Steve Jobs Presentation Secrets

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World‘s Most Successful Commercials Speeches Steve Jobs' 15 Presentation Key Factors.

Transcript of Steve Jobs Presentation Secrets

Steve Jobs' Presentation Secrets

Steve Jobs' Presentation Secrets

By Carmine Gallo

1

Fifteen Strategies You Can Employ Now

In his new book, The Presentation Secrets of Steve Jobs: How to be Insanely Great in Front of Any Audience, communications coach and BusinessWeek columnist Carmine Gallo reveals the techniques that have turned the Apples CEO into one of the worlds most extraordinary communicators. For more than three decades, Jobs has transformed product launches into an art form. In this slide show, learn what Jobs does to captivate his audience and how you can use his techniques to pitch your own company, service, product, or ideas.

2

Plan in Analog

A Steve Jobs presentation has all the elements of a great movieheroes and villains, stunning visuals, and a supporting cast. And, like a movie director, Steve Jobs "storyboards" the plot. Before you go digital and open PowerPoint, spend time brainstorming, sketching, or whiteboarding. Remember, youre delivering a story. Slides complement the story.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

3

Focus on Benefits

Your listeners are asking themselves one question: why should I care? Steve Jobs sells the benefit behind every new product or featureand hes very clear about it. Why buy an iPhone 3G? Because "its twice as fast at half the price." Whats so great about Time Capsule? "All your irreplaceable photos, videos, and documents are automatically protected and easy to retrieve if theyre ever lost." The Apple Web site also keeps the focus on the benefit, with features like "10 Reasons Why You'll Love a Mac." Nobody cares about your product or service. They only care about how your product or service will improve their lives.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

4

Sell Dreams, Not Products

Steve Jobs doesnt sell computers. He sells the promise of a better world. True evangelists are driven by a messianic zeal to create new experiences. When Jobs introduced the iPod in 2001, he said, "In our own small way, were going to make the world a better place." Where most people see the iPod as a music player, Jobs presents it as tool to enrich peoples lives. Of course, its important to have great products. But passion, enthusiasm, and a sense of purpose beyond the actual product will set you and your company apart.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

5

Create Twitter-Friendly Headlines

Can you describe your product or service in 140 characters? Steve Jobs offers a headline, or description, for every product and each headline can easily fit in a Twitter post. For example, when Jobs introduced the MacBook Air in January 2008, he described it simply: "The worlds thinnest notebook." That one sentence speaks volumes. Jobs will fill in the details during his presentation and on the Apple Web site, but he finds one sentence to position every product.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

6

Introduce the Antagonist

In classic stories, the hero fights the villain. The same holds true for a Steve Jobs presentation. In 1984, the villain was IBM (), known as"Big Blue". Before Jobs introduced the famous 1984 television ad to a group of Apple salespeople, he created a dramatic story around it. "IBM wants it all," he said. Apple would be the only company to stand in its way. It was very dramatic and the crowd went crazy. Branding expert Martin Lindstrom, says that great brands and religions have something in common: the idea of vanquishing a shared enemy. Creating a villain allows the audience to rally around the heroyour product.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

7

Draw a Road Map

Jobs outlines the storythe narrativeat the beginning of every presentation. At the Sept. 9, 2009, music event, Jobs told the audience he would be talking about three products: iPhones, iTunes, and iPods. Along the way he provides verbal guideposts such as "iPhones. The first thing I wanted to talk about today. Now, lets move on to the second, iTunes." Help your listeners follow the storyline.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

8

Create Visual Slides

Apple products are easy to use because they eliminate clutter. It's a design philosophy that applies to every Steve Jobs presentation. There are no bullet points in his presentations. Instead Jobs relies on photographs and images. Where the average PowerPoint slide has 40 words, it's difficult to find seven words on 10 of Jobs' slides. The technique is based on the idea that information is more effectively recalled when text and images are combined. For example, when Steve Jobs unveiled the Macbook Air, Apple's ultra-thin notebook computer, he showed a slide of the computer fitting inside a manila envelope. That image was worth a thousand words. "Simplicity is the ultimate sophistication," Jobs once said. Be sophisticated. Keep it simple.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

9

Obey the 10-Minute Rule

Neuroscientists have found that the brain gets tired after 10 minutes of any presentation. In other words, no matter how engaging the speaker, audiences will tend to tune out after approximately 10 minutes. A Steve Jobs presentation lasts about 1.5 hours but every 10 to 15 minutes, he breaks up the content with video, demonstrations or guest speakers. He doesn't give his audience time to get bored.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

10

Make Numbers Meaningful

In every Apple presentation, big numbers are put into context. On Sept. 9, 2009, Apple Vice-President Phil Schiller said that 220 million iPods had been sold to date. He placed that number into context by saying it represented 73% of the market. He broke it down even furtherand took a jab at the competitionby saying Microsoft (MSFT) was "pulling up the rear" with its 1% market share. Schiller learned his technique from Jobs who always puts large numbers into a context that's relevant to his audience.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

11

Use Zippy Words

Steve Jobs described the speed of the new iPhone 3G as "amazingly zippy." Where most business presenters use words that are too technical, vague, or confusing, Jobs' language is remarkably simple. He rarely, if ever, will use jargon that cloud most presentations like "best of breed" or "synergy." His language is simple, clear, and direct. Legendary GE ( GE ) CEO Jack Welch once said, "insecure managers create complexity." Exude confidence: speak simply.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers MeaningfulUse Zippy Words Share the StageUse PropsPlan a Water Cooler MomentPractice. A Lot.Dress Appropriately

12

Share the Stage

Steve Jobs is closely aligned with Apple but his presentations are rarely one-man plays. Jobs shares the stage with business partners, musicians, and employees. In October 2008, Jobs invited Apple's chief design guru, Jonathan Ive, to give the audience a tutorial on how Apple created a computer frame from a single piece of aluminum. Jobs could deliver the information himself, but he offers the stage to others who have a unique role or perspective.

Plan in AnalogFocus on BenefitsSell Dreams, Not ProductsCreate Twitter-Friendly HeadlinesIntroduce the AntagonistDraw a Road MapCreate Visual SlidesObey the 10-Minute RuleMake Numbers