2013 2012 2011
  • Web-based Attacks Web-based attacks continue to grow 27 Web Attacks Blocked Per Day 568,700 464,100 190,000 +23% 2013 2012 2011
  • Ransomware 28
  • FakeAV depended on fear to work When everyone knows its fake, there is no fear and the scam fails. 29 Precursor to Ransomware
  • 30 Cybercriminals moved to ransomware Fear of arrest Simple and (for bad guys) safe method of receiving fine At $100-$400 a victim, its very profitable From FakeAV to Ransomware
  • 31 Ransomware Ransomware exploded globally in 2013 With only online payment options limiting its reach With only 1.5 million Internet-connected computers, even the Palestine Territories is a big enough target for criminals
  • Ransomwares Growth 32 in Ransomware attacks in 2013 112 107 138 141 178 189 286 421 625 419 861 660 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 J F M A M J J A S O N D Ransomeware Over Time, 2013 Source: Symantec 500% increase
  • Ransomware Turns Vicious When people stop fearing ransomware? Cryptolocker happens! Cryptolocker most prevalent in threat category called ransomcrypt No pretense of a fine Must pay to get your files back 33
  • Ransomcrypt Cybercriminals use cryptocurrencies when doing business with each other Theyd like to make victims use them, too 34
  • Ransomcrypt: Some Perspective 35 Number of Attacks Still Small In December, just 0.2 percent of all ransomware was CryptoLocker Threat is Not New Trojan.Gpcoder (May 2005) Trojan.Ransomcrypt (June 2009) What is New? Online payment methods Good encryption Cryptolocker uses RSA 2048 Encryption Poised for Growth
  • Mobile = Danger 36
  • Mobile Threats Android remains the platform of choice for malware authors 37 Android Symbian Windows Number of Threats 57 1 1 Percent of Threats 97% 2% 2% 0 0% Platform iOS Mobile Threats: Malicious Code by Platform, 2013 Source: Symantec
  • Mobile Malware Creation of new mobile malware slowed as malware authors focused on improving existing malware Average number of variants per family in 2012 was 1:38 Increased to 1:57 in 2013 38 Android Mobile Malware Families Average Number of Variant Per Family 57 57 103 38 2013 2013 -45% +50% 2013 2013