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Page 1: saerb.diplomaplus.net · Web viewPlus English: English 111. Bloomington Graduation School. ... The Brief McGraw-Hill Handbook, 2nd edition. me tis, Volume VII, Ivy Tech’s literary

Plus English: English 111Bloomington Graduation School

Dual Credit Option* – PART IISarah Erb, Teacher

2016-2017*This course provides an opportunity for BGS students to earn dual credit – both high school and Ivy Tech credits. Successful completion of all requirements must be illustrated before dual credit will be awarded. This includes successful completion of Part l and ll, the Accuplacer Test, fulfilling required participation expectations for on-and off-campus discussion and opportunities, and successful completion of all required assignments.Sarah Erb, Teacher Website: saerb.diplomaplus.netBloomington Graduation School Room 175E-Mail: [email protected] Phone: 812-330-7708 x 53133

COURSE DESCRIPTION Plus English: English 111 is designed to develop students’ abilities to think, organize, and express their ideas clearly and effectively. This course incorporates reading, research, and critical thinking. Emphasis is placed on the various forms of expository writing such as process, description, narration, comparison, analysis, persuasion, and argumentation. Numerous in-class writing activities are required in addition to extended essays written outside of class. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be expected to:

1. Understand communication theory and the roles audiences play in the writing

process.2. Apply critical reading and thinking skills to the writing process.3. Demonstrate an awareness of language as a tool for learning and communication.4. Develop strategies for making independent, critical evaluations of

student and published texts.5. Research and critically evaluate information to produce writing with appropriate documentation.6. Apply strategies for the composition process such as drafting,

collaboration, revision, and peer evaluation to produce written documents.7. Write well-organized essays with a firm thesis and a clear

introduction, body, and conclusion.8. Engage in pre-writing activities, including narrowing a topic,

generating ideas,

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PLUS ENGLISH/ENG 111 – PART II: 2

determining the audience and the relationship between audience and

content, and setting and appropriate tone.9. Demonstrate an understanding of various rhetorical modes,

including argumentation and analysis, and apply that understanding in various writing environments, including an essay test.

10. Support a thesis statement with valid reasons and evidence.11. Follow the conventions of standard written English, in sentence

structure, punctuation, grammar and usage, and spelling.12. Recognize and develop styles appropriate to varied writing

situations.COURSE CONTENTTopical areas of studies will include:

Reading and thinking critically;Generating ideas;Identifying an audience;Developing a thesis;Organizing the essay;Prewriting, drafting, editing and revising;Following conventions of standard written English;Using rhetorical modes including argumentation and analysis;Conducting library and other research methods;Writing Essay Exams;Gathering, evaluating, and using sources for research;Paraphrasing, summarizing, and quoting;Documenting sources; andAvoiding plagiarism.

REQUIRED TEXTS & SUPPLIES Stephen Wilhoit. A Brief Guide to Writing from Readings, 5th

edition Lizbeth Bryant and Heather Clark. Essays on Writing Elaine P. Maimon, Janice H. Peritz, and Kathleen Blake Yancey.

The Brief McGraw-Hill Handbook, 2nd edition me tis, Volume VII, Ivy Tech’s literary magazine Student locker access & back-up electronic storage device (or

e-mail) Binder to hold/organize class handouts, reference materials,

and completed work

COURSE POLICIES ATTEND REGULARLY. To succeed in this class, you must

attend regularly. Your attendance and participation will figure into your final grade through the in-class exercises you will complete (quizzes, short writings, group projects, etc.) IF YOU ARE ABSENT, you MUST either inform me prior to the absence or provide adequate documentation why the absence was

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unavoidable when you return. If both conditions are met, some in-class exercises may be completed or alternate assignments will be provided.

COME PREPARED. Readings and work should be completed BEFORE class begins. It is pertinent that you are prepared for class in order to engage in class discussions and exercises. Have all materials needed for class.

KEEP UP IF YOU HAVE BEEN ABSENT. It is your responsibility to keep up with assignments if you miss class. Check our class webpage (saerb.diplomaplus.net) or our class Blackboard space for assignments. Also talk with fellow learning colleagues to find out what you have missed (work, what we discussed, questions discussed, assignments, etc.).

