Partnerships and the Future of Agriculture Technology

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Presentation delivered by Dr. Robert T. Fraley (Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer, Monsanto, USA) at Borlaug Summit on Wheat for Food Security. March 25 - 28, 2014, Ciudad Obregon, Mexico. http://www.borlaug100.org

Transcript of Partnerships and the Future of Agriculture Technology

  • Partnerships and the Future of Agriculture Technology Dr. Robert T. Fraley Executive Vice President and Chief Technology Officer Monsanto Company 2013 World Food Prize Laureate @RobbFraley
  • 2 ENABLE production of nutritious, affordable food
  • 3 Norman Borlaug Devoted His Life to Improving the Most Important Global Staple Crop: Wheat In 1944, Dr. Borlaug participated in the Rockefeller Foundation's pioneering technical assistance program in Mexico, where he was a research scientist in charge of wheat improvement. For the next sixteen years, he worked to solve a series of wheat production problems that were limiting wheat cultivation in Mexico and to help train a whole generation of young Mexican scientists. The work in Mexico not only had a profound impact on Dr. Borlaug's life and philosophy of agriculture research and development, but also on agricultural production, first in Mexico and later in many parts of the world. It was on the research stations and farmers' fields of Mexico that Dr. Borlaug developed successive generations of wheat varieties with broad and stable disease resistance, broad adaptation to growing conditions across many degrees of latitude, and with exceedingly high yield potential. These new wheat varieties and improved crop management practices transformed agricultural production in Mexico during the 1940's and 1950's and later in Asia and Latin America, sparking what today is known as the "Green Revolution. It is said that Dr. Borlaug has "saved more lives than any other person who has ever lived." Source: WorldFood Prize
  • 4 Why is Increasing Agriculture Production Needed? 1990 20121980 2050TODAY 4.4 B 7.1B 9.6B+ 1ACRE perpersonin 1961 lessthan 1/3ACREperpersonin 2050 DIETARYPERCENTAGEOFMEAT 9% in 1965 14% in 2030 CHANGING economies & diets CHANGING climate RISING population DECLINING arable land Source:http://esa.un.org/unpd/wpp/ Source:USThirdNationalClimateAssessment(2013) Source:TheWorldBank,FoodandAgricultureOrganizationoftheUnited Nations(FAO-STAT),MonsantoInternalCalculations Source:UNFAOFoodBalanceSheet,WorldHealthOrganizationGlobal andregionalfoodconsumptionpatternsandtrends
  • 5 Source: Ray DK, Mueller ND, West PC, Foley JA (2013) Yield Trends Are Insufficient to Double Global Crop Production by 2050. PLoS ONE 8(6): e66428. Yield(tons/ha/yr) Global Grain Demand is Expected to Double by 2050 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 2013 2050RISING CHANGING
  • 6 Source: US Third National Climate Assessment (2013) CHANGING Planting Zone Shifts Staple Crops are Impacted by Climate Change Advances in Technology Can Help Mitigate the Effects Changes In Weed Pressure Insect Range Expansion Crop Disease Increases Impacts on Water Availability Increase in Extreme Weather
  • 7 McKinsey Global Institute has Identified Resource Productivity Improvements that would Help Meet the Futures Needs 5 of the top 15 improvements are directly related to agriculture. 2. Increasing yields on large-scale farms 3. Reducing food waste 7. Increasing yields on smallholder farms 10. Reducing land degradation 13. Improving irrigation techniques Source: McKinsey , 2011; Resource Revolution: Meeting the worlds energy, materials, food, and water needs. Achieving resource productivity improvements would off-set the increase in land demand and much of the increase in water demand.
  • 8 Global rates of yield gain (1961-2011), based on data available from FAOSTAT Rate Needed to Double Yields by 2050 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 Potatoes Sorghum Sugar cane Cassava Millet Pulses Sweet Potatoes Wheat Rice Soybeans Maize Annual Rate of Yield Gain (%) Impact of Reducing Food Wastage by 30% Rates of Yield Increases for Staple Crops Vary with Plant Biology Factors & Level of Technology Investment
  • 9 Adoption of Technology Innovation Leads to Increases in Crop Yields Improved germplasm breeding Better farm equipment Optimized nutrient (NPK) usage Better water management Crop protection products Adoption of biotechnology traits Source: USDA NASS KEY DRIVERS United States Maize average yields by country MT/HA 10.0 India2.3 Mexico 3.2 Brazil 4.0 China5.4 Argentina6.7 France9.1 Source: USDA PSD 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 MetricTonsperHectare(MT/HA) Historical Yield Trends for Maize (US)
