Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

of 36 /36
Richard Strauss (1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS ALEXEI UTKIN / HERMITAGE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

Page 1: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

Richard Strauss (1864–1949)

DELICATE STRAUSSALEXEI UTKIN / HERMITAGE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

Page 2: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

HE

RM

ITA

GE

SO

LO

IST

S

MICHAEL SHILENKOV, FYODOR YAROVOI, PHILIPP NODEL, MALIKA MUKHITDINOVA, EUGENY PETROV, NIKOLAI ZENKIN

Page 3: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

Total Time

[49:30]

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

1 Meinem Kinde (Op. 37, Nr. 3). Transkription von MikhailUtkin für Oboe und Orchester (2005) To My Child (Op. 37, №3). Transcription for oboe and orchestra by Mikhail Utkin (2005) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [2:30]

2 Romanze (1879). Transkription für Oboe d’amore mit Orchesterbegleitung Romance (1879). Transcription for oboe d’amore and orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [8:09]

Konzert D-Dur für Oboe und kleines Orchester (1945)Concerto in D major for oboe and small orchestra (1945)

3 Allegro moderato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [8:10]4 Andante . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [8:40]5 Vivace . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [4:35]6 Allegro . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [2:30]

7 Einleitung zu der Oper „Capriccio“ (Op. 85) Prelude to the opera ‘Capriccio’ (Op. 85) . . . . . . . . . . . . [10:43]

8 Morgen! (Op. 27, Nr. 4). Transkription von Mikhail Utkin für Oboe und Orchester (2005) Tomorrow! (Op. 27, №4). Transcription for oboe and orchestra by Mikhail Utkin (2005) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . [3:33]

Page 4: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

ne day Romain Rolland shared a curious observation withRichard Strauss: ‘I am surprised and amused that you have somemusical phrases that are somewhat closely connected to your per-sonality. They are as inseparable from you as the expression onyour face, your forehead and your eyes. It seems that some phras-es convey your entire essence. I have never noticed it to this extentin other composers.’ It is interesting that Rolland connected the‘musical phrases’ of Strauss not with the thoughts or feelings ofthe author, but only with the appearance, facial expressions or fea-tures – of course, these are the individual and inalienable, but formusical associations they would seem the least suitable. It is, with-out doubt, a half-joking remark but nevertheless catches some-thing truthful and essential. If we look at the twists and turns ofStrauss’ journey we can be convinced that the analogy could hard-ly be otherwise. His creative life was extremely prolonged. Eightyof the eighty five years he was alive, he was composing music. Hewrote eight tone poems, fifteen operas, more than one hundred

4

ENGL

ISHO

Page 5: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

ENGL

ISH

5

and fifty songs and many other works. In addition to this, one ofthe most astonishing features of his music is its stylistic diversity.The change of style in the works, which were written one after theother, sometimes seems so sharp and unexpected as to causeinvoluntary bewilderment: Where is the real Strauss? What doeshe take seriously? Who is he in fact? Is it really this composer whocreated Elektra with the most frightening scene of madness inoperatic literature, the exceptionally well-balanced and successfulman, the ‘innate humorist’ as Romain Rolland remarked?

This innate humorist didn’t always make a pleasant impres-sion on his contemporaries. Gustav Mahler found Strauss to bean arrogant and practical man, who ‘looked at everything withsome kind of indifference’. ‘The atmosphere which one feelsaround Strauss – he wrote – is too dampening. I would rather eatthe bread of poor and walk in the light than be lost in the flat-lands.’ Stravinsky whose attitude towards Strauss was borderingon scepticism said: ‘Perhaps Strauss can charm and delight, buthe cannot move. That may be because he had no commitment;he didn't give a damn... But I have a terrible thought. What if Iam sentenced to Strauss in Purgatory?’ Possibly this ‘insensibili-ty’ to the surroundings, noticed by his contemporaries, is partlyexplained by the variegated style of his work and his character.The composer seemed to try on various carnival costumes: theheroic-romantic (the earlier opera Guntram, 1893; the tonepoem Ein Heldenleben, 1898), the ultramodern (the operasSalome, 1905; Elektra, 1908), the naively-enchanting and ele-gant (Der Rosenkavalier, 1910), the ascetic, strict, ‘ancient’ (theopera Ariadne, 1916) and others. Having tried one costumeDE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

Page 6: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

6

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS Strauss left it and put on another one. He gave the impression

of a man who was playing with creativity but not living thesefeelings which he made up himself (possibly his music wasn’tmerged with his essence, like the expression on his face, hisforehead, and his eyes). However, in his work was somethingthat belonged only to him, something that was exceptionallyconceived by his artistic gift.

‘Strauss is a real volcano. His music burns, smokes, cracks,gives off a bad smell and sweeps away everything in its path’wrote the very same Romain Rolland and it is difficult to expressmore precisely. The works represented in this album were writ-ten by ‘three different Strausses’. Strauss the child, who is onlyjust discovering for himself the musical world (Romance for clar-inet and orchestra), Strauss the loving and faithful husband(songs Morgen! and Meinem Kinde) and Strauss the wise man,philosophically looking at the path he had left behind (Prelude tothe opera Capriccio and the Oboe Concerto).

***The list of early works of Strauss is surprisingly mature (after-

wards the composer even regretted such an uneconomicalexpenditure of strength). Almost all of this was instrumentalmusic, which Strauss composed under the watchful eyes of hisfather (the best French horn player of the Munich orchestra) andFriedrich Wilhelm Meyer (the director of the same orchestra).The experienced instructors were conservatives, and adherentsof traditional Austro-German art, and the young Richard wasbrought up on Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven, Schubert, Weber andMendelssohn. Apart from studying masterpieces Strauss had the

ENGL

ISH

ENGL

ISH

Page 7: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

7

possibility to try out, for himself, various instruments. He playedon them in an amateur orchestra which was led by his father.This came to light, for example, in Romance for violin, Concertofor French horn, Romance for cello and orchestra and Romancefor clarinet and orchestra. Having heard this last piece, howcouldn’t you smile: surely a future titan could treat an orchestrathoroughly, tenderly and in the ‘correct manner’! How could youpossibly not recall the edifying words of his father: ‘Dear Richard,please, when you compose something new try so that your workwould be melodious and not too difficult, and that it would soundgood on the piano.’ Well, subsequently father didn’t approve ofhis son’s music, but at this time, whilst the fifteen-year-old boywas writing Romance for clarinet, the father could still be proudof him. In this piece all was ‘normal’: the form and harmony; thegentle melodious first theme, the second, just as tender, thatdarkens towards the end and the gloomy third, rigorouslybrought out by the strings.

Later, having been freed from an orthodox upbringing, andhaving discovered the music of Liszt and Wagner, Strauss left hisfavourite instrumental genres. His attention was attracted first ofall to the tone poem, and then the opera. Only at the end of hislife he returned to the pure instrumental music.

***The composer who wrote the songs Morgen! and Meinem

Kinde is already a different Strauss. This is an exemplary thirty-year-old family man and totally in love with his wife, Pauline Mariade Ahna. There was a paradox which couldn’t silence the parents,acquaintances, nor biographers of Strauss: the woman with theDE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

ENGL

ISH

Page 8: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

8

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS nastiest character, capricious, vulgar and tactless (but nonetheless

very pretty), who provoked all who knew her personally into deephostility, was the happiness of his entire life. They lived togetherfor fifty five years in love and accordance. Pauline was a singerand her career started successfully in the best German theatres.Having got married the happy spouses performed a lot together.She sang his compositions; he accompanied her on the piano.

Every sound of the songs represented in this album breathes loveand tenderness (both of the songs were dedicated ‘to my belovedPauline’, to the dearest wife and the best performer of them).Morgen!, a poem by John Henry Mackay, was written for the dayof his marriage (10th of September, 1894); and the lullabyMeinem Kinde (by Gustav Falke) was created for the birthday ofhis one and only son, Franz (12th of April, 1898). These songsStrauss arranged himself for voice and chamber ensemble, but inthis album they are performed in the transcription of Mikhail Utkin.

The poem of Henry Mackay is about two lovers who are givenby the sun’s rays the chance of being together again: on a faraway coast ‘rapture’s great hush will flow’ over them. In the mindof Strauss the first verse of the poem already promises a blessedstate – a state that arose as if from a long time ago, and now onlylasts and renews: ‘Tomorrow again will shine the sun / And onmy sunlit path of earth / Unite us again, as it has done, / Andgive our bliss another birth.’ A long instrumental passage pre-cedes the appearance of the vocal melody, and the voice hasonly to catch the finishing theme and join in with its own‘again…, again…’, and once more the same theme starts fromthe violin, and again an idyllic mood lasts.

ENGL

ISH

Page 9: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

ENGL

ISH

9

The song Meinem Kinde is a lullaby which a mother sings toher small child. A glance upwards – and ‘a flight soaring up toheaven’ begins. Love plucks an herb of happiness, which isgrown from little star’s ‘mere radiance and light’, and hurriesback to bring this gift to the baby. Strauss follows a complicatedspatial trajectory along the harmonious ‘way’. His song is inthree sections. The uttermost sections (by the child’s cradle) don’tleave the main F major key (in the transcription G flat major),they are both ‘at home’ and ‘below’. On the contrary, in the mid-dle episode there is the heavenly flight and the search for tonic.‘Love’ appears among the pizzicato chords, which lead to thereprise, to the baby’s cradle.

***All biographers write about the last ten years of Strauss’ life with

great pleasure. The composer was surprisingly bright, fresh, full ofartistic ideas, and created music that was absolutely new for hisstyle – crystal clear and pure. By this time he had achieved every-thing he could have dreamed of. All summits had been climbed,and there only remained for Strauss to look inside himself.

The opera Capriccio was written in Hitler’s Germany in1940–1941, the Concerto for Oboe – immediately after thewar. In these works there was no echo of what was happeningin the world. ‘I can’t stand the tragic atmosphere of nowadays –remarked the composer – I have the right to write the musicwhich I like, don’t I?’

Strauss’ Capriccio is an intellectual ‘caprice’ about the prob-lems of the genre which it represents and discusses at the sametime – the opera. Its main idea is an aesthetic discussion aboutDE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

Page 10: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

10

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS what is more important: music or words? Strauss was captivated

by the idea of creating a witty representation of this theme – ‘firstwords then music (Wagner), or first music then words (Verdi), oronly words without music (Goethe), or only music without words(Mozart).’ In Capriccio the Composer fights for music in firstplace, and for the supremacy of poetry – the Poet. Both are inlove with the charming countess Madeleine, in whom lies theresponsibility for deciding the argument: the main thing is whothe countess prefers. But Madeleine hesitates; she likes both, andespecially likes sonnets being addressed to her, music belongingto the Composer and words to the Poet. In the last scene theyoung lady asks for advice from her own reflection in the mirror,but in vain. Alas, she doesn’t have the strength to take the deci-sion: ‘Futile are the attempts to separate them both. One art res-cues the other and in this the secret lies.’ This change of affairsreflects the innermost thoughts of the very same Strauss: ‘Thefight between words and sounds – he wrote – was for me themost important problem from the very beginning of my careerand concluded in Capriccio with the question mark.’

This ‘fight’ is already felt in the Prelude to the opera, written forstring orchestra. It leads the listener into the intellectual andrefined world of opera-meditation. At the beginning the enigmat-ic motives just supplement the ornament with different shades ofmeaning. But suddenly one imperceptible figure multiplies withcatastrophic speed (it is performed, in turns, by all the instru-ments) and decisively and powerfully declares its own excellence.Nevertheless, the piece ends with reconciliation and return of theinitial harmony. As Strauss remarked ‘in music you can say what-

ENGL

ISH

ENGL

ISH

Page 11: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

11

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS ever you want, no one will understand you.’ However, what he

‘tells’ us at the beginning of Capriccio seems rather clear…The Oboe Concerto was inspired by an American soldier, John

de Lancie, who in peace time was an oboe player in thePittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. You can’t confuse the mood ofthis music with anything, even if you don’t know that its authorwas an old man, already having celebrated his eightieth year. Thisis the mood of man, who brightly bids farewell to the world, hav-ing fun one last time with all his heart. In spite of the fact that theoboe part demands a certain virtuosity, the music of the concertois somewhat childish and playful. All four movements are in major.Strauss the magician invents the themes and lets them wanderthrough the various movements of the work. Here and there thefamiliar physiognomy is glimpsed fleetingly. But one characterportrayed in the second theme of the opening movement getsthrough the whole concerto and achieves the finale. It is a veryshort motif which softly and persistently knocks four times at arepeating sound. In the beginning it remains strict but in the finaleit whirls in an enchanting waltz, and even in the concluding chordsone can distinguish its rhythmic shape. In it is something of thetheme of ‘fate’, which reminds one of the remaining time.