IF YOU HAVE QUESTIONS, SCHEDULE TIME TO MEET WITH ME. If you feel you have questions or need extra assistance, make sure you talk with me. We can schedule time to conference during work sessions in class or afterschool. Make sure to arrange afterschool meetings in advance.

PAPERS MUST BE WORD-PROCESSED, ILLUSTRATE THE WRITING PROCESS, & FOLLOW MLA GUIDELINES. All formal writing assignments (drafts & revised versions) must follow MLA guidelines for formatting. (All papers must include evidence of a brainstorming, drafting, peer critique, and revising & editing.)

DRAFTS & REVISIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR ALL MAJOR PAPERS. All major papers will go through a draft version (WORD PROCESSED) and a final, revised & edited version before a grade is assigned. If you fail to have a draft ready to submit at the beginning of class on the day it is due, you will automatically lose 10 points off of the final version of that particular paper. Those 10 points cannot be recovered. If you bring a draft that is handwritten, haphazard, or incomplete, you may lose up to 10 points. If you miss class on the day a draft is due, you can avoid losing the 10 points by submitting the draft BEFORE class. This is not a guarantee, however, that your draft will receive comments from a classmate.

SAVE YOUR WORK. It is your responsibility to keep back-up copies of all assignments that you turn in. You can store it in your locker, e-mail, or on an electronic storage device. (2 places are better than one.)

SUBMIT YOUR WORK ON TIME. Final versions of major papers are due before 3 p.m. on the day assigned in the syllabus. All other work is due at the start of class on the assigned day. *Work that is late may be turned in by the following Monday after the original due date, but will be reduced by 10 percent. **Absolutely no work will be accepted after the last class meeting of the semester. ***If you know you are going to be absent on the day an assignment is due, you may turn in the

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work EARLY to avoid losing credit. (This applies to all assignments EXCEPT in-class exercises.)

WORK MUST BE ORIGINAL TO THIS CLASS. In this class, we are going to be working with writing as a process of reading, thinking, drafting, and revising, with assignments building on each other over the course of the semester. To complete the course successfully, students must engage in this process. For this reason, students may not resubmit work they have completed in other classes. Papers that are determined to be old work resubmitted (autoplagiarism) rather than new work for this class will receive a zero.

DP LMS/BLACKBOARD. This class will make use of our DP learning management system and/or Blackboard (Ivy Tech’s learning management system). I will post grades and homework on DP and/or Blackboard. You MUST e-mail me IMMEDIATELY if you experience difficulties with Blackboard. I will get in touch with the Instructional and Online Technology department on your behalf.

STUDENT BEHAVIOR STATEMENTStudents should always conduct themselves in a respectful manner.

No conduct will be tolerated that might endanger or threaten anyone in the class.

Disruptive behavior, substance abuse, downgrading or disparaging remarks, and any other behavior that shows a lack of respect for the instructor or other students, will not be tolerated. This includes use of cell phones and laptops. We are in class for a reason: to improve your writing. Playing on laptops and cell phones not only wastes your time and mine, but it distracts others in the class. At the instructor’s discretion, a student causing problems may be asked to leave the class for the session. If a student persists in causing problems, further disciplinary action may be taken, up to and including dismissal from class.

ACADEMIC HONESTY STATEMENTThe College is committed to academic integrity in all its practices. The

faculty value intellectual integrity and a high standard of academic conduct.

Activities that violate academic integrity undermine the quality and diminish the

value of educational achievement.

Cheating on papers, tests, or other academic works is a violation of College

rules. No student shall engage in behavior that, in the judgment of the instructor of the class, may be construed as cheating. This may include, but is not limited to, plagiarism or other forms of academic

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dishonesty such as the acquisition without permission of tests or other academic materials and/or distribution of these materials and other academic work. This includes students who aid and abet as well as those who attempt such behavior.

COPYRIGHT STATEMENTStudents shall adhere to the laws governing the use of copyrighted

materials. Students must ensure that their activities comply with fair use and in no way infringe on the copyright or other proprietary rights of others and that the materials used and developed at Ivy Tech Community College of Indiana and Bloomington Graduation School contain nothing unlawful, unethical, or libelous, and do not constitute any violation of any right of privacy.

COURSE GRADING

For this course, grading is sequential and cumulative. Points increase as skills are added and complexity increases in the work. The final course grade is the result of dividing the total points earned by the total points possible. Points are earned from all work submitted.

