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Palma de Mallorca Airport 2010 Environmental Management Report

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Palma de Mallorca Airport 2010 Environmental Management Report
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3 Introduction 4 Airport description 7 Environmental Management System (EMS) 7 Aena’s environmental and energy policy 9 Description of environmental management system 11 Environmental aspects 18 2010 environmental management program: goals and objectives 19 Audits and non-conformities 21 Environmental performance – Operational control 21 Control of consumption 30 Waste management 38 Control of discharges 39 Monitoring of air quality 41 Monitoring of acoustic impact 46 Control of hazardous material storage 46 Environmental monitoring of companies 51 Training and awareness 53 Our natural setting 55 Collaborative projects 56 Community relations 57 Environmental management award
Palma de Mallorca Airport
2010 Environmental Management Report
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Introduction
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Ever since 2002, when the Palma de Mallorca Airport implemented its UNE-EN ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Management System, our efforts have focused on developing and implementing the commitments acquired as part of the environmental principles present in Aena’s environmental policy, as well as on ensuring we are in compliance with all applicable legal requirements.
Proof of this commitment to Aena’s environmental excellence is the periodic review and update of its environmental policy, the last version of which, dated June 2010, associated energy efficiency principles with its environmental principles.
In an effort to continue fostering the awareness and involvement of everyone associated with the airport, actions were carried out in 2010 such as the creation of an external environmental committee and the organization of the third
annual Environment Day and the second annual Occupational Risk Prevention day.
All of these activities were carried alongside those that have a direct effect on protecting the environment or minimizing impacts, such as cutting down on the amount of natural resources consumed, reducing discharges and waste, increasing the amount of waste that is recycled and monitoring noise levels.
This 2010 environmental management report for the Palma de Mallorca Airport has the dual purpose of disseminating the activities and the goals accomplished in this period and of raising awareness in and encouraging people, companies and agencies to continue contributing to this common project. We hope you enjoy it.
Nemesio Suárez González Director of the Palma de Mallorca Airport
North side of terminal building
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The Palma de Mallorca Airport is marking its 50th anni- versary since it was opened to commercial air traffic. It has grown exponentially ever since, becoming one of the most important airports in the Mediterranean, the leading airport in terms of tourist traffic and Spain’s third busiest in passenger volume (21,117,417 passengers in 2010), behind only Madrid and Barcelona.
Located on the Palma bay at the southwest of the island, and only 8 kilometers away from the city of Palma, the airport is a top category airport: it has two runways for
takeoff and landings and is open round the clock (24 h a day all year long).
Although summer always sees the most activity, the air- port is still striving to become less seasonal. Domestica- lly, the most important routes are to and from Barcelo- na and Madrid-Barajas, and internationally, Dusseldorf and Manchester. In terms of vacation and residential tourism, Germany contributes the most passengers to this airport, followed by Spain and the United King- dom.
Airport description
PASSENGERS 26,000,000
24,000,000
22,000,000
20,000,000
18,000,000
16,000,000
14,000,000
12,000,000
10,000,000
8,000,000
6,000,000
4,000,000
2,000,000
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
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AIRCRAFT MOVEMENTS
The Palma de Mallorca Airport has one terminal building that is linked to four boarding modules: A, B, C (with its hub) and D, a general aviation terminal and a cargo terminal, all of which offer patrons and passengers the chance to enjoy facilities featuring the amenities neces- sary to make their stay pleasant, comfortable and safe.
Through its hub operations, the Palma de Mallorca Air- port has become a distribution center for flights to and from Germany, Switzerland and Amsterdam, with con- nections to domestic and Portuguese airports.
240,000
220,000
200,000
180,000
160,000
140,000
120,000
100,000
80,000
60,000
40,000
20,000
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
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30,000,000
25,000,000
20,000,000
15,000,000
10,000,000
5,000,000
2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
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Aena’s environmental and energy policy
On 8 June 2010, the President and General Manager approved an update to Aena’s environmental policy which introduced aspects involving continuous im- provement and energy efficiency at Aena facilities. With it, Aena’s policy came to be called “Aena’s Envi- ronmental and Energy Policy”.
All Aena personnel and its Human Resources Depart- ment, which provides new employees with a copy, were informed of the publication on the intranet of Aena’s new Environmental and Energy Policy. Also informed were contractors and concessionaires that work within the airport complex.
Environmental and energy commitment
Aena, Spain’s airport and air navigation authority, as a leader in providing safe, quality and efficient air trans- portation services through its airports and air naviga- tion system, is cognizant of its commitment to society to protect the environment and of its role in contributing to the sustainability of air travel.
Consistent with this responsibility, one of Aena’s goals is excellence in the provision of the services assigned to it. This requires, as part of the Spanish Strategy on Sustainable Development, the application of measures that allow for the sustainable development of air travel by striking a balance between its costs and its social, environmental and economic benefits in order to yield a positive result for our society. .
En esta línea, el compromiso de Aena con el me- dioambiente se ha venido desarrollando de forma constante y continua, a través de la definición de un conjunto de programas y actuaciones, así como de un progresivo incremento en la asignación de recur- sos para el logro de sus objetivos medioambientales. Todo ello se articula en base a una Política Medioam- biental y Energética, en continua revisión, que ha ca- lado con fuerza en la conciencia colectiva de nuestra organización.