Music written by Strauss in his last years was about his ownfeelings, about that which touched him deeply. It can hardly becompared to the expression of his face – it is integral to the com-poser, like his very own soul.

Varvara Timchenko, translated by Dave Nicholls

ENGL

ISH

Page 12: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

12

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

‰ Ì‡Ê ‰˚ êÓ ÏÂÌ êÓÎ Î‡Ì ÔÓ ‰Â ÎËÎ Òfl Ò êË ı‡ ‰ÓÏ òÚ‡ -Û ÒÓÏ Î˛ ·Ó Ô˚Ú Ì˚Ï Ì‡ ·Î˛ ‰Â ÌË ÂÏ: «å Ìfl ۉ˂ Îfl ÂÚ Ë Á‡ ·‡‚ Îfl -ÂÚ, ˜ÚÓ Û Ç‡Ò Ì ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚ ÏÛ Á˚ ͇θ Ì˚ ه Á˚ Í‡Í ·˚ ÚÂÒ ÌÓÒ‚fl Á‡ Ì˚ Ò Ç‡ ̄ ÂÈ Î˘ ÌÓ Ò Ú¸˛; ÓÌË Ú‡Í Ê Ì ‡Á ‰Âθ Ì˚ Ò Ç‡ -ÏË, Í‡Í Ë ‚˚ ‡ Ê ÌË LJ ̄  „Ó ÎË ̂ ‡, LJ¯ ÎÓ·, LJ ̄ Ë „· Á‡: ͇ -ÊÂÚ Òfl, ˜ÚÓ Ì ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚ ه Á˚ ÚÓ˜ ÌÓ Ô  ‰‡ ̨ Ú ‚Ò LJ ̄  ÒÛ -˘Â ÒÚ ‚Ó. Ç Ú‡ ÍÓÈ ÒÚ Ô ÌË fl ̋ ÚÓ „Ó ÌË ÍÓ„ ‰‡ Ì Á‡ Ï ̃ ‡Î Û ‰Û „ËıÍÓÏ ÔÓ ÁË ÚÓ Ó‚». ᇠ·‡‚ ÌÓ, ˜ÚÓ êÓ ÏÂÌ êÓÎ Î‡Ì Ò‚fl Á˚ ‚‡ ÂÚ «ÏÛ -Á˚ ͇θ Ì˚ ه Á˚» òÚ‡ Û Ò‡ ÌÂ Ò ̃ Û‚ ÒÚ ‚‡ ÏË Ë Ï˚Ò Îfl ÏË Ëı ‡‚ -ÚÓ ‡, ‡ ÚÓθ ÍÓ Ò ‚̯ ÌÓ Ò Ú¸˛, Ò ‚˚ ‡ Ê ÌË ÂÏ ËÎË ̃  ڇ ÏË ÎË -ˆ‡, ‰Îfl ÏÛ Á˚ ͇θ Ì˚ı ‡Ò ÒÓ ̂ Ë ‡ ̂ ËÈ, ͇ Á‡ ÎÓÒ¸ ·˚, ̇ Ë Ï ÌÂÂÔÓ‰ ıÓ ‰fl ̆ Ë ÏË. ùÚÓ, ·Â ÁÛÒ ÎÓ‚ ÌÓ, ÔÓ ÎÛ ̄ ÛÚ ÎË ‚Ó Á‡ Ï ̃ ‡ ÌËÂ,ÌÓ ‚Ò Ê ‚ ÌÂÏ Òı‚‡ ̃  ÌÓ Ì ̃ ÚÓ Ô‡‚ ‰Ë ‚ÓÂ Ë ÒÛ ̆  ÒÚ ‚ÂÌ ÌÓÂ.ÇÓ ‚Òfl ÍÓÏ ÒÎÛ ̃ ‡Â, ÂÒ ÎË ÔË ÒÏÓ Ú ÂÚ¸ Òfl Í ÒÓ ̃ Ë Ì ÌË flÏ òÚ‡ Û -Ò‡, ÒÏ˚ÒÎ ˝ÚËı ‡Ì‡ ÎÓ „ËÈ ÒÚ‡ ÌÓ ‚ËÚ Òfl flÒ Ì˚Ï. í‚Ó ̃ Â Ò Í‡flÊËÁ̸ ÍÓÏ ÔÓ ÁË ÚÓ ‡ ·˚ · ‚ÂÒ¸ χ ÔÓ ‰ÓÎ ÊË ÚÂθ ÌÓÈ – ‚Ó -ÒÂϸ ‰Â ÒflÚ ËÁ ‚ÓÒ¸ ÏË ‰Â Òfl ÚË Ôfl ÚË ÔÓ ÊË Ú˚ı ÎÂÚ ÓÌ ÒÓ ̃ Ë ÌflÎ

O

РУСС

КИЙ

Page 13: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

13

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

РУСС

КИЙ

ÏÛ Á˚ ÍÛ. éÌ Ì‡ ÔË Ò‡Î ‚Ó ÒÂϸ ÒËÏ ÙÓ ÌË ̃ Â Ò ÍËı ÔÓ ̋ Ï, ÔflÚ Ì‡‰ -ˆ‡Ú¸ ÓÔÂ, ·Ó ΠÒÚ‡ Ôfl ÚË ‰Â Òfl ÚË Ô ÒÂÌ Ë ÏÌÓ „Ó ‰Û „ÓÂ. èË˝ÚÓÏ Ó‰ ̇ ËÁ Ò‡ Ï˚ı Û‰Ë ‚Ë ÚÂθ Ì˚ı ̃ ÂÚ Â„Ó Ú‚Ó ̃  ÒÚ ‚‡ – ÒÚË -ÎË Ò ÚË ̃ Â Ò ÍÓ ÏÌÓ „Ó Ó· ‡ ÁËÂ. è  Ï ̇ ÒÚË Îfl ‚ ÔÓ ËÁ ‚ ‰Â ÌË -flı, ̇ ÔË Ò‡Ì Ì˚ı ‰Û„ Á‡ ‰Û „ÓÏ, ÔÓ ÓÈ Í‡ ÊÂÚ Òfl ̇ ÒÚÓθ ÍÓÂÁ ÍÓÈ Ë ÌÂ Ó ÊË ‰‡Ì ÌÓÈ, ˜ÚÓ Ì ‚Óθ ÌÓ ÓÊ ‰‡ ÂÚ Ì ‰Ó ÛÏ ÌËÂ:„‰Â Ê òÚ‡ ÛÒ ‚ÒÂ-Ú‡ ÍË Ì‡ ÒÚÓ fl ̆ ËÈ? ä ̃  ÏÛ ÓÌ ÓÚ ÌÓ ÒËÎ Òfl Ò -¸ ÂÁ ÌÓ? ä‡ ÍÓÈ ÓÌ Ì‡ Ò‡ ÏÓÏ ‰Â ÎÂ? ç ÛÊ ÎË ̋ ÚÓÚ ÍÓÏ ÔÓ ÁË ÚÓ,ÒÓ Á‰‡‚ ̄ ËÈ ‚ «ùÎÂ Í Ú Â» ‰ ‚‡ ÎË Ì ҇ Ï˚ ÔÛ „‡ ̨ ̆ Ë ‚ ÓÔ -ÌÓÈ ÎË Ú ‡ ÚÛ Â «ÒˆÂ Ì˚ ÒÛ Ï‡Ò ̄  ÒÚ ‚Ëfl», ·˚Î ËÒ Íβ ̃ Ë ÚÂθ ÌÓÛ‡‚ ÌÓ ‚ ̄ ÂÌ Ì˚Ï Ë ·Î‡ „Ó ÔÓ ÎÛ˜ Ì˚Ï ̃  ÎÓ ‚ ÍÓÏ, «ÔË ÓÊ ‰ÂÌ -Ì˚Ï ˛ÏÓ Ë Ò ÚÓÏ», Í‡Í ÓÚ Ï ̃ ‡Î êÓ ÏÂÌ êÓΠ·Ì?

ùÚÓÚ «ÔË ÓÊ ‰ÂÌ Ì˚È ˛ÏÓ ËÒÚ» Ì ‚Ò „‰‡ ÔÓ ËÁ ‚Ó ‰ËΠ̇ÒÓ ‚ ÏÂÌ ÌË ÍÓ‚ ÔË flÚ ÌÓ ‚Ô ̃ ‡Ú ΠÌËÂ. ÉÛ Ò Ú‡‚ å‡ Î ̇ ıÓ -‰ËÎ òÚ‡ Û Ò‡ ‚˚ ÒÓ ÍÓ Ï Ì˚Ï Ë Ô‡Í Ú˘ Ì˚Ï ˜Â ÎÓ ‚ ÍÓÏ, ÍÓ -ÚÓ ˚È «‚ÁË ‡ ÂÚ Ì‡ ‚ÒÂ Ò Í‡ ÍËÏ-ÚÓ ‡‚ ÌÓ ‰Û ̄ Ë ÂÏ». «é· ̆ ‡ flÒ¸ÒÓ òÚ‡ Û ÒÓÏ, – ÔË Ò‡Î ÓÌ, – ˜Û‚ ÒÚ ‚Û Â¯¸, Í‡Í Ú ·fl Ó· ‰‡ ÂÚ ıÓ -ÎÓ ‰ÓÏ. ü Ô‰ ÔÓ ̃ ÂÎ ·˚ ·˚Ú¸ ·Â‰ Ì˚Ï, ÌÓ Ì‡ ÒÎ‡Ê ‰‡Ú¸ ÒflÒÓÎÌ ̂ ÂÏ, ˜ÂÏ ·Ó ‰ËÚ¸ ‚ Ò˚ ÓÏ ÚÛ Ï‡ Ì». é ÒıÓ‰ ÌÓÏ ‚Ô ̃ ‡Ú -ΠÌËË ÔË Ò‡Î ëÚ‡ ‚ËÌ ÒÍËÈ, (ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚È ÓÚ ÌÓ ÒËÎ Òfl Í òÚ‡ Û ÒÛÍ‡È Ì ÒÍÂÔ ÚË ̃ Â Ò ÍË): «åÓ ÊÂÚ ·˚Ú¸, òÚ‡ ÛÒ ÛÏ ÂÚ Ó˜‡ Ó ‚˚ -‚‡Ú¸, ÌÓ ÓÌ Ì ÛÏ ÂÚ Á‡ ÒÚ‡ ‚ËÚ¸ ÒÎÛ ̄ ‡ Ú Îfl „ÎÛ ·Ó ÍÓ ˜Û‚ ÒÚ ‚Ó -‚‡Ú¸. ÇÓÁ ÏÓÊ ÌÓ ÔË ̃ Ë Ì‡ ‚ ÚÓÏ, ˜ÚÓ ÓÌ ÌË ÍÓ„ ‰‡ ÌË ̃  ÏÛ ÌÂÓÚ ‰‡ ‚‡Î Òfl ÔÓÎ ÌÓ ÒÚ¸˛: ÂÏÛ Ì‡ ‚Ò ·˚ ÎÓ Ì‡ ÔΠ‚‡Ú¸… ì Ï Ìfl‚‰Û„ ‚ÓÁ ÌËÍ Î‡ ÒÚ‡¯ ̇fl Ï˚Òθ. óÚÓ, ÂÒ ÎË ‚ ˜Ë Ò ÚË ÎË ̆  Ï -Ìfl Á‡ ÒÚ‡ ‚flÚ ÒÎÛ ̄ ‡Ú¸ òÚ‡ Û Ò‡?». ÇÓÁ ÏÓÊ ÌÓ, ˝ÚÓ «·ÂÒ ̃ Û‚ ÒÚ -‚Ë» Í ÓÍ Û Ê‡ ̨ ̆ ÂÈ ÊËÁ ÌË, ÔÓ‰ Ï ̃ ÂÌ ÌÓ ÒÓ ‚ ÏÂÌ ÌË Í‡ ÏË,ÓÚ ̃ ‡ Ò ÚË Ó·˙ flÒ Ìfl ÂÚ Ë ÔÂ Ò Ú Û˛ ÒÚË ÎË Ò ÚË ÍÛ Â„Ó ÔÓ ËÁ ‚ ‰Â -

