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Issue 78. Sample issue.

Transcript of Photo Professional Magazine

  • A NIGHT IN THE CELLS WITH SUE FOLL

    HOW TO KEEP YOUR BLOG INTERESTING

    PORTRAIT RETOUCHING SOFTWARE RATED

    NEW GEAR: FULL LAUNCH DETAILS OF THE NEW NIKON D7100

    PERFECT PRINTS MADE EASYVital kit to get colour confident

    THE ULTIMATE PHOTO FINISH13 stylish ways to show your shots

    Get started s Define your style s Light bridal portraits s Master post-production

    ISSUE 78 4.50 www.photopromagazine.com

    Driving ambitionAstonishing automotive art by CGI guru Carl Lyttle

    PRO PORTFOLIO

    Promote your skills tobeat weekend warriors

    WEDDINGSITS ALLABOUT YOU

    SPECIAL ISSUE

    AN AMAZING STEALTHY STABILISER WORTH 400!WIN

    PP04_001 (COVER)rpljc.indd 1 25/2/13 14:10:54

  • 004 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 78

    CONTENTSISSUE 78

    Business MattersPro Academy Gear

    Regulars

    032 LIGHTING MASTERCLASSWEDDING Gordon McGowan, author of this months cover image, shares some of his lighting techniques to help your wedding images stand out.

    042 POST-PRODUCTION SKILLSWEDDING Find out how photographer Podge Kelly uses post-production techniques to off er clients an extra service and boost his bottom line.

    052 LIGHT BRIDAL PORTRAITSWEDDING All wedding photographers need to shoot good bridal portraits, but great shots will get more revenue. Peter Prior off ers sound advice to maximise sales potential when times against you.

    087 GET COLOUR CONFIDENT WEDDING Colour management is crucial for editing and outputting your images. We test gadgets from 100 to over 1000 that will save time, money and deliver great results.

    094 PORTRAIT RETOUCHINGWEDDING We test two soft ware packages that promise brilliant portrait retouching with a few mouse clicks. Which one is worth its weight in gold?

    098 PRESENTATION GUIDE There are many more ways to present images than a book or album. Here are 13 alternative options you can market to your clients.

    061 BUSINESS MATTERSDont miss these essential nuggets of advice from our experts that will help you run your business better.

    064 FANCY A CAREER CHANGE?WEDDING Sam Gibson left a successful media career to become a wedding photographer. Has it worked?

    068 CHOOSE YOUR STYLEWEDDING Theres a host of wedding styles to adopt, but which one is best for you and, crucially, your clients?

    076 PROMOTE YOUR SKILLSWEDDING Your professional skills and experience are valuable assets. Heres how to market them to your clients.

    006 INBOX Spec details on Nikons new sharp-shooting D7100, the latest launches from Courtenay and Sigma, plus your chance to win a 400 photo/video support.

    018 PORTFOLIO: CARL LYTTLEWitness Carls stunning automotive art that sees cameras and computers work in perfect harmony.

    018

    024

    Subscriptions & back issues:

    WEDDING Essential tips and tricks to help you shoot bridal portraits that will sell.

    052

    024 PROJECT: SUE FOLLEvent photography with a diff erence as Sue endures a night in the cells with a series of dedicated fi lm goers. No popcorn allowed!

    PP04_004-005 (CONTENTS)RPljchb.indd 4 25/2/13 14:45:44

  • ISSUE 78 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 005

    Photo Professional is published on the first Thursday of every month by Bright Publishing Ltd, Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge, CB22 3HJ.

    No part of this magazine can be used without prior written permission of Bright Publishing Ltd. Photo Professional is a registered trademark of Bright Publishing Ltd. The advertisements published in Photo Professional that have been written, designed or produced by employees of Bright Publishing Ltd remain the copyright of Bright Publishing Ltd and may not be reproduced without the written consent of the publisher. The content of this publication does not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.

    Cant find a copy? Finding your nearest Photo Professional magazine stockist couldnt be easier. Simply contact: COMAG, Tavistock Road, West Drayton, Middlesex, UB7 7QE Alternatively call 01895 433600.