Asimismo, la variable ambiental es incorporada en todas las etapas de nuestra actividad: planificación, proyecto, construcción y prestación del servicio, per- mitiendo, a través de los oportunos indicadores, la definición de medidas de protección, compensación y corrección que minimicen los impactos que poten- cialmente se asocian a la actividad aeroportuaria, de navegación aérea y de desarrollo de infraestructuras,
Ornamental fountains at the airport
Along these lines, Aena’s commitment to the environ- ment has been a constant and ongoing process, one that has involved defining a set of programs and ac- tions, as well as a gradual increase in the resources al- lotted for achieving its environmental commitments, all hinged around a constantly updated Environmen- tal and Energy Policy that has taken root in our or- ganization’s collective consciousness.
The environmental variable is likewise present in every aspect of our daily activities: planning, projects, con- struction and provision of services. By using suitable indicators, we can define preventive, protective, com- pensatory and corrective measures to minimize any potential impact from airport activities, air navigation and infrastructure development, thus ensuring higher levels of environmental quality, economic progress and the preservation of our natural values.
In keeping with this environmental commitment, the implementation of new environmental management systems is being promoted at airport and air naviga- tion centers. These systems are based on internation- ally recognized norms that allow for the awarding of environmental certifications.
In particular, as part of our commitments under the Kyoto Protocol, we are striving to reduce greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change by making the most of our energy resources and by turn- ing toward the progressive use of renewable energies as permitted by operational requirements. This has all led Aena to establish a commitment for environmental excellence to meet the social and en- vironmental demands that will ensure the sustainable development or air transportation in keeping with the following principles:
Environmental and energy principles
To respect and protect the environment as a central tenet in the management of those activities entrusted to Aena in the area of airports and air navigation, as well as in the development of aviation infrastructure and of commercial spaces and services.
To make air travel compatible with preserving the envi- ronment such that today’s actions do not compromise the quality of life of future generations, thus promoting sustainable development.
To establish procedures for learning of and updating the legal, environmental and energy requirements applica- ble to Aena’s activities and its legal commitments and for complying with them.
To implement an Environmental Management System at each center that is compatible with this environmental policy, and which allows for the periodic definition of environmental goals and objectives, as well as for the systematic monitoring and evaluation of its level of com- pliance so as to assure constant improvement and the prevention of contamination.
To have available the information and resources neces- sary to propose and achieve constant improvement ob- jectives involving energy efficiency as a cornerstone for reducing CO2 emissions, as part of Aena’s strategy for sustainable development.
To promote actions intended to minimize sound lev- els and that allow for preserving the quality of life in neighborhoods around the airport.
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To use the technical and economic means available to prevent the air pollution that may be associated with Aena’s activities, while minimizing chemical emissions and establishing suitable testing, monitoring and cor- rective mechanisms.
To promote the reuse, recycling and management of waste in a way that is environmentally friendly.
To streamline the consumption of energy and natural resources through energy efficiency and the gradual utilization of renewable energies.
To behave transparently with the public agencies, in- stitutions and communities involved in Aena’s activity and to cooperate closely with them so as to prevent any potential environmental impact that may result from those activities associated with air transporta- tion.
To inform all of Aena’s employees, contractors and concessionaires of its Environmental Policy and to make it available to our clients and to the rest of so- ciety.
To promote awareness in our staff through training programs on the importance of the correct conduct of their activities, encouraging their participation to achieve our goals.
To periodically revise the Environmental Policy to meet the organization’s new objectives, adapting it to new needs as they arise.
Description of the Environmental Management System (EMS)
The Palma de Mallorca Airport has a UNE-EN ISO 14001:2004 Environmental Management System (EMS) in place and has been environmentally certified by AENOR since 2002.
The main goal of the EMS at the Palma de Mallorca Air- port is to ensure compliance with Aena’s environmen- tal and energy policy and with current environmental laws. The EMS also commits the airport to continuous improvement and preventing pollution.
The goal, thus, is to minimize the environmental impact of the airport’s activity on its surroundings. The EMS consists primarily of the following documenta- tion:
Aena’s environmental and energy policy.
EMS documentation (manual, general and specific procedures, technical instructions and records).
Environmental management program.
SGA-EC Bylaws of the Environmental Committee
GENERAl PROCEDuRES
SGA-PG-02 Development of environmental management program
SGA-PG-03 Identifying and accessing legal environmental and other requirements
SGA-PG-04 Personnel training and awareness
SGA-PG-05 Environmental reporting
SGA-PG-07 Identifying and responding to potential accidents and emergency situations
SGA-PG-08 Control of non-conformities, corrective and preventive actions
SGA-PG-09 Conducting internal audits of the environmental management system
SGA-PG-10 Environmental monitoring of companies
TECHNICAl INSTRuCTIONS
SGA-PG-07/IT-02 Plan for preventing Legionnaire’s disease
SGA-PG-10/IT-01 Monitoring of companies: responsibilities of case managers and concessionaires
SGM-PG-10/IT-02 Guidelines for preparing an environmental monitoring plan
SGM-PG-10/IT-03 Environmental performance standards: environmental clauses and requirements
SGM-PG-10/IT-04 Controlling aviation noise in and around the airport
SGA-EC/IT-01 Make-up of the Environmental Committee
SPECIFIC PROCEDuRES
SGA-PE-05 Control of discharges
EMS DOCUMENTATION
Environmental aspects
An environmental aspect is defined as any element of an organization’s activities, products or services that can interact with the environment.
Environmental aspects can be direct when they result from normal activities, or potential when they are as- sociated with emergency or risk situations.
Once identified, they are evaluated to determine the risks and establish actions intended to minimize said risks.