Page 14: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

14

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

РУСС

КИЙ

ÌËÈ, Ë Ëı ÒÓ· ÒÚ ‚ÂÌ Ì˚È ı‡ ‡Í ÚÂ. äÓÏ ÔÓ ÁË ÚÓ ÒÎÓ‚ ÌÓ ÔË -ÏÂ Ë ‚‡Î ̇ Ò ·fl ‡Á Ì˚ ͇ ̇ ‚‡Î¸ Ì˚ ̇ fl ‰˚: ÚÓ „ ÓË ÍÓ-Ó Ï‡Ì ÚË ̃ Â Ò ÍË (‡Ì Ìflfl ÓÔ ‡ «ÉÛÌ Ú ‡Ï», 1893; ÒËÏ ÙÓ ÌË ̃  -Ò Í‡fl ÔÓ ̋ χ «ÜËÁ̸ „ Ófl», 1898), ÚÓ Ûθ Ú ‡ ÒÓ ‚  ÏÂÌ Ì˚Â,ÍË ̃ ‡ ̆ Ë (ÓÔ ˚ «ë‡ ÎÓ ÏÂfl», 1905; «ùÎÂ Í Ú ‡», 1908), ÚÓ Ì‡ -Ë‚ ÌÓ-Ó· ‚Ó Ó ÊË ÚÂθ Ì˚Â, ˝Î „‡ÌÚ Ì˚ («ä‡ ‚‡ ÎÂ Ó Á˚»,1910), ÚÓ ‡Ò Í Ú˘ Ì˚Â, ÒÚÓ „ËÂ, «ÒÚ‡ ËÌ Ì˚» (ÓÔ ‡ «ÄË ‡‰ -̇», 1916), ÚÓ ËÌ˚Â. àÒ ÔÓ ·Ó ‚‡‚ Ó‰ËÌ ÍÓ Ò Ú˛Ï, òÚ‡ ÛÒ ÓÒ -Ú‡‚ ÎflÎ Â„Ó Ë Ó· · ̃ ‡Î Òfl ‚ ÌÓ ‚˚È. éÌ ÔÓ ËÁ ‚Ó ‰ËÎ ‚Ô ̃ ‡Ú Π-ÌË ˜Â ÎÓ ‚ ͇, «Ë„ ‡ ̨ ̆  „Ó» ‚ Ú‚Ó ̃  ÒÚ ‚Ó, ÌÓ Ì ÔÓ ÊË ‚‡ ̨ -˘Â „Ó ÚÂı ˜Û‚ÒÚ‚, ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚ ÓÌ Ò‡Ï ÔË ‰Û Ï˚ ‚‡ ÂÚ (‚ÓÁ ÏÓÊ ÌÓ,Â„Ó ÏÛ Á˚ ͇ Ì ·˚ · ÒÚÓθ ÚÂÒ ÌÓ ÒÎË ÚÓÈ Ò Â„Ó ÒÛ ̆  ÒÚ ‚ÓÏ,Í‡Í ‚˚ ‡ Ê ÌË ÎË ̂ ‡, Í‡Í ÎÓ· Ë „· Á‡). é‰ Ì‡ ÍÓ ‚ Â„Ó ÔÓ ËÁ -‚ ‰Â ÌË flı ·˚ ÎÓ ÚÓ, ˜ÚÓ ÔË Ì‡‰ Πʇ ÎÓ ÚÓθ ÍÓ ÂÏÛ, ˜ÚÓ ·˚ -ÎÓ ÓÊ ‰Â ÌÓ ËÒ Íβ ̃ Ë ÚÂθ ÌÓ Â„Ó ıÛ ‰Ó Ê ÒÚ ‚ÂÌ Ì˚Ï ‰‡ ÓÏ.

«òÚ‡ ÛÒ – ˝ÚÓ Ì‡ ÒÚÓ fl ̆ ËÈ ‚ÛΠ͇Ì. åÛ Á˚ ͇ Â„Ó ÊÊÂÚ, ˜‡ -‰ËÚ, Ú ̆ ËÚ, ËÁ ‰‡ ÂÚ ÒÍ‚Â Ì˚È Á‡ Ô‡ı Ë ‚Ò ÒÏ ڇ ÂÚ Ì‡ Ò‚Ó ÂÏÔÛ ÚË», – ÔË Ò‡Î ‚Ò ÚÓÚ Ê êÓ ÏÂÌ êÓΠ·Ì, Ë ÚÛ‰ ÌÓ ‚˚ ‡ -ÁËÚ¸ Òfl ÚÓ˜ ÌÂÂ. ч, òÚ‡ ÛÒ Ë„ ‡Î, ÌÓ Ë„ ‡Î ÔÓ ÓÈ ·ÎÂ Ò Úfl -˘Â. ç  ÙÎÂÍ ÒËfl ÔÓ ÔÓ ‚Ó ‰Û ÏË ÌÛ‚ ̄  „Ó ËÎË Ì‡ ÒÚÓ fl ̆  „Ó·˚ · Â„Ó «ÍÓ̸ ÍÓÏ», ‡ „Ó ÚÓ‚ ÌÓÒÚ¸ Í ‰ÂÈ ÒÚ ‚˲, ÔÓ ÒÚÛÔ ÍÛ,ÏÓÎ ÌË Â ÌÓÒ ÌÓ ÏÛ «Ô˚Ê ÍÛ», ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚È ‚ÓÚ-‚ÓÚ ÒÓ ÒÚÓ ËÚ Òfl, ‚ÓÚ-‚ÓÚ ÔÓ Ú ·Û ÂÚ ÓÚ ̃ ‡ flÌ ÌÓ „Ó Ì‡ Ôfl Ê ÌËfl ÒËÎ. ê‡Á ÌÓ Ó· ‡Á -Ì˚ ÏÛ Á˚ ͇θ Ì˚ ÒÚË ÎË ÔÓ ‰Ó· Ì˚ ·̉ ̄ ‡Ù Ú‡Ï, ‚ ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚ı„Ó ÚÓ ‚Ó ‡Á ‚ ÌÛÚ¸ Òfl «‰ÂÈ ÒÚ ‚Ë» Â„Ó ÏÛ Á˚ ÍË, ÒÎ˯ ÍÓÏ ÏÓ˘ -ÌÓÂ, ˜ÚÓ ·˚ ÛÏÂ Ò ÚËÚ¸ Òfl ‚ Ô ‰Â ·ı Ó‰ ÌÓ „Ó ËÁ ÌËı.

Ç ˝ÚÓÏ ‡Î¸ ·Ó Ï Ô‰ ÒÚ‡‚ ΠÌ˚ ÔÓ ËÁ ‚ ‰Â ÌËfl, ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚ ̇ -ÔË Ò‡ ÎË «ÚË ‡Á Ì˚ı òÚ‡ Û Ò‡»: òÚ‡ ÛÒ- ·Â ÌÓÍ, ÚÓθ ÍÓ ÓÚ -

Page 15: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

15

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

РУСС

КИЙ

Í˚ ‚‡ ̨ ̆ ËÈ ‰Îfl Ò ·fl ÏÛ Á˚ ͇θ Ì˚È ÏË (êÓ Ï‡ÌÒ ‰Îfl Í· Ì -Ú‡ Ò Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú ÓÏ), òÚ‡ ÛÒ – β ·fl ̆ ËÈ Ë Ô ‰‡Ì Ì˚È ÒÛ ÔÛ„(ÔÂÒ ÌË «á‡ ‚ Ú ‡!» Ë «åÓ Â ÏÛ Â ·ÂÌ ÍÛ»), Ë òÚ‡ ÛÒ – ÏÛ ‰ ˆ, ÙË -ÎÓ ÒÓÙ ÒÍË ÒÏÓ Ú fl ̆ ËÈ Ì‡ ÓÒ Ú‡‚ ÎÂÌ Ì˚È ÔÓ Á‡ ‰Ë ÔÛÚ¸ (‚ÒÚÛÔ Î -ÌËÂ Í ÓÔ  «ä‡ Ô Ë˜ ̃ Ó» Ë äÓÌ ̂ ÂÚ ‰Îfl „Ó ·Ófl Ò Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú ÓÏ).

***è  ̃ Â̸ ‡Ì ÌËı ÔÓ ËÁ ‚ ‰Â ÌËÈ òÚ‡ Û Ò‡ Û‰Ë ‚Ë ÚÂθ ÌÓ

«Ì ‰ÂÚ ÒÍËÈ» (‚ÔÓÒ Î‰ ÒÚ ‚ËË ÍÓÏ ÔÓ ÁË ÚÓ ‰‡ Ê ÒÓ Ê‡ ÎÂÎ ÓÒÚÓθ Ì ̋ ÍÓ ÌÓÏ ÌÓ ‡Ò Ú‡ ̃ ÂÌ Ì˚ı ÒË Î‡ı). èÓ˜ ÚË ‚Ò ˝ÚÓ –ËÌ ÒÚ Û ÏÂÌ Ú‡Î¸ ̇fl ÏÛ Á˚ ͇, ÍÓ ÚÓ Û˛ òÚ‡ ÛÒ ÒÓ ̃ Ë ÌflÎ ÔÓ‰·‰Ë ÚÂθ Ì˚Ï ÔË ÒÏÓ Ú ÓÏ ÓÚ ̂ ‡ (ÎÛ˜ ̄  „Ó ‚‡Î ÚÓ ÌË Ò Ú‡ å˛Ì -ıÂÌ ÒÍÓ „Ó Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú ‡) Ë îË ‰ Ë ı‡ åÂÈ Â ‡ (‰Ë Ë Ê ‡ ÚÓ „ÓÊÂ Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú ‡). éÔ˚Ú Ì˚ ̇ ÒÚ‡‚ ÌË ÍË ·˚ ÎË ÍÓÌ Ò ‚‡ ÚÓ ‡ ÏË,ÒÚÓ ÓÌ ÌË Í‡ ÏË Ú‡ ‰Ë ̂ Ë ÓÌ ÌÓ „Ó ‡‚ ÒÚ Ó-̠ψ ÍÓ „Ó ËÒ ÍÛÒ ÒÚ -‚‡, Ë ˛ÌÓ „Ó êË ı‡ ‰‡ ÓÌË ‚ÓÒ ÔË Ú˚ ‚‡ ÎË Ì‡ åÓ ̂ ‡ ÚÂ, ɇȉ ÌÂ,ÅÂÚ ıÓ ‚ ÌÂ, òÛ ·Â ÚÂ, Ç ·Â Â, åÂÌ ‰Âθ ÒÓ ÌÂ. èÓ ÏË ÏÓ ËÁÛ -˜Â ÌËfl «Ó· ‡Á ̂ Ó‚», òÚ‡ ÛÒ ËÏÂÎ ‚ÓÁ ÏÓÊ ÌÓÒÚ¸ Ò‡Ï «‡Ò ÔÓ -·Ó ‚‡Ú¸» ‡Á Ì˚ ËÌ ÒÚ Û ÏÂÌ Ú˚. éÌ Ë„ ‡Î ̇ ÌËı ‚ β ·Ë ÚÂθ -ÒÍÓÏ Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú Â, ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚Ï Û ÍÓ ‚Ó ‰ËÎ Â„Ó ÓÚˆ. í‡Í ÔÓ fl‚Ë -ÎËÒ¸ ̇ Ò‚ÂÚ, ̇ ÔË ÏÂ, äÓÌ ̂ ÂÚ ‰Îfl ÒÍËÔ ÍË, äÓÌ ̂ ÂÚ ‰Îfl‚‡Î ÚÓ Ì˚, êÓ Ï‡ÌÒ ‰Îfl ‚Ë Ó ÎÓÌ ̃  ÎË Ò Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú ÓÏ Ë êÓ Ï‡ÌÒ‰Îfl Í· Ì ڇ. ìÒ Î˚ ̄ ‡‚ ˝ÚÓÚ ÔÓ ÒΉ ÌËÈ, ÌÂθ Áfl Ì ÛÎ˚· -ÌÛÚ¸ Òfl: ‚‰¸ ÏÓ„ Ê ·Û ‰Û ̆ ËÈ ÚË Ú‡Ì Ó· ‡ ̆ ‡Ú¸ Òfl Ò Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú -ÓÏ ‡Í ÍÛ ‡Ú ÌÓ, ÌÂÊ ÌÓ Ë «ÔÓ Ô‡ ‚Ë Î‡Ï»! ä‡Í ÚÛÚ Ì ‚ÒÔÓÏ -ÌËÚ¸ ̇ ÁË ‰‡ ÚÂθ Ì˚ ۂ ̆  ‚‡ ÌËfl Â„Ó ÓÚ ̂ ‡: «ÑÓ Ó „ÓÈ êË -ı‡‰, ÔÓ Ê‡ ÎÛÈ ÒÚ‡, ÍÓ„ ‰‡ ÒÓ ̃ Ë Ìfl ¯¸ ˜ÚÓ-ÎË ·Ó ÌÓ ‚ÓÂ, ÒÚ‡ -‡È Òfl, ˜ÚÓ ·˚ ÔÓ ËÁ ‚ ‰Â ÌË ÔÓ ÎÛ ̃ ‡ ÎÓÒ¸ Ï ÎÓ ‰Ë˜ Ì˚Ï, ÌÂÒÎ˯ ÍÓÏ ÚÛ‰ Ì˚Ï Ë ıÓ Ó ̄ Ó Á‚Û ̃ ‡ ÎÓ ‚ Ô  ÎÓ Ê ÌËË ‰Îfl