Rubrics will be used to evaluate each final draft. Students will know the rubric criteria in advance of a paper’s due date. Grading criteria will encompass traits specific to each type of writing assignment in addition to writing style, language conventions, source documentation, and format.

In order to pass this course, students must submit all assigned work. (See “Course Schedule & Assignments” for points associated with work.)

A = 100-90 B = 89-80 C = 79-70 D = 69-60 F =59-0

A: An “A” paper is outstanding. It explores the subject in great depth and reveals attention to the nuances and complexities of the topic at hand. It is focused, carefully supported, nicely organized,

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meets the requirements of the assignment, and exhibits the writer’s mastery of mechanical skills and styles.

B: A “B” paper is better than average. It examines the subject in some depth. Thesis is supported and organization is generally clear. Paragraphs and sentences are generally well constructed. Mechanics are clean for the most part. The paper meets the requirements for the assignment.

C: A “C” paper offers an acceptable examination of the subject, but it lacks depth. Thesis is present but not well-supported with examples and illustrations. Skeletal over-all organization is present. Paper may depend on generalizations and lack detail. Paragraphs may not be fully developed. Sentences are clear but may be awkward at times. The paper meets the major requirements of the assignment.

D: A “D” paper demonstrates below average effort. It does not examine the subject in depth and lacks organization. Paragraphs are not well-developed. Awkward sentence structure may create problems for the reader. It may exhibit significant mechanical difficulties. It may not complete all the requirements of the assignment.

F: An “F” paper is unacceptable. It lacks a thesis and organization. Paragraphs are not developed. It lacks details and examples. It is difficult to follow. It exhibits significant mechanical difficulties. It does not complete all the requirements of the assignment.

COURSE FOCUS & WORK

The focus of this class is designed on the following premises: everything (books, movies, ads, even our own personal experience) is a text, that all texts require careful “reading” to be understood and appreciated, that writing about texts deepens our understanding of them, and that the majority of good academic writing is necessarily analytical (that is, it seeks to understand and unlock). Our focus will be on the documents of pop culture – songs, ads, films, TV shows, and other texts.

ASSIGNMENT SEQUENCE

You will be writing four formal papers for this class and fifteen shorter skill-building assignments. You will also be asked to write/complete in-class exercises on a regular basis and to complete a writing/reading journal (see “Writing/Reading Journal

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Expectations”). The four formal papers will go through and illustrate the writing process (brainstorming, drafting, peer review, revising & editing, and a final draft) before a final grade is given. The fifteen shorter assignments are not all required to go through or illustrate the writing process, but you would be wise to apply what you know about drafting and revising to your production of these shorter assignments. In other words, do not assume that the first words you put down on paper are the words you should turn in.

15 SHORT WRITTEN, SKILL-BUILDING ASSIGNMENTSYou will be asked to produce 15 short written assignments designed to help you master/practice skills essential to completing the major papers successfully.

PAPER 3: CRITIQUE (1500 – 1750 WORDS) (3 sources)

PAPER 4: ARGUMENTATIVE SYNTHESIS (1500 - 1750 WORDS) (6 sources)

POINT VALUE FOR ASSIGNMENTS

15 Short Assignments (10-25 points each) 250Paper 3: Critique 100Paper 4: Argumentative Synthesis

150In-class Exercises (5-20 points each) 200W/R Journal: Readings & Responses (5 @ 10 pts. each) 50Total Possible 800

DRAFTS:Each of the four major papers requires illustration of the writing process. If you fail to submit illustrations of brainstorming, or drafting by the beginning of class time on the day it is due, you will automatically lose 10 points on the final version of the a paper. These 10 points cannot be recovered, not even if you opt to “re-revise” the final draft after it is assigned a final grade.

LATE WORK:Work will be accepted by the following Monday after the original due date, but the final score will be reduced by 10 percent. This includes major papers. (This is in addition to any reduction for missing brainstorming/drafting.)

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REPLACEMENT POINTS:You have the potential to earn 40 replacement points by writing more than the required number of journal entries (4 per installment). Additional replacement points may be earned by participating in posted opportunities (see “Replacement Points”).