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2008 2009 2010
WASTE
Pick-up of unsorted urban waste General airport activities NS NS NS
Paper and cardboard Administrative and commercial activities, leftover press NS NS NS
Light-duty packaging Restaurants, catering, etc. NS NS NS
Glass containers Restaurants, catering, etc. NS NS NS
Construction waste Minor construction work NS NS NS
Bulky glass Minor construction work and maintenance NS NS NS
Bulky paper and cardboard Minor construction work, general airport activities _ NS NS
Scrap metal Minor construction work, general airport activities _ NS NS
Bulky plastic Minor construction work, general airport activities _ NS NS
Untreated wood Minor construction work, general airport activities _ NS NS
Treated wood Minor construction work, general airport activities _ NS NS
Bulky waste Minor construction work, general airport activities NS NS NS
Sludge from wastewater treatment Maintenance of collecting tanks and septic tanks NS NS NS
Gardening and other plant waste Landscaping NS NS NS
Electrical and electronic waste Equipment maintenance NS NS NS
Used mineral or synthetic oil Equipment maintenance S S NS
Oily water FFS drills S S NS
Degraded anti-freeze Equipment maintenance S S S
Used Ni-Cd batteries Equipment maintenance S NS S
Used lead batteries Equipment maintenance S NS S
Aqueous cleaning fluids Equipment maintenance S S S
Used solvents Equipment and facility maintenance S S S
Oil-freon emulsions Equipment and facility maintenance S S S
Aerosol packaging and containers Equipment and facility maintenance S S NS
Contaminated empty containers Equipment and facility maintenance S S NS
Used oil and fuel filters Equipment maintenance S NS S
Sludge from oil separators Oil separator maintenance S NS S
* S: Significant * NS: Not Significant
Environmental Management System (EMS)
DIRECT ENVIRONMENTAl ASPECTS
2008 2009 2010
Laboratory reactants Facility maintenance S NS NS
Hydrocarbon waste Spill clean-up (aspiration) S NS NS
Degraded hydrocarbons
Waste contaminated with cutting fluid Equipment and facility maintenance S NS NS
Contaminated absorbent sand Spill clean-up S NS S
Contaminated rags Equipment and facility maintenance S S S
Fluorescent tubes and disused bulbs containing mercury and sodium
Facility maintenance NS S NS
Paint residue Facility maintenance S NS S
Vehicles at end of useful life Vehicles at end of useful life NS S S
Tires Vehicle maintenance S NS NS
Photographic components: disused film, photographs and X-rays
Lost and found / Administrative activities NS NS NS
Expired medicines Medical services S NS NS
Toner and other ink waste Administrative activities NS NS NS
Used printer ribbons Check-in counters S NS NS
Medical waste Medical services
CONSuMPTION OF RESOuRCES
Potable water usage
Ornamental fountains S S S
Irrigation S S S
Electricity usage Lighting, climate control, general facility and movement area operations
S NS NS
ENVIRONMENTAl ASPECT GENERATING ACTIVITY ASSESSMENT
2008 2009 2010
WASTE
Pick-up of unsorted urban waste General airport activities NS NS NS
Paper and cardboard Administrative and commercial activities, leftover press NS NS NS
Light-duty packaging Restaurants, catering, etc. NS NS NS
Glass containers Restaurants, catering, etc. NS NS NS
Construction waste Minor construction work NS NS NS
Bulky glass Minor construction work and maintenance NS NS NS
Bulky paper and cardboard Minor construction work, general airport activities NS NS NS
Scrap metal Minor construction work, general airport activities NS NS NS
Bulky plastic Minor construction work, general airport activities NS NS NS
Untreated wood Minor construction work, general airport activities NS NS NS
Treated wood Minor construction work, general airport activities NS NS NS
Bulky waste Minor construction work, general airport activities NS NS NS
Sludge from wastewater treatment Maintenance of collecting tanks and septic tanks NS NS S
Gardening and other plant waste Landscaping NS NS NS
Electrical and electronic waste Equipment maintenance NS NS NS
Used mineral or synthetic oil Equipment maintenance S NS S
Oily water FFS drills S NS S
Degraded anti-freeze Equipment maintenance S S S
Used Ni-Cd batteries Equipment maintenance NS S S
Used lead batteries Equipment maintenance NS S S
Aqueous cleaning fluids Equipment maintenance S S S
Used solvents Equipment and facility maintenance S S S
Oil-freon emulsions Equipment and facility maintenance S S S
Aerosol packaging and containers Equipment and facility maintenance S NS S
Contaminated empty containers Equipment and facility maintenance S NS S
Used oil and fuel filters Equipment maintenance NS S S
Sludge from oil separators Oil separator maintenance NS S NS
Used pencil batteries Equipment maintenance S NS S
* S: Significant * NS: Not Significant
Environmental Management System (EMS)
ENVIRONMENTAl ASPECT GENERATING ACTIVITY ASSESSMENT
2008 2009 2010
Laboratory reactants Facility maintenance NS NS NS
Hydrocarbon waste " Spill clean-up (aspiration) NS NS NS
Degraded hydrocarbons” NS NS S NS
Waste contaminated with cutting fluid Equipment and facility maintenance NS NS NS
Contaminated absorbent sand Spill clean-up NS S S
Contaminated rags Equipment and facility maintenance S S S
Fluorescent tubes and disused bulbs containing mercury and sodium
Facility maintenance S NS S
Disused halogen bulbs Facility maintenance - - S
Paint residue Facility maintenance NS S S
Vehicles at end of useful life Vehicles at end of useful life S S S
Tires Vehicle maintenance NS NS S
Photographic components: disused film, photographs and X-rays
Lost and found / Administrative activities NS NS NS
Expired medicines Medical services NS NS NS
Toner and other ink waste Administrative activities NS NS NS
Used printer ribbons Check-in counters NS NS NS
Group III bio-medical waste Medical services NS NS S