Page 16: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

РУСС

КИЙ

16

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS Í· ‚Ë ‡». óÚÓ Ê, ‚ÔÓÒ Î‰ ÒÚ ‚ËË ÓÚˆ ÌÂ Ó‰Ó · flÎ ÏÛ Á˚ ÍË Ò˚ -

̇, ÌÓ ‚ ÚÛ ÔÓ Û, ÍÓ„ ‰‡ ÔflÚ Ì‡‰ ̂ ‡ ÚË ÎÂÚ ÌËÈ Ï‡Î¸ ̃ ˯ ͇ ÔË Ò‡ÎêÓ Ï‡ÌÒ ‰Îfl Í· Ì ڇ, ÓÚˆ ¢ ÏÓ„ ËÏ „Ó ‰ËÚ¸ Òfl. Ç ˝ÚÓÈԸ Ò ‚Ò «‚ ÌÓ Ï», Ë ÙÓ Ï‡ Ë „‡ ÏÓ ÌËfl; · Ò ÍÓ ‚‡fl Ô ÒÂÌ -̇fl Ô ‚‡fl Ú χ, ÒÚÓθ Ê ÌÂÊ Ì‡fl ‚ÚÓ ‡fl, ÚÂÏ Ì ̨ ̆ ‡fl ÍÍÓÌ ̂ Û, Ë ÓÏ ‡ ̃ ‡ ̨ ̆ ‡fl Ó· ̆ ËÈ ÍÓ ÎÓ ËÚ Ú ڸfl, ÒÛ Ó ‚Ó ÓÚ ̃  -͇ ÌÂÌ Ì‡fl ‚ÒÂÈ ÒÚÛÌ ÌÓÈ „ÛÔ ÔÓÈ.

èÓÁ ÊÂ, ÓÒ ‚Ó ·Ó ‰Ë‚ ̄ ËÒ¸ ÓÚ ÓÍÓ‚ Ó ÚÓ ‰ÓÍ Ò‡Î¸ ÌÓ „Ó ‚ÓÒ ÔË -Ú‡ ÌËfl, ÛÁ ̇‚ ÏÛ Á˚ ÍÛ ãË Ò Ú‡ Ë Ç‡„ Ì ‡, òÚ‡ ÛÒ Á‡ ·Ó ÒËÎÔÂÊ ‰Â β ·Ë Ï˚ ËÌ ÒÚ Û ÏÂÌ Ú‡Î¸ Ì˚ ʇ Ì ˚. Ö„Ó ‚ÌË Ï‡ ÌËÂÔË ‚ÎÂÍ Î‡ Ò̇ ̃ ‡ · ÒËÏ ÙÓ ÌË ̃ Â Ò Í‡fl ÔÓ ̋ χ, ‡ Á‡ ÚÂÏ ÓÔ ‡.ã˯¸ ÔÓ‰ ÍÓ Ìˆ ÊËÁ ÌË ÓÌ ‚ ÌÛÎ Òfl Í ËÒ ÚÓ Í‡Ï – ˜Ë Ò ÚÓÈ ËÌ -ÒÚ Û ÏÂÌ Ú‡Î¸ ÌÓÈ ÏÛ Á˚ ÍÂ.

***äÓÏ ÔÓ ÁË ÚÓ, ̇ ÔË Ò‡‚ ̄ ËÈ ÔÂÒ ÌË «á‡ ‚ Ú ‡!» Ë «åÓ Â ÏÛ Â -

·ÂÌ ÍÛ», – ˝ÚÓ ÛÊ ‰Û „ÓÈ òÚ‡ ÛÒ. ùÚÓ ÔË Ï Ì˚È Ò ϸ fl -ÌËÌ Úˉ ̂ ‡ ÚË – Úˉ ̂ ‡ ÚË Ò Ì ·Óθ ̄ ËÏ ÎÂÚ, ·ÂÁ Ô‡ Ïfl Ú˂β· ÎÂÌ Ì˚È ‚ Ò‚Ó˛ Ê ÌÛ è‡ Û ÎË ÌÛ å‡ Ë˛ ‰Â ÄÌ ÌÛ. è‡ ‡ -‰ÓÍÒ, Ó ÍÓ ÚÓ ÓÏ Ì ÏÓ„ ÎË ÏÓÎ ̃ ‡Ú¸ ÌË Ó ‰Ë Ú ÎË, ÌË Á̇ ÍÓ -Ï˚Â, ÌË ·Ë Ó „‡ Ù˚ òÚ‡ Û Ò‡: ‰‡ χ ÒÓ ÒÍ‚Â ÌÂÈ ̄ ËÏ ı‡ ‡Í Ú -ÓÏ, ͇ Ô ËÁ ̇fl, ‚Ûθ „‡ ̇fl Ë ·ÂÒ Ú‡ÍÚ Ì‡fl (ÌÓ ÔË ˝ÚÓÏÓ˜Â̸ ÏË ÎÓ ‚ˉ ̇fl), ‚˚ Á˚ ‚‡‚ ̄ ‡fl Û ‚ÒÂı, ÍÚÓ Á̇Π ΢ ÌÓ,„ÎÛ ·Ó ÍÛ˛ Ì ÔË flÁ̸, ÒÓ ÒÚ‡ ‚Ë Î‡ Ò˜‡ Ò Ú¸Â ‚ÒÂÈ Â„Ó ÊËÁ ÌË.éÌË ÔÓ ÊË ÎË ‚ÏÂ Ò Ú ÔflÚ¸ ‰Â ÒflÚ ÔflÚ¸ ÎÂÚ ‚ β· ‚Ë Ë ÒÓ „· -ÒËË. è‡ Û ÎË Ì‡ ·˚ · Ô ‚Ë ̂ ÂÈ, Ë Â ͇ ¸  ‡ ÛÒ Ô¯ ÌÓ Ì‡ ̃ Ë Ì‡ -·Ҹ ‚ ÎÛ˜ ̄ Ëı ̠ψ ÍËı Ú ‡ Ú ‡ı. èÓ Ê ÌË‚ ̄ ËÒ¸, Ò˜‡ ÒÚ ÎË -‚˚ ÒÛ ÔÛ „Ë ÏÌÓ „Ó ‚˚ ÒÚÛ Ô‡ ÎË ‚‰‚Ó ÂÏ. é̇ Ô · Â„Ó ÒÓ ̃ Ë -Ì ÌËfl, ÓÌ ‡Í ÍÓÏ Ô‡ ÌË Ó ‚‡Î ÂÈ Ì‡ Ó fl ÎÂ.

Page 17: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

17

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

РУСС

КИЙ

ã˛ ·Ó ‚¸˛ Ë ÌÂÊ ÌÓ Ò Ú¸˛ ‰˚ ̄ ËÚ Í‡Ê ‰˚È Á‚ÛÍ Ô‰ ÒÚ‡‚ -ÎÂÌ Ì˚ı ‚ ̋ ÚÓÏ ‡Î¸ ·Ó Ï Ô ÒÂÌ (Ó·Â ÓÌË ÔÓ Ò‚fl ̆  Ì˚ è‡ Û ÎË ÌÂ,«‰‡ Ê‡È ̄ ÂÈ ÒÛ ÔÛ „», «Ëı ÎÛ˜ ̄ ÂÈ ËÒ ÔÓÎ ÌË ÚÂθ ÌË ̂ »). «á‡ ‚ -Ú ‡!» ̇ ÒÚË ıË ÉÂ Ì Ë å‡Í ÍÂfl ·˚ ÎÓ Ì‡ ÔË Ò‡ ̇ ÍÓ ‰Ì˛ Ò‚‡‰¸ -·˚ (10 ÒÂÌ Úfl · fl 1894 „.), ÍÓ Î˚ ·Âθ ̇fl «åÓ Â ÏÛ Â ·ÂÌ ÍÛ» ̇ÒÚË ıË ÉÛ Ò Ú‡ ‚‡ î‡Î¸ Í ÒÓ Á‰‡ ̇ Í „Ó ‰Ó‚ ̆ Ë Ì ÓÊ ‰Â ÌËfl‰ËÌ ÒÚ ‚ÂÌ ÌÓ „Ó Ò˚ ̇ î‡Ì ̂ ‡ (12 ‡Ô  Îfl 1898 „.). ùÚË ÔÂÒ -ÌË òÚ‡ ÛÒ Ò‡Ï Ô  Í· ‰˚ ‚‡Î ‰Îfl „Ó ÎÓ Ò‡ Ë Í‡ Ï ÌÓ „Ó ‡Ì -Ò‡Ï · Îfl, ÌÓ ‚ ‰‡Ì ÌÓÏ ‡Î¸ ·Ó Ï ÓÌË ËÒ ÔÓÎ Ì Ì˚ ‚ Ú‡ÌÒ ÍËÔ -ˆËË åË ı‡ Ë Î‡ ìÚ ÍË Ì‡ (‚Ó Í‡Î¸ ÌÛ˛ Ô‡ Ú˲ Ë„ ‡ ÂÚ „Ó ·ÓÈ).