  • 10 Field to Market (2012 V2). Environmental and Socioeconomic Indicators for Measuring Outcomes of On-Farm Agricultural Production in the United States: Second Report, (Version 2), December 2012. Available at: www.fieldtomarket.org. Over the Past 30 Years, Corn Production has Increased 64%, with Improved Resource Efficiency
  • 11 Support Remains High For Technology Investment In Wheat The Wheat Value Chain recognizes the need for increased investment in technology for wheat. Farmers continue the call for investment in new technology for wheat Nine wheat-related associations from Australia, Canada and the U.S. support commercialization of biotech wheat Millers, bakers and food companies are increasingly supportive of technology in wheat The Wheat InnovationAlliance is working to achieve acceptance for wheat enhanced by biotechnology Herbicide-Tolerant EventControl
  • 12 Combinations of Technologies Deliver Solutions for Farmers COMBINED solutions BIOLOGICALSBIOTECHNOLOGY FARM MANAGEMENT SOLUTIONS CROP PROTECTION BREEDING WEMULTIPLYTHEBENEFITSOF INNOVATION when we combine these capabilities to solve problems and increase efficiency
  • 13 >40 million marker-trait associations enables detailed understanding of the plants genome which allows development of better crop plants Leveraging global seed resources results in annual crop yield gains Plant Breeding Is Experiencing A Technical Revolution That Will Drive Yield Improvements
  • 14 Sources: ISAAA, Biotechnology Industry Organization, USDA Foreign Agricultural Service, Africxa Biosafety Network of Expertise. Farmers Choose Biotechnology to Help Ensure Their Success >400 Million acres of GM crops were planted in 2012. 17 Million farmers in nearly 30 countries choose biotech. Most of them are small-holder farmers.
  • 15Sources: Brookes, G. and Barfoot, P. GM Crops Food 3, 129-37 (2012); Brookes, G. and Barfoot, P. GM Crops Food 3, 1-8 (2012); Edgerton, M. D. et al. Nat. Biotech. 30, 493496 (2012); National Research Council. The Impact of Genetically Engineered Crops on Farm Sustainability in the United States (National Academies Press, Washington; 2010); Folcher, L. et al. Agron. Sustain. Dev. 30, 711719 (2010); Subramanian, A. & Qaim, M. WorldDev. 37, 256267 (2009) Crop Biotechnology is Safe, and Delivers Yield, Economic, and Environmental Benefits There is no substantiated case of any adverse impact on human health, animal health or environmental health, and I would be confident in saying that there is no more risk in eating GMO food than eating conventionally farmed food. Anne Glover, Chief Scientific Advisor European Commission July 24, 2012 Fewer Pesticides Lower Greenhouse Gas Emissions Increased Yields Improved Soil Quality
  • 16Sources: Brookes, G. and Barfoot, P. GM Crops Food 3, 129-37 (2012); Brookes, G. and Barfoot, P. GM Crops Food 3, 1-8 (2012); Edgerton, M. D. et al. Nat. Biotech. 30, 493496 (2012); National Research Council. The Impact of Genetically Engineered Crops on Farm Sustainability in the United States (National Academies Press, Washington; 2010); Folcher, L. et al. Agron. Sustain. Dev. 30, 711719 (2010); Subramanian, A. & Qaim, M. WorldDev. 37, 256267 (2009) Crop Biotechnology is Safe, and Delivers Yield, Economic, and Environmental Benefits There is no substantiated case of any adverse impact on human health, animal health or environmental health, and I would be confident in saying that there is no more risk in eating GMO food than eating conventionally farmed food. Anne Glover, Chief Scientific Advisor European Commission July 24, 2012 @RobbFraley [email protected]
  • 17 AG BIOTECHNOLOGY Delivers Insect Control, Weed Control, and Stress Tolerance ADVANCED BREEDING Delivers Pest Control, Stress Tolerance, and Disease Control DATA SCIENCE Designed to Optimize Farm Management Practices AG BIOLOGICALS Designed to Deliver Weed Management, Insect Management, Plant Health and Bee Health Going Beyond Biotech & Breeding: New Platforms Designed to Deliver Innovations Needed to Meet Demand The Next Steps In Evolution Of Technologies For Solving Farmers Challenges Requires a Systems Approach
  • 18 Plant Population Soil Insecticides HarvestPlanning Soil Nematicides Seed Treatment Fungicide Application In-Furrow Soil Insecticides Variety/Hybrid Selection In-Field Variety/Hybrid Selection Tillage Level Starter Fertilizer Foliar Disease Control Refuge Options Primary Tillage Program Herbicide Application Irrigation Application In-Season Crop Rotation Fertility Program