COURSE SCHEDULE & ASSIGNMENTS*The course schedule and procedures are subject to change in the event of extenuating circumstances as determined by the instructor. Additional In-Class Exercises may be required.*ABBREVIATIONS BGWR = A Brief Guide to Writing from Readings

BMHH = The Brief McGraw-Hill Handbook SA = Short Assignment

REVIEW: Introductions of Learning Colleagues & Course Expectations (Dual Credit/Enrollment)Review Expectations, Policies, & ProceduresDual Credit Requirements/Syllabus ReviewReview DP Competencies and DP LMS

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Writing SampleAccuplacer Practice & Review REVIEW Assignments: Introduction to Our Work Together – all required partsSyllabus ReviewCompleted & Signed Course Review SheetWriting/Reading Responses: Due by the END of WEEK 9Pre-Course Content Evaluation Writing Sample (DP Competencies; Rubric w/ Self-Evaluation & Reflection)Accuplacer Practice / Review work assigned & completed / Accuplacer Scheduling

Week 1: Values established & transmitted through Pop CultureAssignments for the Week: In-Class ExercisesSanes: “Is Pop Culture more moral (and less moral) than what it is given credit for?”SA9: Summary of Sanes (20 pts)

Week 2: CritiqueAcademic Voice Effective Use of Source Material Avoiding WordinessAssignments for the Week: In-Class ExercisesRead BGWR Chapter 6 (“Critique”)Draft Paper 3: CritiqueRevise Paper 3: Critique

Week 3: Research – Process & ToolsCredibilityPlagiarismLogical FallaciesFree & Hidden (Invisible) WebAssignments for the Week: In-Class Exercises Read BGWR Chapter 11 (“Plagiarism”) Logical FallaciesShort Assignment 10: Free & Hidden (Invisible) Web

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Week 4: Introduce Argumentative SynthesisAssignments for the Week: In-Class ExercisesRead BGWR Chapter 10 (“Argumentative Synthesis”)Mickey Mouse Monopoly (Viewing Notes)Collaborative Reading of Giroux

Week 5: Argumentative SynthesisFree & Invisible(Hidden) WebAssignments for the Week: In-Class Exercises SA10: Free & Invisible(Hidden) Web

Week 6:Critical Reading / Background ResearchCritical ViewingFree & Invisible(Hidden) Web ResearchAssignments for the Week: In-Class ExercisesSA11: Critical Reading / Background ReadingsCritical Viewing NotesDUE: W/R Journal Installment ll (5 RESPONSES & OPTIONAL 4 REPLACEMENT POINT RESPONSES)

Week 7: Argumentative SynthesisAnnotated BibliographyAssignments for the Week: In-Class Exercises SA12: Annotated Bibliography Power Point Continued Research & Discussion

Week 8:Annotated BibliographyPresent Power Point Assignments for the Week: In-Class ExercisesPresent Power Point - Develop shared bibliography

Week 9: ProposalResearchAnnotated Bibliography Assignments for the Week:

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In-Class ExercisesSA13: Proposal SA14: Annotated BibliographyWriting/Reading Responses (required, optional, and additional)

Week 10: Review Thesis (Claim), Sub-claims, and Evidence DraftingReview of PlagiarismAssignments for the Week: In-Class ExercisesSA15: Argumentative Synthesis IntroductionIndividual Conference (Introduction & Outline)Draft Paper 4: Argumentative Synthesis

Week 11: Peer ReviewRevising Review / Editing ReviewIndividual ConferencesAssignments for the Week: In-Class ExercisesPeer ReviewRevised Paper 4: Argumentative Synthesis

Week 12: Post-Course Content Evaluation & Self-ReflectionReview Conference PreparationArtifact Reflection for DP Working PortfolioAssignments for the Week: Post-Course Content EvaluationSelf-Reflection (POST)Review Conference w/ Competency Illustrations PreparedArtifact Reflection for DP Working Portfolio Complete Ivy Tech Feedback SurveyReturn Books (only then will credit be awarded)

W/R RESPONSES: READINGS & RESPONSES

To learn to write well, you must write often and read often. For this class, you will be required to read documents and write responses to those documents – as an incentive to write and read frequently. These responses will be a place for you to read, think about, and critique documents that we will not have time to discuss in class but which will foster your growth as a writer. (The first installment was completed in Part II.)