ëÚË ıÓ Ú‚Ó Â ÌË ÉÂ Ì Ë å‡Í ÍÂfl – Ó ‰‚Ûı ‚β· ÎÂÌ Ì˚ı, ÍÓ -ÚÓ ˚Ï ÎÛ ̃ Ë ÒÓÎÌ ̂ ‡ ‰‡ flÚ ‚ÓÁ ÏÓÊ ÌÓÒÚ¸ ÒÓ Â‰Ë ÌËÚ¸ Òfl ‚ÌÓ‚¸:Û ‰‡ ΠÍÓ „Ó ÏÓ ÒÍÓ „Ó ·Â  „‡ ̇ ÌËı ÓÔÛ Ò Í‡ ÂÚ Òfl «Ò˜‡ Ò Ú¸Â Ì -ÏÓ „Ó ÏÓÎ ̃ ‡ ÌËfl». èÓ Ï˚Ò ÎË òÚ‡ Û Ò‡, ·Î‡ ÊÂÌ ÌÓ ÒÓ ÒÚÓ fl ÌËÂÒÛ ÎflÚ ÛÊ Ô ‚˚ ÒÚÓ ÍË ÒÚË ıÓ Ú‚Ó Â ÌËfl, – ˝ÚÓ ÒÓ ÒÚÓ fl ÌËÂÍ‡Í ·Û‰ ÚÓ ‚ÓÁ ÌËÍ ÎÓ Â˘Â ‰‡‚ ÌÓ, ‡ Ú Ô¸ ÚÓθ ÍÓ ‰ÎËÚ Òfl Ë‚Ó ÁÓ· ÌÓ‚ Îfl ÂÚ Òfl: «à Á‡ ‚ Ú ‡ ÒÓÎÌ ̂  ·Û ‰ÂÚ Ò‚Â ÚËÚ¸ ÒÌÓ ‚‡, Ë̇ ÔÛ ÚË, ÔÓ ÍÓ ÚÓ Ó ÏÛ fl ·Û ‰Û ˉ ÚË, ÓÌÓ Ì‡Ò, Ò˜‡ ÒÚ ÎË‚ ̂ ‚, ÒÓ -Â‰Ë ÌËÚ ÒÌÓ ‚‡». ÑÎËÌ ÌÓ ËÌ ÒÚ Û ÏÂÌ Ú‡Î¸ ÌÓ ‚ÒÚÛÔ Î ÌËÂÔ‰ ̄  ÒÚ ‚Û ÂÚ ÔÓ fl‚ ΠÌ˲ ‚Ó Í‡Î¸ ÌÓÈ Ï ÎÓ ‰ËË, „Ó ÎÓ ÒÛ ÓÒ Ú‡ -ÂÚ Òfl ÚÓθ ÍÓ «ÔÓÈ Ï‡Ú¸» Á‡ ÍÛ„ Îfl ̨ ̆ Û ̨ Òfl Ú ÏÛ Ë ÔÓ‰ ÔÂÚ¸Ò‚Ó «ÒÌÓ ‚‡…, ÒÌÓ ‚‡…», Ë ‚ÌÓ‚¸ ̇˜ ÌÂÚ Òfl Ú‡ Ê Ú χ ÛÒÍËÔ ÍË, Ë ‚ÌÓ‚¸ ·Û ‰ÂÚ ‰ÎËÚ¸ Òfl ˉËÎ ÎË ̃ Â Ò ÍÓ ̇ ÒÚ Ó Â ÌËÂ.

èÂÒ Ìfl «åÓ Â ÏÛ Â ·ÂÌ ÍÛ» – ÍÓ Î˚ ·Âθ ̇fl. ÇÁ„Îfl‰ χ ÚÂ Ë ÛÒ -Ú ÂÏ Îfl ÂÚ Òfl ‚‚˚Ò¸, Ë Ì‡ ̃ Ë Ì‡ ÂÚ Òfl «·ÎÛÊ ‰‡ ̨ ̆ ËÈ Ì ·ÂÒ Ì˚ÈÔÓ ÎÂÚ» – ÚÛ ‰‡, „‰Â Ò ‰Ë Á‚ÂÁ‰ ÔË Ú‡ Ë Î‡Ò¸ ã˛ ·Ó‚¸. é̇Ò˚ ‚‡ ÂÚ Ú‡ ‚Û Ò˜‡ Ò Ú¸fl, ̇ ÔÓ ÂÌ ÌÛ˛ Á‚ Á‰ Ì˚Ï ÒË fl ÌË ÂÏ, Ë Ì -ÒÂÚ ˝ÚÓÚ ‰‡ ‚ÌËÁ, χ Î˚ ̄ Û. òÚ‡ ÛÒ ÒΠ‰Û ÂÚ ÔÓ ˝ÚÓÈ ÔÓ ÒÚ -

Page 18: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS
Page 19: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

HE

RM

ITA

GE

OR

CH

ES

TR

A

Page 20: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

20

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

РУСС

КИЙ

‡Ì ÒÚ ‚ÂÌ ÌÓÈ Ú‡ ÂÍ ÚÓ ËË „‡ ÏÓ ÌË ̃ Â Ò ÍËÏ «ÔÛ ÚÂÏ». Ö„Ó ÔÂÒ ÌflÚÂı ̃ ‡ ÒÚ Ì‡. ä‡È ÌË ̃ ‡ Ò ÚË (Û ÍÓ Î˚ ·Â ÎË Â ·ÂÌ Í‡) ÛÒ ÚÓÈ ̃ Ë ‚˚Ë Ì ‚˚ ıÓ ‰flÚ Á‡ Ô ‰Â Î˚ ÓÒ ÌÓ‚ ÌÓÈ ÚÓ Ì‡Î¸ ÌÓ Ò ÚË Ù‡ χ ÊÓ(‚ Ú‡ÌÒ ÍËÔ ̂ ËË – ÒÓθ-·Â ÏÓθ χ ÊÓ): Ó·Â «‰Ó χ», «‚ÌË ÁÛ».Ç Ò  ‰Ë ÌÂ, ̇ ÔÓ ÚË‚, «·ÎÛÊ ‰‡ ̨ ̆ ËÈ Ì ·ÂÒ Ì˚È ÔÓ ÎÂÚ» Ë ÚÓ -̇θ Ì˚ ÔÓ ËÒ ÍË. «ã˛ ·Ó‚¸» fl‚ Îfl ÂÚ Òfl ‚ ËÒ ÍË Ò ÚÓÏ Ôˈ ̂ Ë Í‡ ÚÓË ÚÓ Ó ÔËÚ Òfl ‚ÌËÁ, Í Â ÔË ÁÂ, Í ÍÓ Î˚ ·Â ÎË Ï‡ Î˚ ̄ ‡.

***é ÔÓ ÒΉ ÌÂÏ ‰Â Òfl ÚË Î ÚËË ÊËÁ ÌË òÚ‡ Û Ò‡ ·Ë Ó „‡ Ù˚

Ó·˚˜ ÌÓ ÔË ̄ ÛÚ Ò ·Óθ ̄ ËÏ Û‰Ó ‚Óθ ÒÚ ‚Ë ÂÏ. äÓÏ ÔÓ ÁË ÚÓ ·˚Î̇ ۉ˂ ΠÌË ҂ ÚÂÎ, Ò‚ÂÊ, ÔÓ ÎÓÌ Ú‚Ó ̃ Â Ò ÍËı ÒËÎ Ë ÒÓ Á‰‡ -‚‡Î ‡· ÒÓ Î˛Ú ÌÓ ÌÓ ‚Û˛ ‰Îfl Ò ·fl ÏÛ Á˚ ÍÛ – ÏÛ Á˚ ÍÛ ÍË Ò Ú‡Î¸ -ÌÓÈ ˜Ë Ò ÚÓ Ú˚ Ë flÒ ÌÓ Ò ÚË. ä ÚÓ ÏÛ ‚ Ï ÌË ÓÌ ‰Ó ÒÚË„ ‚Ò „Ó, Ó˜ÂÏ ÏÓ„ Ϙ Ú‡Ú¸. ÇÒ ‚ ̄ Ë Ì˚ ·˚ ÎË ÔÓ ÍÓ Â Ì˚, Ë ÓÒ Ú‡ ‚‡ -ÎÓÒ¸ Î˯¸ ÚÓ, Í ̃  ÏÛ ‰Ó ҠΠòÚ‡ ÛÒ Ì ËÒ Ô˚ Ú˚ ‚‡Î ÓÒÓ ·Ó „ÓËÌ Ú  ҇, – ‚Á„Îfl ÌÛÚ¸ ‚„ÎÛ·¸ Ò‡ ÏÓ „Ó Ò ·fl.

éÔ ‡ «ä‡ Ô Ë˜ ̃ Ó» ̇ ÔË Ò‡ ̇ ‚ „ËÚ Î ӂ ÒÍÓÈ É χ ÌËË ‚1940 – 1941 „Ó ‰‡ı. äÓÌ ̂ ÂÚ ‰Îfl „Ó ·Ófl – Ò‡ ÁÛ ÔÓ ÒΠ‚ÓÈ -Ì˚. Ç ÌËı ÌÂÚ Ë ÓÚ „Ó ÎÓ Ò Í‡ ÒÓ ‚ ̄ ‡ ̨ ̆ Ëı Òfl ‚ ÏË Â ÒÓ ·˚ ÚËÈ(«ü Ì ‚˚ ÌÓ ̄ Û Ú‡ „Ë ̃ Â Ò ÍÓÈ ‡Ú ÏÓ ÒÙ ˚ ÒÓ ‚ ÏÂÌ ÌÓ Ò ÚË», –Á‡ Ï ̃ ‡Î ÍÓÏ ÔÓ ÁË ÚÓ. – ü Ëϲ Ô‡ ‚Ó ÔË Ò‡Ú¸ ÚÛ ÏÛ Á˚ ÍÛ, ͇ -͇fl ÏÌ ̇ ‚ËÚ Òfl, Ì ԇ‚ ‰‡ ÎË?»).

«ä‡ Ô Ë˜ ̃ Ó» òÚ‡ Û Ò‡ – ˝ÚÓ ËÌ ÚÂÎ ÎÂÍ ÚÛ ‡Î¸ Ì˚È «Í‡ Ô ËÁ» ÓÔÓ ·Î χı ʇ Ì ‡, ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚È ÓÌÓ Ó‰ ÌÓ ‚ ÏÂÌ ÌÓ Ë Ó· ÒÛÊ ‰‡ -ÂÚ, Ë Ô‰ ÒÚ‡‚ Îfl ÂÚ, – Ó· ÓÔ Â. Ç ˆÂÌ Ú Â – ˝Ò Ú ÚË ̃ Â Ò Í‡fl‰ËÒ ÍÛÒ ÒËfl Ó ÚÓÏ, ˜ÚÓ ‚‡Ê ÌÂÂ: ÏÛ Á˚ ͇ ËÎË ÒÎÓ ‚Ó. òÚ‡ Û Ò‡ÔΠÌË Î‡ ˉÂfl ÒÓ Á‰‡ ÌËfl ÓÒ Ú Ó ÛÏ ÌÓ „Ó Ô‰ ÒÚ‡‚ ΠÌËfl ̇ ˝ÚÛÚ ÏÛ – «ÒÔ ‚‡ ÒÎÓ ‚Ó, ÔÓ ÚÓÏ ÏÛ Á˚ ͇ (LJ„ ÌÂ), ËÎË ÒÔ ‚‡

Page 21: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

21

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

РУСС

КИЙ

ÏÛ Á˚ ͇, ÔÓ ÚÓÏ ÒÎÓ ‚Ó (Ç ‰Ë), ËÎË ÚÓθ ÍÓ ÒÎÓ ‚Ó ·ÂÁ ÏÛ Á˚ ÍË(É ÚÂ), ËÎË ÚÓθ ÍÓ ÏÛ Á˚ ͇ ·ÂÁ ÒÎÓ‚ (åÓ ̂ ‡Ú)». Ç «ä‡ Ô Ë˜ ̃ Ó»Á‡ Ô ‚ÂÌ ÒÚ ‚Ó ÏÛ Á˚ ÍË ‡ ÚÛ ÂÚ ÍÓÏ ÔÓ ÁË ÚÓ, Á‡ „· ‚ÂÌ ÒÚ ‚ÓÔÓ ̋ ÁËË – ÔÓ ̋ Ú. é·‡ ‚β· Î Ì˚ ‚ Ó·‡ fl ÚÂθ ÌÛ˛ „‡ ÙË Ì˛å‡‰ ÎÂÌ, ̇ ÍÓ ÚÓ Û˛ ‚ÓÁ ÎÓ Ê ̇ ÓÚ ‚ÂÚ ÒÚ ‚ÂÌ ÌÓÒÚ¸ Á‡  ̄  -ÌË ÒÔÓ ‡: „·‚ Ì˚È ÚÓÚ, ÍÓ „Ó Ô‰ ÔÓ ̃ ÚÂÚ „‡ ÙË Ìfl. çÓ凉 ÎÂÌ ÍÓ Î· ÎÂÚ Òfl, ÂÈ Ì‡ ‚flÚ Òfl Ó·‡, ‡ ÓÒÓ ·ÂÌ ÌÓ ÏËÎ ‡‰  -ÒÓ ‚‡Ì Ì˚È ÂÈ ÒÓ ÌÂÚ, ÏÛ Á˚ ͇ ÍÓ ÚÓ Ó „Ó ÔË Ì‡‰ ΠÊËÚ ÍÓÏ ÔÓ -ÁË ÚÓ Û, ‡ ÒÎÓ ‚‡ ÔÓ ̋ ÚÛ. Ç Á‡ Íβ ̃ Ë ÚÂθ ÌÓÈ ÒˆÂ Ì ̨ ̇fl ÓÒÓ ·‡Ì‡ Ô‡Ò ÌÓ ËÒ Ô‡ ̄ Ë ‚‡ ÂÚ ÒÓ ‚ ڇ Û Ò‚Ó Â „Ó ÓÚ ‡ Ê ÌËfl ‚ Á ͇ -Π– Û‚˚, ÔË ÌflÚ¸  ̄  ÌË Ó̇ Ì ‚ ÒË Î‡ı. «ÅÓ¸ ·‡ ÏÂÊ ‰ÛÒÎÓ ‚ÓÏ Ë Á‚Û ÍÓÏ, – ÔË Ò‡Î òÚ‡ ÛÒ, – ·˚ · ‰Îfl Ï Ìfl ‚‡Ê ÌÂÈ -¯ÂÈ ÔÓ ·Î ÏÓÈ Ò Ò‡ ÏÓ „Ó Ì‡ ̃ ‡ · Ú‚Ó ̃ Â Ò ÍÓ „Ó ÔÛ ÚË Ë Á‡ ÍÓÌ -˜Ë ·Ҹ ‚ «ä‡ Ô Ë˜ ̃ Ó» ‚Ó ÔÓ ÒË ÚÂθ Ì˚Ï Á̇ ÍÓÏ».

