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  • Sustainable Waste:Not an Oxymoron P6

    WASTE AS A RESOURCE P15

    OVERSEAS EXCHANGE P20

    NEW LGMA BOARD P22

    EXCHANGE is a quarterly magazine published by the Local Government Management Association (LGMA) of British Columbia. Its about sharing information, exchanging ideas on best practices, enhancing professional development and building networks. Reach us at www.lgma.ca.

    EXCHANGE is a quarterly magazine published by the Local Government Management Association (LGMA) of British Columbia. Its about sharing information, exchanging ideas on best practices, enhancing professional development and building networks. Reach us at www.lgma.ca. SUMMER 2016

  • VANCOUVER OFFICE

    1616808 Nelson Street Box 12147 Nelson Square Vancouver, BC V6Z 2H2 T: 604.689.7400 F: 604.689.3444Toll Free: 1.800.665.3540

    KELOWNA OFFICE

    2011456 St. Paul StreetKelowna, BC V1Y 2E6T: 250.712.1130F: 250.712.1180

    www.younganderson.ca

    Sharing information and expertise helps build strong, sustainable communities. Young Anderson is proud to support professional development opportunities for municipalities and regional districts.

  • Promoting Professional Management &

    Leadership Excellence in Local Government 1

    UpdateIn this Issue 2Presidents Report 3Executive Directors Report 4Case of Interest 5 Members Page 22Our Town 24

    Professional DevelopmentTips & Tactics: Sustainable 19Waste Management

    Capilano Universitys 20th 21Anniversary

    Programs & Events 23

    Exchange is the magazine for members of the Local Government Management Association of British Columbia. Exchange is distributed quarterly to over 900 members of the LGMA, as well as Mayors and Regional District Chairs.

    Exchange is printed on Sappi Flo, an FSC Certifi ed 10% post-consumer recycled paper at Island Business Print Group.

    LGMA Offi ce:7th Floor620 View StreetVictoria, BC V8W 1J6Telephone: 250.383.7032Fax: 250.383.4879Email: offi ce@lgma.caWeb: www.lgma.ca

    Contact the Editor:Email: editor@lgma.ca

    Cover Illustration: Larry Limnidis/Getty Images

    222016-2017 LGMA Board and 2016 Award WinnersIntroducing your new LGMA Board and Chapter Directors, and celebrating the award winners at the Annual 2016 LGMA Conference.

    6Sustainable Waste: Not an OxymoronLearn how different areas of the province have developed their own best practices for sustainable waste management to suit their unique challenges and needs.

    15Waste Not. Want Not. Generating New Products from WasteLocal governments across B.C. are taking advantage of new technologies that turn waste into a resource to generate revenue and support their local waste-diversion goals.

    20Experiencing New ZealandLinda Berg of the Haisla Nation the fi rst First Nation government representative selected for the Overseas Exchange program reports on her experience in New Plymouth, New Zealand.

  • Promoting Professional Management &

    Leadership Excellence in Local Government 2

    IN THIS ISSUE

    I did not fully appreciate how important garbage and recycling services were until I started working in local government. It came as a bit of a shock when I did a survey of residents to fi nd out what information they most wanted to receive from the City. You

    guessed it garbage schedule updates. Since then, Ive paid a lot more attention to garbage and the increased expectation for recycling. Back in the old days so lets say 15 years ago our family tossed everything into the garbage. I wasnt aware of recycling programs and wouldnt know what to do with them even if I knew they existed. Our small family fi lled two garbage cans up every week and didnt blink. When I fi rst heard the term zero waste I considered it a nice ideal but unlikely in terms of any practical application.

    Jump ahead to today. We recycle everything we can, including dropping off items like electronics and paint cans at depots. We separate our food scraps. We make sure that paper, containers and glass are kept out of the garbage. We sort our refundable bottles and cans. We use one small garbage cart that is collected biweekly. We experience guilt if a recyclable item inadvertently makes its way into the garbage. We are converts to the aspiration for zero waste.

