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Program of Max Planck Institute for compassion studies

Transcript of ProgrHow to train compassion

MAX PLANCK INSTITUTE

FOR HUMAN COGNITIVE AND BRAIN SCIENCES LEIPZIG

How to Train Compassion

July 20th to July 24th, 2011 Berlin, Germany

Content

Schedule .........................................................................................................................6 Abstracts ......................................................................................................................11 Short Biographies ..................................................................................................20 Map overview with Locations.......................................................................32 Berlin Sights and Restaurant Suggestions...........................................35

Workshop Venue: Studio Olafur Eliasson Christinenstrae 18/19 Haus 2 10119 Berlin Germany http://www.olafureliasson.net

Contact during workshop: Matthias Bolz: Sandra Zurborg: +49 (0)163 8350683 +49 (0)1577 6056912

Host Institution: Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences Stephanstrae 1 a D-04103 Leipzig, Germany info@cbs.mpg.de www.cbs.mpg.de Editing: Matthias Bolz Layout: Multimedia & Graphics Berlin, July 2011

Schedule

Wednesday, July 20th, 20117:30 pm 8:00 10:00 pm Departure Shuttle from the Hotel Welcome Reception and Introductory Remarks at the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities Jgerstrae 22/23

6

Schedule

Thursday, July 21st, 20117:30 8:30 am 8:30 9:00 am 9:00 9:30 am 9:30 10:00 am 10:00 11:00 am Breakfast at Studio Eliasson Introductory Remarks Tania Singer & Olafur Eliasson Morning Meditation with Matthieu Ricard Refreshment Break Cultivating Compassion from a Buddhist Perspective Matthieu Ricard, Barry Kerzin, & Diego Hangartner Curriculum for Physicians and Nurses in Compassion and Ethics Joan Halifax Refreshment Break Morning Discussion Chairs: J. Grant & B. Bernhardt Panel: M. Ricard, B. Kerzin, D. Hangartner, & J. Halifax Lunch Compassion-Focused Therapy Paul Gilbert Mindful Self-Compassion Training Kristin Neff & Christopher K. Germer Refreshment Break Afternoon Discussion Chairs: N. Steinbeis & J. Smallwood Panel: P. Gilbert, K. Neff, C. K. Germer, & J. Latzel Afternoon Meditation with Matthieu Ricard Personal Time Reception with Olafur Eliasson & Dinner

11:00 12:00 pm

12:00 12:15 pm 12:15 1:15 pm

1:15 2:30 pm 2:30 3:30 pm 3:30 4:30 pm 4:30 5:00 pm 5:00 6:00 pm

6:00 6:30 pm 6:30 8:00 pm 8:00 pm

7

Schedule

Friday, July 22nd, 20118:00 9:00 am 9:00 9:30 am 9:30 10:00 am 10:00 11:00 am 11:00 12:00 pm 12:00 12:15 pm 12:15 1:15 pm Breakfast at Studio Eliasson Morning Meditation with Diego Hangartner Refreshment Break The Cultivating Emotional Balance Project Margaret Kemeny Cognitive-Based Compassion Training Brooke Dodson-Lavelle & Brendan Ozawa-de Silva Refreshment Break Morning Discussion Chairs: V. Engert & N. Mendes Panel: M. Kemeny, B. Dodson-Lavelle, B. Ozawa-de Silva, & E. Simon-Thomas Lunch Compassion Cultivation Training Program Erika L. Rosenberg Short-Term Compassion Training & Challenges to Design a Control Condition Antoine Lutz Refreshment Break Compassion vs. Empathic Distress & Memory Training as an Active Control Tania Singer & Olga Klimecki Afternoon Discussion Chairs: H. Engen & T.Singer Panel: E. L. Rosenberg, A. Lutz, C. Saron, O. Klimecki Afternoon Meditation with Barry Kerzin Personal Time

1:15 2:30 pm 2:30 3:30 pm 3:30 4:30 pm

4:30 4:45 pm 4:45 5:15 pm

5:15 6:15 pm

6:15 6:45 pm afterwards

8

Schedule

Saturday, July 23rd, 20118:00 9:00 am 9:00 9:30 am 9:30 10:00 am 10:00 11:00 am Breakfast at Studio Eliasson Morning Meditation with Joan Halifax Refreshment Break Mindfulness-Based Intervention as Integral to a Program of Compassion Training Ulrike Kesper-Grossman & Paul Grossman How to Train Compassion with the Modell of Non-Violent Communication Regula Langemann & Suna Yamaner Refreshment Break Morning Discussion Chairs: C. McCall & O. Klimecki Panel: U. Kesper-Grossman, P. Grossman, R. Langemann, & S. Yamaner Lunch Integration, Final Discussion, & Future Directions Moderated by Tania Singer Refreshment Break Afternoon Meditation with Joan Halifax Personal Time