ùÚ‡ «·Ó¸ ·‡» Ó˘Û ̆ ‡ ÂÚ Òfl ÛÊ ‚Ó ‚ÒÚÛÔ Î ÌËË Í ÓÔ Â, ̇ -ÔË Ò‡Ì ÌÓÏ ‰Îfl ÒÚÛÌ ÌÓ „Ó Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú ‡. éÌÓ ‚‚Ó ‰ËÚ ÒÎÛ ̄ ‡ Ú Îfl ‚ËÌ ÚÂÎ ÎÂÍ ÚÛ ‡Î¸ Ì˚È, ‡ ÙË ÌË Ó ‚‡Ì Ì˚È ÏË ÒÔÂÍ Ú‡Í Îfl-‡Á -Ï˚ ̄ ΠÌËfl, ÒÔÂÍ Ú‡Í Îfl-‡Á ‰Û ϸfl. ÉÓ ÎÓ Ò‡ ÒÚÛÌ Ì˚ı ËÌ ÒÚ Û -ÏÂÌ ÚÓ‚ ÒÓ Á‰‡ ̨ Ú ËÁ˚ Ò Í‡Ì ÌÛ˛ ÏÌÓ „Ó ÙË „Û ÌÛ˛ ‚flÁ¸, ‚ ÍÓ ÚÓ -ÓÈ ‰‚Ë ÊÛÚ Òfl ËÁfl˘ Ì˚ Ë ӄ ÎË Ù˚ – Í‡Ú ÍË ‚˚ ‡ ÁË ÚÂθ -Ì˚ ÏÓ ÚË ‚˚ (̇ ÌËı ÔÓ ÒÚ Ó Â Ì‡ Ë Ô ‚‡fl ҈ ̇ ÓÔ ˚). Ç Ì‡ -˜‡ ΠÓÌË ÒÓ ÒÛ ̆  ÒÚ ‚Û ̨ Ú ÏË ÌÓ, ‰Ó ÔÓÎ Ìflfl Ó· ̆ ËÈ Ó Ì‡ ÏÂÌÚ‡Á Ì˚ ÏË ÓÚ ÚÂÌ Í‡ ÏË ÒÏ˚Ò Î‡. çÓ ‚Ì Á‡Ô ÌÓ Ó‰ ̇ ÔÓ Ì‡ ̃ ‡ ÎÛÌ ÔË ÏÂÚ Ì‡fl ÙË „Û Í‡ ÓÚ ‰Â Îfl ÂÚ Òfl, Ò Í‡ Ú‡ ÒÚ Ó ÙË ̃ Â Ò ÍÓÈ ÒÍÓ -Ó ÒÚ¸˛ ÏÌÓ ÊËÚ Òfl ‚ ÔÓ ÒÚ ‡Ì ÒÚ ‚Â Ë Â ̄ Ë ÚÂθ ÌÓ, ‚· ÒÚ ÌÓÁ‡ fl‚ Îfl ÂÚ Ó Ò‚Ó ÂÏ Ô ‚ÓÒ ıÓ‰ ÒÚ ‚Â. чθ ÌÂÈ ̄  ÒÓ ÔÓ ÚË‚ Π-ÌËÂ, ÏÛ ̃ Ë ÚÂθ Ì˚ Ú Á‡ ÌËfl Ë ÔÓ ËÒ ÍË Á‡ ‚ ̄ ‡ ̨ Ú Òfl, Ó‰ ̇ ÍÓ,ÔË ÏË Â ÌË ÂÏ Ë ÛÒ ÎÓ‚ Ì˚Ï ‚ÓÁ ‚‡ ̆  ÌË ÂÏ Ì‡ ̃ ‡Î¸ ÌÓÈ „‡ ÏÓ -

Page 22: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

22

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

РУСС

КИЙ

ÌËË. ä‡Í Ò͇ Á‡Î òÚ‡ ÛÒ, «‚ ÏÛ Á˚ Í ÏÓÊ ÌÓ „Ó ‚Ó ËÚ¸ ‚Ò ̃ ÚÓıÓ ̃ ¯¸, Ú ·fl ÌË ÍÚÓ Ì ÔÓÈ ÏÂÚ». é‰ Ì‡ ÍÓ ÚÓ, ˜ÚÓ ÓÌ «„Ó ‚Ó -ËÚ» ‚Ó ‚ÒÚÛÔ Î ÌËË Í «ä‡ Ô Ë˜ ̃ Ó», Í‡Í ·Û‰ ÚÓ ÔÓ ÌflÚ ÌÓ...

äÓÌ ̂ ÂÚ ‰Îfl „Ó ·Ófl Ë Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú ‡ ·˚Π̇ ÔË Ò‡Ì òÚ‡ Û ÒÓÏ ÔÓÔÓÒ¸ ·Â ‡ÏÂ Ë Í‡Ì ÒÍÓ „Ó ÒÓÎ ‰‡ Ú‡ ÑÊÓ Ì‡ ‰Â ã‡Ì ÒË, ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚È‚ ÏË ÌÓ ‚ Ïfl ·˚Î „Ó ·Ó ËÒ ÚÓÏ ÔËÚÚ Ò·Û„ ÒÍÓ „Ó ÒËÏ ÙÓ ÌË ̃  -Ò ÍÓ „Ó Ó ÍÂ Ò Ú ‡. çË Ò ˜ÂÏ ÌÂθ Áfl Ô  ÔÛ Ú‡Ú¸ ̇ ÒÚ Ó Â Ì˽ÚÓÈ ÏÛ Á˚ ÍË, ‰‡ Ê ÂÒ ÎË Ì Á̇ڸ, ˜ÚÓ Â ‡‚ ÚÓ ÓÏ ·˚Î ÒÚ‡ -ˆ, ÛÊ ÓÚ Ï ÚË‚ ̄ ËÈ ‚ÓÒ¸ ÏË ‰Â Òfl ÚË Î ÚËÂ. ùÚÓ Ì‡ ÒÚ Ó Â Ì˘ ÎÓ ‚ ͇, ÍÓ ÚÓ ˚È Ò‚ÂÚ ÎÓ ÔÓ ̆ ‡ ÂÚ Òfl Ò ÏË ÓÏ, ÓÚ ‰Û ̄ Ë Á‡ -·‡‚ Îfl flÒ¸ ÔÓ ÒΉ ÌËÈ ‡Á. ç ÒÏÓ Ú fl ̇ ÚÓ, ˜ÚÓ Ô‡ ÚËfl „Ó ·ÓflÚ ·Û ÂÚ ‚Ë ÚÛ ÓÁ ÌÓ „Ó ‚· ‰Â ÌËfl ËÌ ÒÚ Û ÏÂÌ ÚÓÏ, ÏÛ Á˚ ͇ ÍÓÌ -ˆÂ Ú‡ Ì ÏÌÓÊ ÍÓ ‰ÂÚ Ò͇fl, Ë„ Û ̄ ˜ ̇fl. ÇÒ ˜Â Ú˚  ˜‡ Ò ÚË ‚χ ÊÓ Â. òÚ‡ ÛÒ-‚ÓÎ ̄ · ÌËÍ ‚˚ ‰Û Ï˚ ‚‡ ÂÚ Ú Ï˚ Ë ÔÛ Ò Í‡ ÂÚ Ëı‚ ÒÚ‡Ì ÒÚ ‚Ë ÔÓ ‡Á Ì˚Ï ˜‡ Ò ÚflÏ ÔÓ ËÁ ‚ ‰Â ÌËfl. íÓ Ú‡Ï, ÚÓÁ‰ÂÒ¸ ÏÂθ ͇ ÂÚ ÛÊ Á̇ ÍÓ Ï‡fl ÙË ÁË Ó ÌÓ ÏËfl, – ÌÓ ÚÓθ ÍÓ Ó‰ËÌÔ ÒÓ Ì‡Ê ‰Â ÏÓÌ ÒÚ Ë Û ÂÚ Á‡ ‚ˉ ÌÓ ÔÓ ÒÚÓ flÌ ÒÚ ‚Ó: ÔÓ fl‚ Îfl flÒ¸‚ ÔÓ ·Ó˜ ÌÓÈ Ô‡ ÚËË Ô ‚ÓÈ ˜‡ Ò ÚË, ÓÌ ÔÓ ıÓ ‰ËÚ ˜Â ÂÁ ‚ÂÒ¸ÍÓÌ ̂ ÂÚ Ë ‰Ó ÒÚË „‡ ÂÚ ÙË Ì‡ ·. ùÚÓ ÒÓ‚ ÒÂÏ Í‡Ú ÍËÈ ÏÓ ÚË‚, ÍÓ -ÚÓ ˚È ˜Â Ú˚ ÂÊ ‰˚, Ïfl„ ÍÓ, ÌÓ Ì‡ ÒÚÓÈ ̃ Ë ‚Ó ÒÚÛ ̃ ËÚ Òfl ‚ ÔÓ ‚ÚÓ -fl  Ï˚È Á‚ÛÍ (‚ ÌÂÏ ÂÒÚ¸ ˜ÚÓ-ÚÓ ÓÚ Ú Ï˚ «ÒÛ‰¸ ·˚», ÍÓ ÚÓ ‡flÚÓ „‡ ÂÚ Á‡ ÔΠ̃ Ó Ë Ì‡ ÔÓ ÏË Ì‡ ÂÚ Ó· ÓÒ Ú‡‚ ̄ ÂÏ Òfl ‚ Ï ÌË).

åÛ Á˚ ͇, ̇ ÔË Ò‡Ì Ì‡fl òÚ‡ Û ÒÓÏ ‚ ÔÓ ÒΉ ÌË „Ó ‰˚, ·˚ · ÓÂ„Ó ÒÓ· ÒÚ ‚ÂÌ Ì˚ı ˜Û‚ ÒÚ ‚‡ı, Ó ÚÓÏ, ˜ÚÓ „ÎÛ ·Ó ÍÓ Â„Ó ÚÓ „‡ ÎÓ.Ö Ì ıÓ ̃ ÂÚ Òfl Ò‡‚ ÌË ‚‡Ú¸ Ò ‚˚ ‡ Ê ÌË ÂÏ ÎË ̂ ‡ ‡‚ ÚÓ ‡; ÒÍÓ -ÂÂ, ˝ÚÓ ËÒ ÍÂÌ ÌËÈ „Ó ÎÓÒ Â„Ó ‰Û ̄ Ë.