REQUIREMENTS Word-processed Include a text box with the prompt for the W/R Journal entry at the top

of the page

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Formatted according to MLA guidelines (include a title referencing the prompt)

Each installment of the must contain:o At least 5 entries of at least 150 words,o Word count at the end of each entry,o A minimum of 3 entries in response to prompts from Category A,o A minimum of 1 entry in response to prompts from Category B,

and o no prompt can be responded to more than once.

PROMPTS

Category A

1. In “Writing an Autobiography” (EW, 30), what purpose does bell hooks say that writing autobiography served for her? And to what purpose(s) do you typically put your own writing?

2. Read Vetter’s “Bonehead Writing” (EW, 35). Think of voice as simply the presence or personality behind the writing. Describe Vetter’s voice in this essay and compare his “voice” to your own when you write? What does his voice say about him? What does your “voice” say about you?

3. Aronowitz argues that “writing is not a skill” (EW, 39). What does he say that it is instead and do you agree?

4. Read Brandeis’s “Dyr Mom” (EW, 49). Compare Hannah’s use of writing as a child to your own use of writing when you were little. Did you write? To what purpose?

5. Read Wych’s “Time, Tools, and Talisman’s” (EW, 52). What advice does she have for writers? And which of her advice seems most helpful to you or most relevant to your own writing practices?

6. Read Lamott’s “Shitty First Drafts” (EW, 69). What does she say about the writing process? Is this what you would expect a professional, published author to say? Why? Why not?

7. What does Zinsser mean by the term “simplicity” (EW, 85)? Explain fully.

8. Read Christensen’s “Teaching Standard English” (EW, 101). Describe what she means by the term “voices of home” and discuss your own “voices of home.” Have they helped you fit in to an academic environment? Hindered you?

9. Read Leibowitz’s “Technology Transforms Writing” (EW, 137). In what ways – good and bad – does she say that technology affects writing? Choose one of these ways and explain how it pertains to your own writing.

10. In “Adventures in Cheating” (EW, 148), what project does Sevenson undertake and how does it turn out?

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11. In “Of Plagiarism, Paper Mills, and the Harried, Hurried Student” (EW, 156), what is Hourigan trying to achieve? Who is her intended audience? How can you tell? Where does she appeal to what she assumes are her audience’s interests, attitudes, and beliefs?

12. What are the main points in “What Corporate America Can’t Build” (EW, 176)? Then find an example of a real-world ineffective email, copy it into your journal, and explain why it’s ineffective.

Category B

13. Find a text in me tis, Volume VII, that you feel is of low quality. Explain what makes it unsuccessful. Include the title and author of the text, as well as a copy of the text with your response.

14. Find a text in me tis, Volume VII, that you feel is of high quality. Explain what makes it successful. Include the title and author of the text, as well as a copy of the text with your response.

15. Skim the pieces in me tis, Volume VII. From them, what can you derive about

the Ivy Tech community and/or student body?16. Write a poem or very short story (called flash fiction) that you

would consider submitting to me tis, Volume VII, or another publication.

Category C

17. Find a song about education. Clearly identify the title and performer on a copy of lyrics you will include with your response. Analyze the song, explaining its central points about education. Do you agree or disagree with its central points?

18. Find a song about what it means to be an American. Clearly identify the title and performer on a copy of lyrics you will include with your response. Analyze the song, explaining its central points. Do you agree or disagree with its central points?

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19. Describe your favorite commercial. Offer an intelligent rationale for why it is your favorite. Remember to identify the product and commercial. (If you can find it on YouTube, include a web address.)

20. Identify your favorite movie and explain why it’s your favorite. Remember to include the title of the movie, the director(s), production company, and release date.

21. Identify a book to which you had a strong reaction – positive or negative – and explain why you had the reaction you did. Remember to include the title of the book, the author, the publishing company, and publication date.

GRADING

Think about the traits of good writing when completing your W/R Journal entries. I may comment in response to the content, as well as the writing traits, of your entries. You have the potential to earn 0, 5, or 10 points on each of the required entries.

Points will be deducted (5 or 10) for each unsatisfactory or ineffective journal entry.

You could lose points on an entry if: you fail to submit an entry, your entry is too short, your entry does not address the prompt fully, your entry shows little thought or effort, your entry has numerous superficial errors, you fail to label your entry or clarify which prompt you’re responding

to, or you fail to provide the word count for an entry.