11:00 12:00 pm

12:00 12:15 pm 12:15 1:15 pm

1:15 2:30 pm 2:30 4:00 pm 4:00 4:15 pm 4:15 4:45 pm 4:45 8:00 pm

Sunday, July 24th, 2011Departure Day9

Olafur Eliasson, Colour spectrum kaleidoscope, 2003 2003 Olafur Eliasson

Abstracts

July 21st, 2011, 10:00 11:00 am

Cultivating Compassion from a Buddhist PerspectiveMatthieu Ricard, Barry Kerzin, & Diego Hangartner Mind & Life Institute, Boulder, CO, USA Buddhist philosophy has been advocating that compassion is critical for human flourishing and that it can be trained through particular practices. We will explore different methodologies and their underlying philosophical foundations on the basis of which compassion can be developed. These methods vary depending on personal inclinations, and in consequence can, and have, to be generated differently. All of these methods, however, lead to generating compassion, which again is understood to be the source for relieving suffering. One approach involves cultivating a feeling of closeness towards everyone based on recognizing the kindness shown to us from everyone. From this feeling of closeness, we can more easily open our hearts to love and compassion for all others, including close ones, strangers, and those who make us uncomfortable. In another approach (from Mahayana Buddhism) we will cultivate the importance of others through the practice of tong.len (taking suffering and giving happiness) meditation. Wisdom eliminates the deepest level of suffering as an essential practice of compassion. Thus, we will also explore the practice of wisdom. Furthermore, clarifications of the meaning of altruistic love, compassion, and empathy will be presented according to the Buddhist perspective. In particular, we will attempt to distinguish between the emotional and cognitive aspects of compassion. The first one arises chiefly from bringing to mind the variety of suffering that afflicts sentient beings. The second one is related to investigating the various levels of suffering and their causes, down to ignorance -defined here as a misapprehension of reality-,which is considered to be the source of all other mental afflictions (hatred, attachment, lack of discernment, arrogance, envy, etc.). We will also present the reasoning and wisdom that allow expanding our limited, biased compassion, to all sentient beings. We will consider how these views could lead to various angles of research. In particular, we will reflect on the way how stand-alone empathy, disconnected from altruistic love and compassion, can lead to burn-out.

July 21st, 2011, 11:00 12:00 pm

Curriculum for Physicians and Nurses in Compassion and EthicsJoan Halifax Upaya Zen Center, Santa Fe, NM, USA The presentation will cover a summary of the curriculum of Upaya Institutes professional training program for clinicians working in the end-of-life care field. This program is based in a contemplative approach to caring for the dying and has a strong emphasis in compassion training. Upaya Institutes Professional Training Program in Contemplative End-of-Life11

Abstracts

Care teaches mindful and compassionate approaches to end-of-life care, clinician self-care (self-compassion), the development of moral character (compassion-based ethics), and contemplative interventions appropriate for clinicians and dying people. The training encompasses ethical, spiritual, psychological, and social aspects of care of the dying. In addition to teaching reflective practices and compassion-based ethics and communication strategies, it explores basic social neuroscience research that endeavors to give the contemplative approach an evidence-based perspective. The curriculum builds on contemplative practices that regulate attention and emotion, cultivate compassion, aid in the development of a meta-cognitive perspective, promote calm and resilience, reduce stress, and foster emotional balance. The contemplative content undergirds so-called spiritual dimensions, i.e. sense of meaning. It makes wise sense of meaning possible, by clarifying emotional states, developing pro-social states of mind, and fostering compassion and wisdom.

July 21st, 2011, 2:30 3:30 am

Compassion-Focused TherapyPaul Gilbert Mental Health Research Unit, University of Derby, UK There is a long history of using compassion to increase well-being but many of the traditional approaches assume that people are relatively psychologically stable. Not much exists in the way of research on individual differences and how they indicate and require different types of intervention. Over the last 20 years or so, we have been working with people who come from difficult or abusive backgrounds, where there was little compassion in their early life and who are often prone to shame and highly self-critical. These individuals find the process of working with compassion painful and are often resistant to such feelings. This is typical because feelings of receiving kindness or being kind to oneself reactivates attachment systems and with it unresolved traumas and difficulties. Hence, using a compassion focus that aims to build internal compassionate capacities for people who have quite serious mental health problems can be tricky. This has meant we have had to tailor and design a variety of compassion focused interventions specifically as a form of psychotherapy. My talk will briefly touch on the link between the roles and nature of the affiliative systems, the undermining