Group II bio-medical waste Medical services NS NS NS
Used vegetable oil Aena office kitchens NS NS NS
Disused ion fire detectors Facility maintenance S S NS
Asbestos waste Minor construction work - - NS
CONSuMPTION OF RESOuRCES
Potable water usage
Ornamental fountains S S S
Irrigation S S S
* S: Significant * NS: Not Significant
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2008 2009 2010
CONSuMPTION OF RESOuRCES
Electricity usage Lighting, climate control, general operation of facilities and movement area
NS NS S
Solar energy Hot water supply and heat ring NS NS NS
Usage of air propane Heating NS NS S
Usage of petroleum-based fuels Emergency generator operations NS NS S
Vehicle operations S S S
Usage of ecological paper Administrative activities NS NS NS
Usage of recycled paper Administrative activities NS NS NS
EMISSIONS
No. 3 HVAC boiler north NS NS NS
No. 3 HVAC boiler south NS NS NS
Potable water heater NS NS NS
No. 3 UPS CE II S S S
No. 4 UPS CE II S S S
No. 1 emergency generator CE II S S S
No. 2 emergency generator CE II S S S
No. 3 emergency generator CE II S S S
Other emergency generators S S S
Vehicles S S S
Inert particle emissions Construction NS NS NS
DISCHARGES
Discharges to city sewer system Lavatories, restaurants, cleaning S S S
Discharges to no. 6 septic tank (Can Reviu) Lavatories NS NS NS
Discharges to no. 7 septic tank (Asociación Amigos de los Molinos)
Lavatories NS NS NS
* S: Significant * NS: Not Significant
Environmental Management System (EMS)
RISK IMPACT 2008 2009 2010
Fire in facilities or onboard aircraft Waste, emissions, spills, contamination of soil and aquifers
NS NS NS
Spill and fire of liquid fuels in stationary or mobile structures
Waste, emissions, spills, contamination of soil and aquifers
NS NS NS
Waste, emissions, spills, contamination of soil and aquifers
NS NS NS
Low-volume fuel spills Waste, emissions, spills, contamination of soil and aquifers
NS NS NS
Accidental spills of hazardous materials or waste Waste, emissions, spills, contamination of soil and aquifers
S S S
Leaks from flammable gas tanks or pipes Waste, water consumption, emissions, Spills, contamination of soil and aquifers
NS NS NS
Waste, spills, contamination of soil and aquifers
NS NS NS
Waste, spills, contamination of soil and aquifers
NS NS NS
Breakdown of wastewater pumps Waste, spills, contamination of soil and aquifers
NS NS NS
Freon leak due to rupture or A/C unit malfunction Emissions S S S
Legionella contamination Emissions NS NS NS
Discharge to septic tank (in front of Aena I) In case of emergency only (“catastrophic” Failure of municipal sewage network)
NS NS NS
Spill from fault in existing hydrocarbon separators Waste, spills, contamination of soil and aquifers NS NS NS
* S: Significant * NS: Not Significant
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Auditorías Internas 5 9 5
Auditorías Aenor 4 5 3
GOAlS AND OBJECTIVES
Nº COMPlIANCE COMPlIANCE REMARKS
1 Reduce the number of incidents detected in 2011 with regard to use of reserves and detection of non-compliances of APU and engine tests with respect to 2009 data
+15% (2010 w.r.t. 2009)
2 Reduce potable water consumption for non-human use by 5% with respect to that used in 2007
-68.44% (2010 w.r.t. 2007) (fountains -26.56% irrigation
-124.35%)
3 Adapt air monitoring system at airport to comply with new legal requirements
in progress
4 Prepare EMAS certification in progress
5 Increase selective pick-up of urban waste in 2010 by 5% with respect to previous year
+94.88% (2010 w.r.t. 2009)
6 Obtain permit for airport to discharge to absorbing wells in progress
7 Increase environmental performance of companies in 2010 by 2% with respect to the previous year and promote environmental awareness
+7.55% (2010 w.r.t. 2009)
8 Analyze possible use of renewable energies in progress
9 Develop initiatives to have all employees, including management, supply ideas to contribute to the development and improvement of the system
10 Decrease the amount of absorbent sand waste by 10% in 2012 with respect to 2008
-37.97 (2010 w.r.t. 2008)
11 Decrease the amount of lead battery waste by 5% in 2012 with respect to 2008
-63.61% (2010 w.r.t. 2008)
2010 environmental management program: Goals and objectives
The goals of the Palma de Mallorca Airport’s Environ- mental Management Program for 2011, along with each objective’s level of compliance, are shown below.
Environmental Management System (EMS)
Internal audit
The report for the last internal audit, conducted in March 2010, detected seven non-conformities.
External audit
The report for the last follow-up audit, conducted in April 2010, identified one non-conformity.
NON-CONFORMITIES
Aenor 5 3 1
Aena 3 14 12
TOTAL 46 26 23
Closed 40 23 12
Open 6 3 11
Aena Aena
Water consumption
Potable water for general consumption and reclaimed water for irrigation are supplied by the company EMAYA. The airport has a water purification plant in which the water intended for human consumption is filtered by a process of reverse osmosis.
In an effort to reduce the consumption of potable wa- ter, an initial phase of connecting the reclaimed water network to areas irrigated with potable water has been completed, data from water meters has been reviewed to identify points with excessive water usage and water feeders have been installed in the vehicle wash to pre- vent excessive water use.
The system for collecting and reusing the water used in drills is still in service at the FFS facilities.
Potable water consumption:
Aena potable water usage: decreased by 20.11% with respect to 2009.
- Ornamental fountains: increased by 31.19%
- Irrigation with potable water: decreased by 65.75%
- Human consumption: decreased by 9.25%
Including the companies at the airport, potable water usage dropped by 18.89% with respect to the year before.