LJ ‚‡ ‡ íËÏ ̃ ÂÌ ÍÓ

Page 23: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

23

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

DEUT

SCH

inst schrieb Romain Rolland an Richard Strauss: „Micherstaunt und amüsiert, dass einige Ihrer musikalischen Phrasensehr eng mit Ihrer Persönlichkeit verbunden sind; sie sind eben-so wenig von Ihnen zu trennen wie Ihr Gesichtsausdruck, IhreStirn, Ihre Augen: Es scheint, als ob diese genau Ihr ganzesWesen vermitteln. In einem solchen Ausmaß ist mir dies beianderen Komponisten noch nie aufgefallen. “Interessant, dassRolland die Strauss'schen „musikalischen Phrasen“ nicht mitGefühlen oder Gedanken ihres Autors verbindet, sondern nurmit dessen Äusseren, mit seinem Gesichtsausdruck oderGesichtszügen, die sicherlich individuell und unverwechselbarsind, aber für musikalische Assoziationen, so scheint es, denk-bar unpassend sind. Zweifellos war diese Bemerkung scherzhaftgemeint, aber es steckt etwas Wahres und Wesentliches darin.Betrachtet man die Windungen des Lebenswegs von Strauss, sokann man sich davon überzeugen, dass die Analogien kaumandere hätten sein können. Das schöpferische Leben des

E

Page 24: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

24

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

DEUT

SCH

Komponisten war äußerst lang: 80 von 85 Lebensjahrenschrieb er Musik. Er schrieb 8 Tondichtungen, 15 Opern, mehrals 150 Lieder und vieles andere. Dabei ist die stilistische Vielfalteiner der erstaunlichsten Züge seines Schaffens. Der Wechselder Stile in seinen aufeinander folgenden Werken ist bisweilenso brüsk und unerwartet, dass unwillkürlich Zweifel aufkommt:Wo ist denn nun der eigentliche Strauss? Was ist für ihn ernst?Wer ist er in Wirklichkeit? Kann es sein, dass der Komponist,der in der „Elektra“ die erschreckendsten „Szenen desWahnsinns“ der Opernliteratur schrieb, ein außergewöhnlichausgeglichener und glücklicher Mensch war? Ein „geborenerHumorist“, wie Romain Rolland bemerkte?

Dieser „geborene Humorist“ hinterließ bei seinenZeitgenossen nicht immer einen angenehmen Eindruck. GustavMahler sah in Strauss einen überheblichen und praktischenMenschen, der alles mit einer gewissen Gleichgültigkeitanschaut. „Während du dich mit Strauss unterhältst“, so schrieber, „fühlst du, wie dich eine Kälte überläuft. Ich würde es vorzie-hen, arm zu sein, aber die Sonne zu genießen, als durch feuch-ten Nebel zu wandern.“ Strawinsky (der ein äußerst skeptischesVerhältnis zu Strauss hatte) sprach über einen ganz ähnlichenEindruck: „Es kann sein, dass Strauss bezaubern kann, aber erversteht es nicht, den Zuschauer dazu zu bringen, tief zu fühlen.Vielleicht liegt der Grund darin, dass er sich nie einer Sache vollund ganz hingeben konnte: Ihm ist alles egal… Mir kam plötz-lich ein schrecklicher Gedanke. Was, wenn man mich imFegefeuer zwingen wird, Strauss zu hören?“ Möglich, dass gera-de diese von Zeitgenossen bemerkte „Gefühllosigkeit“ in Bezug

Page 25: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

25

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

DEUT

SCH

auf seine Umwelt teilweise auch die mannigfaltigen Stile seinerWerke erklärt und ihren eigentlichen Charakter ausmacht. DerKomponist hat sozusagen verschiedene Karnevalskostümeanprobiert: mal ein heldenhaft-romantisches (die frühe Oper„Guntram“, 1893; die symphonische Tondichtung „EinHeldenleben“, 1898), mal ein ultramodernes, schreiendes (dieOpern „Salome“, 1905; „Elektra“, 1908), mal ein naiv-bezau-berndes, elegantes („Der Rosenkavalier“, 1910), mal ein asketi-sches, strenges, „altertümliches“ (die Oper „Ariadne“, 1916),dann wieder ganz andere. Hatte er ein Kostüm ausprobiert, ließStrauß es zurück und legte ein neues an. Er machte denEindruck eines mit dem Schaffen „spielenden“ Menschen, deraber nicht die Gefühle, die er sich ausdenkt, selbst durchlebt(möglicherweise war seine Musik nicht so eng mit seinemWesen verbunden wie sein Gesichtsausdruck, wie seine Stirnund Augen). Trotzdem war in seinen Werken das enthalten, wasnur ihm allein gehörte, was ausschließlich durch seine künstleri-sche Begabung geboren wurde.

„Strauss ist ein echter Vulkan. Seine Musik brennt, qualmt,prasselt, riecht schlecht und fegt alles, was ihr im Weg steht,fort“, schreibt derselbe Romain Rolland, und es ist schwer, esgenauer auszudrücken. Ja, Strauss spielte, aber er spielte bis-weilen glänzend. Nicht die Reflexion über Vergangenes oderGegenwärtiges war sein „Steckenpferd“, sondern dieBereitschaft zur Handlung, zur Tat, zum blitzschnellen„Sprung“, der jetzt gleich stattfinden soll, jetzt gleich eine ver-zweifelte Anspannung der Kräfte erfordert. Die verschiedenarti-gen Musikstile gleichen Landschaften, in denen die „Handlung“

Page 26: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

26

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS seiner Musik bereit ist, sich zu entfalten, viel zu gewaltig, um in

eine ihrer Grenzen zu passen.Auf diesem Album sind Werke vorgestellt, die von „drei ver-

schiedenen Straussen“ geschrieben wurden: das Kind Strauss,das eben erst die Welt der Musik für sich entdeckt hat (Romanzefür Klarinette und Orchester), Strauss, der liebende und hinge-bungsvolle Ehemann (die Lieder „Morgen!“ und „MeinemKinde“), der Weise Strauss, der philosophisch den hinter ihmliegenden Weg betrachtet (Einleitung zur Oper „Capriccio“ undKonzert für Oboe und kleines Orchester D-Dur).

***Die Liste der frühen Werke Strauss' ist erstaunlich „unkind-

lich“ (später bedauerte der Komponist die unökonomisch ver-geudeten Kräfte). Es handelt sich fast ausschließlich umInstrumentalmusik, die Strauss unter der strengen Aufsicht sei-nes Vaters (erster Hornist am Hoforchester München) undFriedrich Wilhelm Meyers (Dirigent dieses Orchesters) kompo-nierte. Die erfahrenen Lehrer waren konservative Anhänger dertraditionellen österreichisch-deutschen Kunst und der jungeRichard wurde im Sinne von Mozart, Haydn, Beethoven,Schubert, Weber und Mendelssohn erzogen.

Neben des Studiums der „Vorbilder“ hatte Strauss dieMöglichkeit, selbst verschiedene Instrumente auszuprobieren. Erspielte sie in dem Laienorchester, das sein Vater leitete. So ent-standen, zum Beispiel, das Konzert für Geige, Konzert fürWaldhorn, die Romanze für Cello und Orchester und Romanzefür Klarinette. Hört man letzteres, muss man unwillkürlichlächeln: Der zukünftige Titan konnte tatsächlich mit dem

DEUT

SCH

Page 27: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

27

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

DEUT

SCH

Orchester akkurat, zärtlich und „nach den Regeln“ umgehen! Daerinnert man sich gleich an die Belehrungen seines Vaters: „Bittelieber Richard, wenn Du etwas Neues machst, sehe recht darauf,dass es melodisch und nicht zu schwer, und klaviermässig wird.“Nun, später hieß der Vater die Musik des Sohnes nicht mehr gut,aber in jener Zeit, als der 15-jährige Junge die Romanze fürKlarinette schrieb, konnte der Vater noch sehr stolz auf ihn sein.In diesem Stück entspricht alles der Norm, sowohl Form als auchHarmonie; das zärtliche liedhafte erste Thema, ebenso das wei-che Zweite, das um Ende dann dunkler wird, und das finster wer-dende allgemeine Kolorit des dritten Themas, das durch dieganze Streichergruppe streng geprägt ist.

Später, nachdem er sich von den Ketten der orthodoxenAusbildung befreit hatte, und die Musik Liszts und Wagners ken-nengelernt hatte, vernachlässigte Strauss die zuvor geliebtenInstrumentalgenres. Seine Aufmerksamkeit wurde anfangs vonder Tondichtung, dann von der Oper gefesselt. Erst kurz vor sei-nem Lebensende kehrte er zu seinen Wurzeln zurück, zur reinenInstrumentalmusik.

***Der Komponist, der die Lieder “Morgen!” und “Meinem

Kinde” schrieb, ist schon ein anderer Strauss. Er ist ein beispiel-hafter, ungefähr 30-jähriger Familienvater, der seine FrauPauline Maria de Ahna hingebungsvoll liebt. Ein Paradox, überdas weder die Eltern, noch die Bekannten und die BiografenStrauss’ schweigen konnten: Diese kapriziöse, vulgäre und takt-lose (aber sehr hübsche) Dame mit ihrem schwierigenCharakter, die bei allen, die sie persönlich kennenlernten, tiefen

Page 28: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

28

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS Widerwillen hervorrief, war das Glück seines ganzen Lebens.

Pauline war Sängerin, die ihre Karriere erfolgreich an denbesten deutschen Theatern begonnen hatte. Nachdem siegeheiratet hatten, traten die glücklichen Ehegatten oft zu zweitauf. Sie sang seine Werke, er begleitete sie auf dem Flügel.

Liebe und Zärtlichkeit atmet jeder Ton der auf dem Album vor-gestellten Lieder (sie sind beide Pauline gewidmet, der „teuerstenGattin“ und „ihrer besten Interpretin“). „Morgen!“ nach einemGedicht von John Henry Mackay wurde zum Hochzeitstag (10.September 1894) geschrieben, das Wiegenlied „Meinem Kinde“nach einem Gedicht von Gustav Falke zum ersten Geburtstag deseinzigen Sohnes Franz (12. April 1898). Diese Lieder hat Straussselbst für Stimme und Kammerensemble vertont, aber auf demvorliegenden Album wurden sie nach einer Transkription vonMikhail Utkin interpretiert.

Das Gedicht Henry Mackays handelt von zwei Verliebten,denen die Strahlen der Sonne die Möglichkeit schenken, sicherneut zu vereinen: Am fernen Meeresufer senkt sich auf sie„des Glückes stummes Schweigen“. Im Sinne Strauss' verheißenschon die ersten Zeilen des Gedichts diesen seligen Zustand, derirgendwie schon vor langer Zeit entstanden ist und bis jetztandauert und sich immer wieder erneuert: „Und morgen wirddie Sonne wieder scheinen, und auf dem Wege, den ich gehenwerde, wird uns, die Glücklichen, sie wieder einen, inmitten die-ser sonnenatmenden Erde“.

Eine lange instrumentale Einleitung geht der Vokalmelodievoran, der Stimme bleibt nur, das sich rundende Thema „einzu-fangen“ und ihr Eigenes „wieder…, wieder…“ zu singen, und

DEUT

SCH

Page 29: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

29

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

DEUT

SCH

erneut beginnt das selbe Thema der Geige, und wieder wird dieidyllische Stimmung andauern.

Das Lied „Meinem Kinde“ ist ein Wiegenlied, das die Mutterihrem kleinen Sohn singt. Der Blick strebt von der Wiege emporund es beginnt „ein schweifender Himmelsflug“ dorthin, wo sichzwischen den Sternen die Liebe versteckt. Sie bricht sich einGlückskraut aus reinem Glanz und Licht und bringt diese Gabedem Kindchen auf die Erde. Strauss folgt dieser ausgeklügeltenräumlichen Bahn auf dem „harmonischen“ Weg. Sein Lied istdreiteilig aufgebaut. Die äußeren Teile (an der Wiege des Kindes)sind fest und verlassen die Grenzen der zugrunde liegendenTonart F-Dur (in der Transkription Ges-Dur) nicht: beide sind„zuhause“ und „unten“. Im Gegensatz dazu finden in der Mitteder „schweifende Himmelsflug“ und entsprechend die Suchenach der Tonart statt. Die „Liebe“, umgeben vonPizzikatoakkorde, eilt hinunter zur Wiege des Babys.