    When you have fi nished with this magazine, please recycle it

    Bright House, 82 High Street, Sawston, Cambridge CB22 3HJTelephone 01223 499450 enquiries@bright-publishing.comwww.photopromagazine.com

    editorialEditorTerry Hope 01959 563007terryhope@bright-publishing.com

    Technical WriterIan Fyfe 01223 499456ianfyfe@bright-publishing.com

    Sub EditorsLisa Clatworthy 01223 499450Hannah Bealey 01223 499450

    Editorial DirectorRoger Payne 01223 499460rogerpayne@bright-publishing.com

    Design Director Dean Usher

    Design & Production Manager Grant Gillard

    advertisingSales DirectorMatt Snow 01223 499453mattsnow@bright-publishing.com

    Key Accounts Maria Francis 01223 499457 mariafrancis@bright-publishing.com

    Mike Elliott 01223 499458mikeelliott@bright-publishing.com

    Business Development DirectorDave Stone 01223 499462davestone@bright-publishing.com

    All advertising copy to: pproads@bright-publishing.com

    publishingPublishing Directors Andy Brogden & Matt Pluck

    Head of Circulation Chris Haslum

    068 087

    Cover image Gordon McGowan

    www.photopromagazine.com, call 01371 851876 or see p82 for our special offer

    PP04_004-005 (CONTENTS)RPljchb.indd 5 25/2/13 14:46:03

  • PORTFOLIO | CARL LYTTLE

    018 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 78018 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 78

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  • PORTFOLIO | CARL LYTTLE

    ISSUE 78 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 019ISSUE 78 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 019

    PP04_018-023 (PORTFOLIO)hbljc.indd 19 25/2/13 12:18:45

  • 032 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL ISSUE 78

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  • ISSUE 78 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 033

    PRO ACADEMY

    L I G H T I N G M A S T E R C L A S S

    While many couples these days are opting for a reportage approach on their big day there is still strong demand for the classic wedding images

    that lighting maestro Gordon McGowan deliversWORDS CHRISTIAN HOUGH PICTURES GORDON McGOWAN

    LIGHTINGCLASSIC WEDDING

    ISSUE 78 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 033

    egendary social photographer Gordon McGowans first encounter with the craft that hes gone on to master was at

    the age of nine, while in hospital for an ear operation. During his stay he was given a Russian Victor camera from Woolworths by his father, and equipped with this 15 gift he began taking photographs of the hospital staff. To this day he recalls the fantastic buzz he received from the reaction of

    the nursing staff when he returned to the hospital to hand out the prints hed had made.

    This experience inspired Gordon, who began photographing landscapes and family members on a regular basis. Ultimately it led to him shooting his first wedding for a work colleague in the early eighties, a commission that effectively kick-started his professional career. Since that point Gordons work has gone from strength to strength and his reputation has soared.

    His client base has broadened and hes also become a regular fixture on the training circuit, earning huge respect from his peers and the wider industry. Testament to the high technical level that he has achieved in his work, Gordons achievements include the accolade of Fellowship in Wedding Photography from the Royal Photographic Society and numerous awards from the professional industry bodies.

    L

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  • ISSUE 78 PHOTO PROFESSIONAL 061

    hotographers who havent yet entered the big wide world of weddings might be put off by the horror stories.

    A quick glance through Google reveals tales of photographers in big spats with newly-weds. And given the widespread bridezilla stereotype, its easy to blame everything on the client, but the truth is a lot of disputes could be avoided.

    The first issue to consider with wedding photography is a legally binding contract. This contract exists whether or not you write it down. But if you do not issue a written contract, it can be difficult for you and the clients to be clear about both your expectations, what shots you must bag and when your payment is due.

    From time to time I host legal seminars for photographers and am often surprised at how many professionals accept jobs without a contract. With weddings often seen as the most important day in two peoples lives, the stakes are high so a proper contract is essential.

    While reading some online wedding complaints I saw a comment that made me stop and think. An unhappy photographer said hed done everything expected of him, but the clients were unhappy and refusing to pay. All of which, perhaps, shows how important it is to make the clients happy.

    From a legal point of view prevention is better than cure, so make sure youre clear what the clients really want. When clients book they can be frighteningly vague about this. Meet with them early on to find out what will make them a truly happy couple.

    I have come across instances of couples hiring a photographer to take informal candid shots with no formal group shots. Yet after the wedding the couples family have been upset to learn that theres no posed shot of the bride with her mum, the groom with his siblings, etc. Its tempting to say the client didnt ask for these pictures in the first place, so why should they get them? However, youll still be dealing with an unhappy couple, so be thorough in your preparation, think on your feet during the day and keep checking whats required. Its the only sure-fire way to avoid complaints, so ask the difficult questions and be specific.

    If someone genuinely doesnt wa