Reclaimed water usage for irrigation: increased by 48.89% with respect to 2009.
POTABlE WATER LITERS PASSENGERS LITERS/PASSENGER
2008 514,869,832 22,832,947 22,549
2009 606,261,000 21,203,041 28,593
2010 484,369,000 21,117,417 22,937
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
Potable water irrigation 166,124,832 155,186,000 53,154,000
Reclaimed water irrigation 49,514,000 26,804,000 39,908,000
2008 2009 2010
Total Aena + Cos, 669,000,000 666,924,000 540,973,000
2007 2008 2009
Human consumption 360,247,000 396,981,000 246,444,000
Ornamental fountains 70,968,000 54,094,000 102,301,000
Potable water irrigation 53,154,000 155,186,000 166,124,832
Reclaimed water irrigation
39,908,000 26,804,000 49,514,000
Electricity consumption
In 2010, the amount of electricity used rose by 0.9% with respect to the previous year. Since the number of passengers dropped by 0.4%, the indicator went up by 1.31%.
ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION (kWh)
2008 79,485,516 22,832,947 3.481
2009 78,078,016 21,203,041 3.682
2010 78,783,820 21,117,417 3.731
Fuel consumption
As regards the fuel usage in the diesel generators, the last year saw a drop of 54.83% with respect to 2009, stemming from a reduction in the number of hours of operation.
The fuel used in vehicles dropped by 3.11%.
Environmental performance – Operational control
Natural gas consumption
Starting in November 2009, natural gas replaced pro- pane air to fuel the boilers. Consumption in 2010 rose by 3.34% with respect to the previous year.
HOURS OF OPERATION – DIESEL GENERATORS
144:00
120:00
96:00
72:00
48:00
24:00
TOTAl 315:01:00 340:24:00 180:51:00
2008 2009 2010
No. 1 emerg. generator No. 2 emerg. generator No. 3 emerg. generator
27
2008 2009 2010
FUEL CONSUMPTION: VEHICLES
2008 2009 2010
Starting in November 2009, air propane was replaced by natural gas.
Paper consumption
The year 2010 saw a 7.57% drop in the use of paper with respect to the previous year.
Solar energy
The airport has a solar installation, featuring 192 pan- els located on the roof of the terminal building, that is used to provide hot drinking water. This system supplies several areas of the terminal building, including passen- ger washrooms, personnel services and restaurants. It features a six-tank hot water reservoir with a 5000-liter capacity per tank.
The system was taken off line several times over the course of 2010 for repairs, meaning only 9,700 therm- hours was generated.
Solar panels
Waste management
Hazardous waste
Aena generates several types of hazardous waste as a result of the various activities that take place at the air- port.
This waste is stored in suitable containers which are then removed by authorized handlers in accordance with ex- isting regulations.
The airport has had a permit to produce hazardous waste since 2008.
The study done to minimize the generation of this waste is valid until 2013.
In 2010 there was a 38.47% reduction in the amount of hazardous, special and medical waste removed.
The hazardous waste that is generated by the compa- nies that operate at the airport is tracked via the envi- ronmental monitoring of companies program.
WASTE 2008 2009 2010
Ionic 0 0 0
Photographic material 0 0.1 2
Expired medicines 95 33 154
Printer ribbons 562 0 0
Used vegetable oil 51 56 53
Oily water (*) 2,154.00 50,137.00 51,396.00
Used solvents (*) 1,287.00 2,209.00 1,545.00
Aerosol packaging and containers (*) 83 632,6 199
Contaminated empty containers (*) 834 503 831
Aqueous cleaning fluids (*) 1,250.00 1,850.00 1,700.00
Sludge from oil separators (*) 500 0 6,853.00
Used button batteries (*) 0.2 0.2 0.3
Reactants (*) 0 0 20
Waste contaminated with cutting fluid (*) 0 0 0
30
Contaminated absorbent sand (*) 3,695.00 1,747.00 2,292.00
Contaminated rags (*) 1,852.00 1,770.00 922
Paint residue (*) 208 241 124
Electrical and electronic waste (*) 6,019.00 69,942.00 4,821.00
Asbestos waste (*) 138 117 880
Fluorescent, Hg and Na bulbs (*) 1,510.00 2,186.00 3,619.00
Disused halogen bulbs (*) 0 0 0
Developing liquid (*) 0 0 0
Toner and other ink waste (*) 227 150 233,5
Used mineral or synthetic oil (*) 740 922 1,852.00
Used oil and fuel filters (*) 279 163 178
Degraded anti-freeze(*) 5,372.00 32 41
Freon waste (*) 47 0 0
Oil-freon emulsions (*) 368 200 0
Used Ni-Cd batteries (*) 26 10 66
Used lead batteries (*) 5,457.00 927 1,986.00
Water-oil emulsions (*) 0 0 0
Brake pads (*) 105 11 9
Treated wood 2,700
Vehicles at end of useful life (units) 11 12 10
Tires (units) 23 171 230
(*) Hazardous waste
Sludge from oil separators 500.00 0 6,853.00
Electrical and electronic waste 6,019.00 69,942.00 4,821.00
Fluorescent, Hg and Na bulbs 1,510.00 2,186.00 3,619.00
Contaminated absorbent sand 3,695.00 1,747.00 2,292.00
Used lead batteries 5,457.00 927.00 1,986.00
Used mineral or synthetic oil 740.00 922.00 1,852.00
Aqueous cleaning fluids 1,250.00 1,850.00 1,700.00
Used solvents 1,287.00 2,209.00 1,545.00
Contaminated rags 1,852.00 1,770.00 922.00
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Fluorescent, Hg and Na bulbs 3,619.00
Contaminated absorbent sand 2,292.00
Used lead batteries 1,986.00
Aqueous cleaning fluids 1,700.00
Fluorescent, Hg and Na bulbs 4%
Contaminated absorbent sand 3%
Used lead batteries 3%
Aqueous cleaning fluids 2%
Inert and bulky waste
Aena’s activities also result in the generation of various types of non-hazardous waste at the airport. This waste is sorted and handled through authorized carriers as re- quired by law.