***Über die letzten 10 Lebensjahre von Strauss berichten alle

Biografen mit großer Freude. Der Komponist war erstaunlichhell, frisch, voller schöpferischer Kraft und er schuf eine für ihnvöllig neue Musik – eine Musik von Kristall klarer Reinheit. Zudieser Zeit hatte er alles erreicht, wovon er träumen konnte. AlleGipfel waren erobert und übrig war nur noch der Bereich, fürden Strauss bisher kein besonderes Interesse empfand: der Blickin die eigene Seele. Die Oper „Capriccio“ schrieb er inHitlerdeutschland 1940–41, das Konzert für Oboe – direkt nachdem Krieg. In ihnen findet sich kein Nachhall der tiefgreifendenEreignisse dieser Zeit. Strauss behauptete, dass er die tragische

Page 30: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

30

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS Atmosphäre der Moderne nicht ertragen könnte, und setzte

hinzu: „Ich habe doch wohl das recht, die Musik zu schrieben,die mir paßt“.

Strauss' „Capriccio“ ist eine intellektuelle „Kaprice“ über dieProbleme des Genres Oper, die gleichzeitig besprochen undvorgestellt wird. Im Zentrum steht die ästhetische Diskussiondarüber, was wichtiger ist: die Musik oder das Wort. Strauss warvon der Idee der Schöpfung einer „geistreichen dramatischenParaphrase“ dieses Thema gefesselt: „Erst die Worte, dann dieMusik (Wagner) oder Erst die Musik, dann die Worte (Verdi) oderNur Worte, keine Musik (Goethe) oder Nur Musik, keine Worte(Mozart)“.

In „Capriccio“ tritt der Musiker für die Hauptrolle der Musikein, der Dichter für die des Wortes. Beide sind in die bezau-bernde Gräfin Madeleine verliebt, der die Verantwortung für dieLösung dieses Streits auferlegt wird: Der Wichtigste ist der, dendie Gräfin bevorzugt. Aber Madeleine schwankt, ihr gefallenbeide, besonders lieblich ist ein ihr gewidmetes Sonett, dessenMusik dem Musiker gehört und die Worte dem Dichter. In derSchlussszene fragt die junge Dame vergeblich ihr Spiegelbild umRat – o weh, sie ist nicht in der Lage, eine Entscheidung zu tref-fen: „Vergebliches Müh'n, die beiden zu trennen. In eins ver-schmolzen sind Worte und Töne – zu einem Neuen verbunden.Geheimnis der Stunde – eine Kunst durch die andre erlöst!“Eine solche Wendung der Ereignisse spiegelt die eigenen inner-sten Gedanken Strauss’ wider: „Der Kampf zwischen Wort undTon ist schon seit Beginn das Problem meines Lebens und mitCapriccio als Fragezeichen beendet!“

DEUT

SCH

Page 31: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

31

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

DEUT

SCH

Dieser „Kampf“ ist schon in der Einleitung zur Oper,geschrieben für Streichorchester, bemerkbar. Sie führt denHörer in die intellektuelle, raffinierte Welt der Meditationsoperein. Die Stimmen der Streicher schaffen eine vielfigurige, bizar-re Form, in der sich erlesene Hieroglyphen bewegen, kurze aus-drucksvolle Motive (auf denen auch die erste Szene der Operaufgebaut ist). Am Anfang existieren sie friedlich miteinander,indem sie ein gemeinsames Ornament mit verschiedenenNuancen des Sinns ausfüllen. Aber plötzlich trennt sich eineanfänglich unauffällige Figur ab und vervielfältigt sich mit kata-strophaler Geschwindigkeit im Raum (alle Instrumente greifensie der Reihe nach auf), und entschieden und machtvoll erklärtsie ihre Vorherrschaft. Dann folgt ein Bild des Widerstandes, desKampfes, der qualvollen Leiden und der Suche nach einemAusweg, das mit der Versöhnung und der vorläufigen Rückkehrzur anfänglichen Harmonie endet. Wie Strauss sagte, „in derMusik kann man alles, was man will, sagen, dich wird eh keinerverstehen.“ Allein das, was er in der Einleitung zu „Capriccio“sagt, erscheint uns irgendwie verständlich…

Das Konzert für Oboe und Orchester schrieb Strauss auf Bittedes amerikanischen Soldaten John de Lancie, der inFriedenszeiten Oboist des Pittsburgher Symphonieorchesterswar. Die Stimmung dieser Musik ist mit nichts zu verwechseln,selbst wenn man weiss, dass ihr Autor ein Greis war, der seinen80. Geburtstag schon hinter sich hatte. Es ist die Stimmung einesMenschen, der hell von der Welt Abschied nimmt, und sich dabeiein letztes Mal von ganzem Herzen amüsiert. Ungeachtet des-sen, dass die Partie der Oboe eine virtuose Beherrschung des

Page 32: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

32

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

DEUT

SCH

Instruments erfordert, hat die Musik des Konzerts etwas kindli-ches, spielerisches. Alle vier Sätze sind in Dur geschrieben. DerZauberer Strauss denkt sich Themen aus und entlässt sie dann indie Weite der verschiedenen Sätze des Werkes. Mal hier, mal dablitzt ein schon bekanntes Gesicht hervor.

Aber nur eine Person demonstriert beneidenswerteBeständigkeit: Das erste Mal taucht sie in dem Seitenthema desersten Satzes auf und zieht sich dann durch das ganze Konzertund erreicht das Finale. Es ist ein ganz kurzes Motiv, das vier-malig weich, aber beständig anklopft, sich dann verbeugt undmanchmal galant knickst. Es klingt jedesmal anders: mal zart beiden Streichern, mal spielerisch bei der Oboe, mal nachdenklichmit gespielter Wichtigkeit beim Waldhorn. Anfangs hält es sichstreng, aber im Finale dreht es sich in einem berauschendenWalzer, und sogar in den Schlussakkorden des Konzerts, die denletzten Punkt setzen, errät man sein rhythmisches Bild. In ihmist etwas vom Thema des „Schicksals“, das einem auf dieSchulter klopft und einen an die verbleibende Zeit erinnert. Dievier Sätze entsprechen vier verschiedenen Facetten des Lebens.Der erste Satz (Sonatenallegro) ist ein echter Konzertwettbe-werb zwischen Oboe und Orchester. Die Teilnehmer spielenabwechselnd verschiedene Themen, eins besser als das andere,und dieser Einfallsreichtum scheint endlos. Der zweite Satz istdie friedvolle, eindringliche Erzählung der Oboe über die wun-derbarsten Momente des Lebens. Der dritte ist ein amüsantesund bizarres Scherzo. Sein Hauptthema ist einem ungeschick-tem Wunderling ähnlich, der sich lustig watschelnd fortbewegt(das abgehackte Stakkato der Streicher und im Weiteren auch

Page 33: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

33

DE

LIC

AT

E S

TR

AU

SS

DEUT

SCH

der Holzbläser) und dann alle durch die Töne seiner Zauberflötezusammen ruft (ein Seitenthema der Oboe). Am Ende dann derbunte Abschiedswalzer, in dem Einen Erinnerungen an die zärt-lichen und ausgelassen Wiener Walzer aus dem „Rosenkavalier“anwehen.

Die Musik, die Strauss in den letzten Jahren schrieb, handeltvon seinen eigenen Gefühlen, von dem, was ihn zutiefst berühr-te. Mit seinem Gesichtsausdruck kann man sie nun wohl kaumnoch gleichsetzen, sie ist vielmehr untrennbar mit demKomponisten verbunden, so wie seine eigene Seele.

Warwara Timtschenko, übersetzt von Monika Hollacher

Page 34: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

AL

EX

EI

UT

KIN

& T

HE

HE

RM

ITA

GE T

he oboe is one of the most capricious instruments, how-ever in the hands of Alexei Utkin it is distinguished by itsexemplary obedience. Nowadays there are not so many

touring oboists, endowed with a flawless technique and pos-sessing special breathing methods (a melody in performance byAlexei Utkin seems to be endless). He has the ability to createsounds, which are virtually impossible to play on the oboe.However, all of this is not so important for him, since he ismuch more avidly concerned on ‘over-instrumental’ problems.

An extraordinary soloist in his own right, Utkin has in duetime felt that he was in need of his own ensemble: ‘I’ve beenperforming a lot with Moscow Virtuosi. But I was always think-ing that almost everything could be played in another way. Yes,the orchestra performed nice, and I played okay but not exact-ly in a way I would really like it’.

Thus, in 2000 the Hermitage Chamber Orchestra hasappeared, a string orchestra, directed by an oboe player (pos-sibly the only example in our time!). The orchestra had startedfrom baroque and classical repertoire, but soon began to per-form the works of romantic composers as well as the music of20th century. Since 2003 Alexei Utkin and the HermitageChamber Orchestra have been recording with Caro Mitis.

As for this project, Alexei Utkin tells: ‘All the works pre-sented in this album are grouped around the Oboe Concerto, aprofound and lovely composition for the soloist and smallorchestra (we perform it with minimal number of musicians).We would like to show quite unusual Strauss: not expressionis-tic, but tender, vulnerable and delicate’...

34

Page 35: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

AL

EX

EI

UT

KIN

& T

HE

HE

RM

ITA

GE

35

An extraordinary soloist in his own right, Alexei Utkin has in duetime felt that he was in need of his own ensemble. Thus, in

2000 the Hermitage has appeared – a string orchestra, directed byan oboe player (possibly the only example in our time!). The Frenchword ‘ermitage’ means ‘seclusion’. However, ‘seclusion’ is hardly afitting description for such an intensive concert activity with a con-stant flow of tours both in Russia and abroad, which the HermitageChamber Orchestra is presently engaged in.

Alexei Utkin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . oboe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1, 3–6, 8);. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . oboe d'amore. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2)

Pyotr Nikiforov . . . . . . . . . . . . 1st violin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8) Ilya Norshtein . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1st violin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8)Larisa Karpenko . . . . . . . . . . . 1st violin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8)Anna Poletaeva . . . . . . . . . . . . 2nd violin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8)Nadezhda Sergiyenko . . . . . . . 2nd violin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8)Andrei Barzov . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2nd violin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8)Fyodor Belugin . . . . . . . . . . . . viola . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8)Zoya Nevolina . . . . . . . . . . . . . viola . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8)Ekaterina Dossina . . . . . . . . . . cello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8)Olga Kazantseva . . . . . . . . . . . cello . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8) Gleb Chernobrovkin . . . . . . . . double bass . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1–8)Maria Chepurina . . . . . . . . . . . flute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (1; 3–6)Malika Mukhitdinova . . . . . . . . flute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3–6) Philipp Nodel . . . . . . . . . . . . . English horn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (3–6)Eugeny Petrov . . . . . . . . . . . . clarinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2–6)Valentin Uryupin . . . . . . . . . . . clarinet . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2–6)Michael Shilenkov . . . . . . . . . . bassoon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2–6)Nikolai Zenkin . . . . . . . . . . . . bassoon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2–6)Fyodor Yarovoi . . . . . . . . . . . . horn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2–6)Philipp Korolkov . . . . . . . . . . . horn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (2–6)

Page 36: Richard Strauss(1864–1949) DELICATE STRAUSS

RECORDING DETAILS

Microphones – Neumann km130DPA (B & K) 4006 ; DPA (B & K) 4011

SCHOEPS mk2S ; SCHOEPS mk41

All the microphone buffer amplifiers and pre-amplifiers are PolyhymniaInternational B.V. custom built.

DSD analogue to digital converter – Meitner design by EMM Labs.Recording, editing and mixing on Pyramix system by Merging

Technologies.

Recording Producer – Michael SerebryanyiBalance Engineer – Erdo Groot

Recording Engineer – Roger de SchotEditor – Carl Schuurbiers

Recorded: Recorded: 12–13, 15.11.2005The 5th Studio of The Russian Television and Radio Broadcasting Company

(RTR)

2006 Essential Music, #16 b-2, Volokolamskoye shosse,Moscow, 125080, Russia

2006 Му зы ка Мас сам,125080, Москва,Волоколамское шоссе, д. 16б, корп.2

www.caromitis.com www.essentialmusic.ru

P & C

P & C

CM 0062005