POSTURE AN · PDF file POSTURE ANALYSIS What is good posture? Posture is the position in which...

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Transcript of POSTURE AN · PDF file POSTURE ANALYSIS What is good posture? Posture is the position in which...

  • POSTURE ANALYSIS What is good posture?

    Posture is the position in which you hold your body upright against gravity while standing or sitting. Good posture involves training your body to stand, walk, sit in positions where the least strain is placed on supporting muscles and ligaments during movement or weight- bearing activities.

    Proper posture: • Keeps bones and joints in the correct alignment so that muscles are being used properly. • Helps decrease the abnormal wearing of joint surfaces that could result in arthritis. • Decreases the stress on the ligaments holding the joints of the spine together. • Prevents the spine from becoming fixed in abnormal positions. • Prevents fatigue because muscles are being used more efficiently, allowing the body to use less energy. • Prevents strain or overuse problems. • Prevents backache and muscular pain. • Contributes to a good appearance.

  • Understanding and practicing correct posture is extremely important in preventing musculoskeletal injuries. Remember.... .....you don't want to sit or stand in the same position throughout the day. .....posture needs to change frequently. If you have to sit or stand for prolonged periods of time, analyze your workstation or activity and reduce the strain on your body. .....to take frequent breaks and exercise.

    There are three natural curves in your spine. The neck (cervical spine) curves inward, the mid back (thoracic spine) curves outward, and the low back (lumbar spine) curves inward.

    Practicing proper posture

    low back (lumbar spine)

    neck (cervical spine)

    mid back (thoracic spine)

    sacrum

  • Your goal is to keep the three natural curves of your spine in their natural balanced alignment. Neutral spine is the position of greatest segmental balance and least amount of stress and pain to the joints, ligaments, and muscles. Standing or sitting in balance means you are working with gravity instead of against it. The muscles do not have to work hard to maintain balance; therefore the body feels less fatigued and can work more efficiently. When you slouch, you cause unnecessary strain, which can lead to backache, stiffness, and muscle fatigue.

  • Bad posture can most often be blamed on your feet. If your feet hyperpronate (arches collapse and ankles roll in), they do not properly support your body. Like a house on a bad foundation, your whole body is impacted. Your knees rotate inward, your back sways, making your stomach and buttocks stick out, your shoulders roll forward and your head is forward of your shoulders — the perfect definition of bad posture. You are off balance and it shows. You are stressing your body, and over time you are causing physical damage to your muscles, ligaments and joints.

  • HOW TO DO A POSTURE ANALYSIS

    1. Proper attire must be worn such that a number of bony landmarks are clearly visible on both the left and right side of the body. These landmarks include the... • acromioclavicular joint • anterior superior iliac spine • patella • tibial tuberosity • ankle joint

    NOTE: Stand with feet shoulder width apart for picture.

    ACROMIO- CLAVICULAR JOINT

    ANTERIOR SUPERIOR ILIAC SPINE

    PATELLA (KNEE CAP)

    TIBIAL TUBEROSITY

    ANKLE JOINT

  • 2. Stand in your natural comfortable posture with arms hanging relaxed at your sides and your feet shoulder width apart. Pose for a front view photograph. Repeat twice more for a left side photograph and a right side photograph.

  • 3. Insert your image into Smart Notebook software and using the line tool draw a vertical line down the centre of your body (belly button). Using the pen tool place a dot at each of the appropriate landmarks on both the left and right side of the body • acromion • anterior superior iliac spine • patella • tibial tuberosity • ankle joint

    PROPER LANDMARK LOCATIONS

  • 4. Using the line tool draw a horizontal line from the each of the A C joint, anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) and the patella, completely across the body to the right side of the image.

  • 5. Using the same line tool draw a second line from the same starting points through each of the opposite side landmarks.

  • 6. Pull the PROTRACTOR from the Measurement Tools icon on the top of the screen and use it to measure the three angles you have just created... • Acromion Angle • ASIS Angle • Patella Angle

    NOTE: The protractor will not measure any angles less than 3 degrees. Any angles less than this fall

    within the standards of good alignment.

  • 7. Using the text tool put this information on your image.

    3

    5

    3

  • CORRECT (FUNCTIONAL)

    ALIGNMENT

    INCORRECT (DYSFUNCTIONAL)

    ALIGNMENT

  • The Quadriceps Angle (Q-Angle) is formed by a line drawn from the anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) to the center of the patella (kneecap), and a line drawn through the center of the patella and the Tibial tuberosity.  

    Q-Angle Measurement

  • The angle formed by the intersection of these two lines should be less than 20 degrees in men and less than 25 degrees in women. The higher value for women is due to a wider pelvic stance. The Q-Angle best represents the proper alignment of the upper and lower leg. An abnormally high Q-Angle can cause stress on the entire kinetic chain of the lower extremity causing many conditions from low back pain to foot pain.

  • 8. Continue to use the line tool to connect lines to represent the Q Angle. Using the protractor measure the angle between your lines. Record this number on the image as shown. Repeat for the other leg.22

    Are your feet excessively pronated or supinated?

  • 9 Using your left facing side view compare your posture with the samples in this image. Which looks most like you? THINGS TO LOOK FOR.... • curvature of lower back • curvature of mid back • curvature of neck • position of head • can you see your hidden shoulder? • does your front shoulder stick forward or back?

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    10. The last step in this analysis is to check the vertical alignment of the key points. Do this by drawing a vertical blue dotted line from your AC joint straight down past your feet. How does it line up with your ASIS?

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    To finish your analysis list at least 3 positives regarding your posture and 3 negatives.

    3 POSITIVES • AC joint and ASIS points are very closely aligned. • Shoulder and hip alignment is good, being only separated by 3 degrees or less. • Q Angle of right leg is good (17)

    3 NEGATIVES • There is a general lean of the upper body to the right. • There is a 5 degree difference in Q angles • Q angle of left leg is above 20 degrees • 5 degree discrepancy in knee position is excessive.

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    3 POSITIVES • AC joint and ASIS points are very closely aligned. • Shoulder and hip alignment is good, being only separated by 3 degrees or less. • Q Angle of right leg is good (17)

    3 NEGATIVES • There is a general lean of the upper body to the right. • There is a 5 degree difference in Q angles • 5 degree discrepancy in knee position is excessive.

    COMPLETED POSTURE ANALYSIS FOR.. STEPHANIE STRAITBACK

    SIDE COMPARISON My posture matches best with the correct posture profile. My head is slightly forward.