The year 2010 saw a 52.54% drop in the amount of construction and demolition waste, and an 8.62% drop in the removal of bulky waste.
As for the non-hazardous waste generated by compa- nies that operate at the airport, this is tracked through the environmental monitoring of companies.
One batch of treated wood was handled in 2010 as a hazardous material (2,700 kg). This was not included in the total.
WASTE 2008 2009 2010
CONSTRUCTION/DEMOLITION 467,910 210,860 100,070
GLASS 3,950 0 2,700
SCRAP METAL 8,376 30,685 21,500
PLASTIC 7,730 7,920 10,909
BULKY 41,420 61,638 61,800
TOTAL HAZARDOUS 36,050,15 134,703.87
500,000
450,000
400,000
350,000
300,000
250,000
200,000
150,000
100,000
50,000
Bulky 30%
Urban waste
There is a transfer plant for urban waste at the airport, as well as drop-off areas throughout the airport complex intended to encourage the sorting of waste. All waste is removed by the city’s waste handler.
There was a 14.22% drop in 2010 versus 2009 in the amount of unsorted urban waste generated. The amount of sorted urban waste picked up saw a notable increase (94.88%).
Paper-cardboard: 24% increase
Glass: 351% increase
Packaging: 1235% increase, due mainly to the instal- lation of recycling containers at the terminal’s exits.
Of all the urban waste generated at the airport, 12.39% was sorted for recycling, 111.34% more than in 2009.
PAPER & CARDBOARD SORTED FOR RECYCLING 300,000
250,000
200,000
150,000
100,000
50,000
2008 2009 2010
Glass
Packaging
180,000
160,000
140,000
120,000
100,000
80,000
60,000
40,000
20,000
6,000,000
5,000,000
4,000,000
3,000,000
2,000,000
1,000,000
Sewage network
The airport has its own sewage network that dumps into the city’s network before processing at the Sant Jordi treatment facility, located near the airport’s own facility. In order to comply with municipal ordinances involving discharge parameters, the airport monitors the activi- ties of Aena and of airport concessionaires by sampling the quality of the water discharged. Those areas that pose the greatest risk of direct and diffuse pollution are equipped with oil separators.
The quality at the water discharged at the outlet is de- termined through quarterly analyses of the suction tank, which revealed an 83% compliance rate over the course of 2010.
Storm drains
As part of our commitment to avoid polluting the air- port’s aquifer as much as possible, separators have been installed in those areas with the highest risk of oil spills. These separators are connected to the storm drains, and all new construction areas where an absorbing well was created also feature a separator.
The water in the storm drains was sampled in the first quarter. In March, this analysis revealed a violation in the hydrocarbons, oil and grease parameters in one of the absorbing wells.
Starting in the second quarter, the analyses were per- formed monthly as required by the Water Authority and as a consequence of the permit to discharge rain water to the absorbing well, which also specified the need to study piezometric heights so as to determine the direc- tion of underground water flows. This was done in Oc- tober 2010.
The analyses for this second period revealed a 100% compliance rate.
38
39
All jetway parking stands have a 400-Hz electrical supply, which avoids having to use the auxiliary power unit (APU) to keep systems onboard aircraft opera- tional.
All AENA vehicles at the airport undergo routine maintenance inspections..
Monitoring of air quality
Atmospheric emissions
The boilers and diesel generators undergo periodic maintenance and their emissions are analyzed as re- quired by law. The measurements taken annually of the boilers were consistently below limits. The opacity parameter in the diesel generator analysis was over the legal limit.
2008 CO 1.445 ppm NO2 300 ppm SO2 850 mg/Nm3 IND BACH 2
No. 1 emerg. gen. 77.4 68.79 33.13 6
No. 2 emerg. gen. 162 189.08 <25.74 4
No. 3 emerg. gen. 77.5 80.34 <25.74 5
No. 3 UPS
No. 4 UPS
2009 CO 1.445 ppm NO2 SO2 1.700 mg/Nm3 IND BACH 2
No. 1 emerg. gen. 146 1001 <91.5 4
No. 2 emerg. gen. 87 917 <91.5 4
No. 3 emerg. gen. 159 1,333 194 4
No. 3 UPS 191 633 177 5
No. 4 UPS 217 665 166 3
2010 CO 1.445 ppm NO2 SO2 1.700 mg/Nm3 IND BACH 2
No. 1 emerg. gen. 175.9 5.26 < 28.5 6
No. 2 emerg. gen. 163.3 10.46 51.3 6
No. 3 emerg. gen. 98 19.54 106.13 6
No. 3 UPS 145.43 53.84 74.73 6
No. 4 UPS 149.8 204.24 111.16 6
DIESEL GENERATORS
2008 2009 2010
Atmospheric pollutant levels
The airport features a system for tracking and moni- toring air quality. This system consists of measuring equipment (SANOA), that continuously gathers data on
inhalation levels for key contaminants (SO2, NO, NO2, ozone, benzene, toluene, M-xylene, etc.). For every pa- rameter, the values recorded were below the thresholds specified by the various applicable regulations.