REPLACEMENT POINTS

If you make more than the required number of entries in your W/R Journal, you can earn replacement points. Up to 40 replacement points are available. Each extra entry that you make (above the required 10) is worth 5 replacement points (if the entry meets the basic requirements for a journal entry).

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Replacement points are also all or nothing – either you earn the full 5 points on an entry or none at all. You may write 8 additional entries from the provided prompts OR from self-created prompts that connect with pop culture (clear the prompts). You may turn in 4 additional entries per installment. Each replacement response must be titled as a replacement response.

SAMPLE W/R JOURNAL ENTRY

See the following page for a correctly formatted journal entry.

W/R JOURNAL ENTRY 1Response to Prompt B14: Find a text in [sic] that you feel is of high quality. Explain what makes it successful. Include the title and author of the text, as well as a copy of the text with your response.

Sarah Erb

Teacher Erb

English 111

August 1, 2013

“Pickles”: A Successful Text in [sic]

One of the characteristics of high-quality writing is that it’s detailed.

Stephanie Kennedy’s short poem “Pickles” on page 12 of [sic] fits this

requirement and is therefore an excellent poem. “Pickles” is not an abstract

poem about ideas; instead, it digs right into detail, telling a very specific

story. It is about a young girl who is naïve enough to let her older sister

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convince her that their dog can talk. Readers are told that the sister hides

“around corners” and makes the dog talk in a “deep, British [voice].” Not

only are readers told about the way voices sound, they are supplied with

precise words – in the form of dialogue. The protagonist of the poem asks,

“Pickles, why?” And Pickles responds, “I was born in Europe.” The poem’s

use of detail is so strong that it creates meaning. The final lines indicate that

Pickles’s voice “was much, / much, much / deeper / than I’d expected.” She

should be surprised by a dog talking; instead, she’s surprised by the way it

talks. This detail reveals how charmingly innocent she is (or was). And she

conveys this idea without ever having to say “I was naïve.” The details do

the work for her. [word count 204]

REVISION POLICY

OPTIONAL REVISION OF YOUR PAPERSYou may re-revise your major papers (Papers 1-4) for an improved grade. The improved grade will replace the original grade recorded.

DEADLINERe-revisions may be turned in by one week after the work was returned to you. No re-revisions will be accepted during the last week of class.

FORMATTurn your re-revision with the original GRADED version of the paper (and all revisions and drafts). Re-revisions turned in without the first graded version will not be accepted. Email submissions will not be graded.

STRATEGIES Before revising, carefully consider the comments made by both your

instructor and your peers. Brainstorm ways to address concerns. If somebody else had written this paper and was showing it to you – what would you recommend?

Revision IS NOT Editing. Revision involves more than simply correcting spelling or grammatical errors notes on your papers. Revision involves responding to readers’ needs, answering questions, rethinking

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organization, adding needed material, and deleting unnecessary materials.

You may always request a conference before submitting your re-revisions. If you do schedule a conference, be prepared with specific questions about your drafts. Bring all previous drafts, earlier comments, and peer response sheets.

CAVEATS I will not tell you how to write any paper, nor will I correct all of your

errors. I will discuss the ideas and organization of your paper with you and give you further suggestions for approaching your revision. This may involve giving you organizational patterns or wording to consider. The final version of any revision is your responsibility.

I will identify grammatical or format issues you need to address, and help you understand those issues so you can correct your own mistakes. I will not proofread your papers. (Although I will help you work with and practice conventions you struggle with.)

Revising a paper requires effort and diligence. If you revise your paper in a superficial way, do not expect to receive an improved grade.

EDITING MARKSListed below are some of the abbreviations I may use in the margins of your papers to indicate areas you need to work on to improve your sentence and paragraph level writing. (You’ll notice a few abbreviations that have to do with revising. I just can’t help myself – I love abbreviations. If you can’t decipher any, see me for clarification.)

Spelling

Usage (wrong word or form of word)

Excessive Wording (need to be concise)

Awkward Expression or Wording

Agreement Problem (subject/verb or pronoun/antecedent)

Invert Order

Apostrophe Issue (plural or possessive)

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Comma Splice

Fragmented Sentence

Run-on Sentence

Clarification Needed

Examples Needed

Ambiguous Reference

Insert

Delete

New Paragraph

Indent

Incorrect Formatting

Incorrect Use of MLA Documentation