    This evolution to conscientious recycling isnt complete. I know there are holdouts. I suspect there is less personal pressure when youre an anonymous resident in a multi-family complex with centralized collection. But I believe the pressure and the acceptance of the responsibility to recycle will continue to spread. The trick for local governments is going to be keeping up with demand.

    In Sustainable Waste: Not an Oxymoron, it was interesting to see how different areas of the province have developed their own best practices to suit the needs and challenges of their communities. Its nice to know that one solution doesnt need to fi t everyone, and that a mix of approaches can still support the same outcomes in the long term.

    Even more exciting to me is the growth in new industries to turn waste into a resource that can be used and/or sold by local governments. Instead of looking at this waste as, well, a waste, these organizations are tapping into ways to sell their waste as new products. The communities featured in Waste Not. Want Not. Generating New Products fr om Waste, are creating new revenue sources for their local governments to help offset their operating costs while also supporting waste-diversion goals and extending the life of their landfi lls. Whether its high tech or low tech, the outcomes and benefi ts for taxpayers and the environment are impressive. Plus, the idea of turning garbage into a product that adds value is something everyone can celebrate.

    Waste management will continue to be a critical service, and residents will likely continue to list it as one of their top priorities. Its nice to see the progress in how these services are being delivered, the progress towards waste diversion goals, and the potential for creating something new and valuable from garbage and recycling someone else has tossed out. Kudos go to the local governments embarking on these projects and the organizations that support them.

    Th erese Mickelson, ABCEditor

    Upcoming themes for Exchange:

    Fall 2016Information Technology: Security and Privacy

    Winter 2017Affordable Housing: Challenges and Opportunities

  • Promoting Professional Management &

    Leadership Excellence in Local Government 3

    A s LGMA moves towards its 100th year in 2019, I am reminded of our roots, and in particular the foundational spirit of collaborative volunteerism that has guided us so well for many, many years. The longevity of that original

    spirit continues today in the strength and success of our profession.

    This past year we relied upon the collective efforts of more than 200 volunteers dedicating countless hours to deliver programs, provide professional development, mentor, coach and counsel. Your LGMA Board, Committees and Chapters continue to grow in strength, together and working with our Executive Director Nancy and her team. We all look forward to a very positive year.

    How are we so resilient and successful in the face of such a changing environment? Adam Grants Give and Take Why Helping Others Drives Success provides an interesting take on successful organizations and how those positive approaches lead to lasting success:

    According to conventional wisdom, highly successful people have three things in common: motivation, ability, and opportunity. If we want to succeed, we need a combination of hard work, talent, and luck. [But there is] a fourth ingredient, one thats critical but often neglected: success depends heavily on how we approach our interactions with other people. Every time we interact with another person at work, we have a choice to make: do we try to claim as much value as we can, or contribute value without worrying about what we receive in return?

    Grant suggests that positive contributors, or givers who contribute value without worrying about what they receive in return, succeed in a way that creates a ripple effect, enhancing the success of people around them. He notes Youll see that the difference lies in how giver success creates value, instead of just claiming it.

    I am very proud to say that this is highly evident in our British Columbia local government management profession and our very own LGMA.

    If youre a giver at work, you simply strive to be generous in sharing your time, energy, knowledge, skills, ideas and connections with other people who can benefi t from them. This really is what that spirit of collaborative volunteerism is all about. Theres something distinctive that happens when givers succeed: it spreads and cascades. Leaders who aspire to create meaningful and sustainable changes to their environments can harness this approach to achieve collective positivity in the face of signifi cant change pressures.

    These positive approaches at work also translate into happiness at home. People who feel they have contributed to others well-being at work usually feel pretty good at the end of the day too, especially if they had refl ected about their contribution in the hours after work. Bringing your work home with you can be benefi cial after all if youre thinking about it the right way.

    No gesture is too small when done with gratitude, wrote Oprah Winfrey. So as we move into a new year and you chart your own course to fi nd creative means to manage change in your own organization, try this simple approach: Pay it forward by taking the fi ve-minute favour challenge (read about it online!) and encourage your colleagues to do the same