INHALATION LEVELS OF NO2 AND NO
NO2
NO
41
used to record noise levels and which allows the noise made by an aircraft flying over any of the noise terminals strategically located around the airport to be detected, measured and associated with a specific aircraft.
Control of noise emissions
There is an Integrated System for Monitoring Noise and Flight Paths (SIRPA) at the airport that is
The company that used reverse thrusters the most was AIR BERLIN, with 41 occurrences over the course of 2010. This was 45% of the total number of uses and 3.84% of its total nighttime operations (1069). In 2009, AIR BERLIN used re- verse thrusters nine times.
Reverse thrusters
The SIRPA system is used to track and monitor the use of reverse thrusters during nighttime hours.
A slight increase was noted in the use of reverse thrusters during nighttime landings with respect to the previous year.
USE OF REVERSE THRUSTERS DURING NIGHTTIME OPERATIONS 2008 - 2010
A
2008 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Total Uses
9 7 7 7 22 7 6 9 10 5 4 3
Total Nighttime Landings
350 242 426 590 1,018 1,012 1,324 1,581 1,110 786 153 237
% Night Landings
with Thrusters
2008
2.57% 2.89% 1.64% 1.19% 2.16% 0.69% 0.45% 0.57% 0.90% 0.64% 2.61% 1.27%
B
Accumulated uses
9 16 23 30 52 59 65 74 84 89 93 96
Accumulated Night
Landings 350 592 1,018 1,608 2,626 3,638 4,962 6,543 7,653 8,439 8,592 8,829
Accumul. % Night
Landings w/ Rev. 2008
2.57% 2.70% 2.26% 1.87% 1.98% 1.62% 1.31% 1.13% 1.10% 1.05% 1.08% 1.09%
42
A
2009 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Total Uses
2 2 0 0 1 8 15 16 13 10 9 4
Total Nighttime Landings
165 178 300 511 743 904 1,100 1,175 812 553 202 110
% Night Landings
with Thrusters
2009
1.21% 1.12% 0.00% 0.00% 0.13% 0.88% 1.36% 1.36% 1.60% 1.81% 4.46% 3.64%
B
Accumulated uses
2 4 4 4 5 13 28 44 57 67 76 80
Accumulated Night
Landings 165 343 643 1,154 1,897 2,801 3,901 5,076 5,888 6,441 6,643 6,753
Accumul. % Night
Landings w/ Rev.. 2009
1.21% 1.17% 0.62% 0.35% 0.26% 0.46% 0.72% 0.87% 0.97% 1.04% 1.14% 1.18%
2010 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
A
Total Uses
0 0 5 5 16 13 8 9 16 15 2 3
Total Nighttime Landings
24 65 292 445 620 788 1.064 1.016 815 598 261 245
% Night Landings
with Thrusters
2009
0.00% 0.00% 1.71% 1.12% 2.58% 1.65% 0.75% 0.89% 1.96% 2.51% 0.77% 1.22%
B
Accumulated uses
0 0 5 10 26 39 47 56 72 87 89 92
Accumulated Night
Landings 24 89 381 826 1,446 2,234 3,298 4,314 5,129 5,727 5,988 6,233
Accumul. % Night
Landings w/ Rev.. 2010
0.00% 0.00% 1.31% 1.21% 1.80% 1.75% 1.43% 1.30% 1.40% 1.52% 1.49% 1.48%
Environmental performance – Operational control
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
USE OF REVERSE THRUSTERS DURING NIGHTTIME LANDINGS 2008 - 2009 - 2010
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
43
MONTHLY COMPARISON OF % USE OF REVERSE THRUSTERS FOR NIGHTTIME LANDINGS 2008 - 2009 - 2010
A
B
2008
2008
2009
2009
2010
2010
5.00
4.00
3.00
2.00
1.00
3.00
2.00
1.00
44
the Palma Airport in mid December of 2010. They were published in the AIP (Aeronautical Information Publication) on 16 December 2010.
Noise complaints
Only one complaint involving aircraft noise was received in 2010 out of a total of 174,634 movements.
Noise Isolation Plan
Aena is carrying out a Noise Isolation Plan (PAA in Span- ish) to soundproof homes located within the airport’s noise footprint, the goal being to have noise levels within said homes be below the maximum permissible by law.
Green landings
One of the goals of Aena’s Environmental Action Plan is to implement Constant Descent Approach (CDA) procedures, also called “Green Landings”, for the airports in its network during nighttime hours. The goal is to decrease noise levels by 4 to 6 dB A (decibels A) in towns located between 11 and 22 nautical miles from the runway threshold and to cut CO2 emissions by 300 to 480 Kg per flight.
These procedures were presented by Aena’s Environment Director to town hall and neighborhood representatives at a meeting held in early December, and went into effect at
Environmental performance – Operational control
NOISE ISOLATION PLAN PALMA
Sant Jord Others
Number of dwellings entitled to request soundproofing 445 214 153 209 1,021
Total number of requests received for sound proofing within footprint 386 174 110 114 784
Total number of dwellings approved for measurement 386 174 106 99 765
Number of applications received for soundproofing 381 160 87 93 721
Projects presented to PAA Management Office 364 155 82 81 682
Number of dwellings for which financing was approved 363 157 82 76 678
Number of dwellings being soundproofed 17 31 9 19 76
Number of dwellings with sound proofing installed and paid for 346 126 73 57 602
NOISE ISOLATION PLAN FOR PALMA (PAA) Environmental Impact Statement (14/08/04)
PROGRESS OF NOISE ISOLATION PLAN (AS OF 31/12/10)
45
66,40% OF PAA COMPLETED
The following values yield the rate of progress in execut- ing the PAA:
Total number of dwellings with financing approved: 678 Number of dwellings entitled to request soundproofing: 1,021
R =
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
700
600
500
400
300
200
100
37.31
236
56.44
421
66.40
602
46
There was a decrease in the number of non-conformities with respect to previous years due to the increasing en- vironmental awareness of the companies. The highest number of deficiencies in 2010 was observed in the areas of waste management and control of discharges.
In 2010, a total of 158 companies located within the airport complex were inspected and 307 visits were made as part of the environmental monitoring of companies program.
The environmental compliance of the companies that oper- ate at the airport increased by 7.55%.
Control of hazardous material storage
The registry of petroleum product facilities dates from 27/06/07. This registry includes the following tanks:
Environmental monitoring of companies
All of the organizations that engage in activities within the airport complex are monitored to ensure that they comply with current environmental regulations so that, as a whole, the airport’s environmental performance can be improved.
In addition to environmental monitoring, the various fa- cilities within the airport complex are visited periodically to detect possible incorrect environmental practices, which are reported to the relevant company so that they can be immediately corrected.
FUEL TYPE TANKS CAPACITY
re
QuARTER I II III IV I II III IV I II III IV
SCORE 84 79 78 72 81 85 87 80 87 88 91 89
Sc o
49
ACTIVITY TYPE 2008 2009 2010
no. % no. % no. %
1. Stores 1 3.45% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%
2. Offices. indoor warehouses and restaurants 4 13.79% 1 25.00% 1 20.00%
3. Outdoor warehouses and hangars 2 6.90% 0 0.00% 1 20.00%
4. Handling and self-handling 6 20.69% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%
5. Land and building concessions 7 24.14% 1 25.00% 2 40.00%
6. Projects and supplies 5 17.24% 1 25.00% 0 0.00%
7. Services 0 0.00% 1 25.00% 0 0.00%
8. Technical assistance 0 0.00% 0 0.00% 0 0.00%
9. Fuel suppliers 4 13.79% 0 0.00% 1 20.00%
Total 29 100.00% 4 100.00% 5 100.00%
2008
2009
2010
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
50
emissions
8. Other aspects
2008
1 9 10.1% 39 43.8% 63 70.8% 14 15.7% 18 20.2% 11 12.4% 23 25.8% 7 7.9%
2 8 8.9% 50 55.6% 47 52.2% 8 8.9% 24 26.7% 10 11.1% 22 24.4% 11 12.2%
3 5 8.9% 29 51.8% 33 58.9% 0 0.0% 10 17.9% 7 12.5% 19 33.9% 4 7.1%
4 10 11.9% 44 52.4% 42 50.0% 0 0.0% 10 11.9% 10 11.9% 12 14.3% 4 4.8%
TOTAL 32 10.0% 162 50.9% 185 58.0% 22 6.2% 62 19.2% 38 12.0% 76 24.6% 26 8.0%
2009
1 8 9.8% 26 31.7% 39 47.6% 0 0.0% 10 12.2% 15 18.3% 20 24.4% 1 1.2%
2 9 15.3% 15 25.4% 25 42.4% 0 0.0% 3 5.1% 9 15.3% 10 16.9% 2 3.4%
3 4 7.3% 12 21.8% 14 25.5% 0 0.0% 5 9.1% 6 10.9% 13 23.6% 4 7.3%
4 4 4.5% 30 33.7% 39 43.8% 5 5.6% 6 6.7% 12 13.5% 9 10.1% 4 4.5%
TOTAL 25 9.2% 83 28.2% 117 39.8% 5 1.4% 24 8.3% 42 14.5% 52 18.8% 11 4.1%
2010
1 7 9.6% 22 30.1% 23 31.5% 4 5.5% 11 15.1% 13 17.8% 12 16.4% 4 5.5%
2 7 8.0% 19 21.8% 22 25.3% 5 5.7% 5 5.7% 7 8.0% 10 11.5% 5 5.7%
3 6 8.8% 9 13.2% 15 22.1% 2 2.9% 5 7.4% 5 7.4% 10 14.7% 6 8.8%
4 8 10.1% 20 25.3% 21 26.6% 2 2.5% 3 3.8% 9 11.4% 8 10.1% 5 6.3%
TOTAL 28 9.1% 70 22.6% 81 26.4% 13 4.2% 24 8.0% 34 11.1% 40 13.2% 20 6.6%
AREAS OF IMPROVEMENT
2008
2009
2010
200
180
160
140
120
100
80
60
40
20
Environmental management at Iberia
Energy efficiency and renewable energies
Verification of greenhouse gases. A case study of the aviation industry
Aena’s environmental action plan
Training and awareness
3rd Environment Day
On 2 December 2010, the 3rd Annual Environment Day and the 2nd Annual Occupational Risk Prevention day were held. This event focused on improving energy ef- ficiency and highlighted the good environmental man- agement by companies at the airport.
Various lectures were given on environmental and oc- cupational risk prevention topics. These lectures saw greater participation than in previous years.
Attendees at the 3rd annual Environment Day
52
Award to the company with the best envi- ronmental management
All of the companies that engage in year-round activities at the Palma de Mallorca Airport, either through a con- tract or concession, are eligible for this award. The same assessment criteria were used as in the year before.
The award recognizes the efforts of that company that implemented measures over the course of 2010 to im- prove its environmental management.
The panel that judged the candidates included rep- resentatives from the Balearic Island’s Environmental Council, CAEB, AENOR Balearic Islands and the Board of Governors of the Palma de Mallorca Airport.
The winner for 2010 was AIR EUROPA, which was pre- sented with a replica of the Anfora sculpture located in the airport as well as with a commemorative certifi- cate.
External Environmental Committee
One of the initiatives undertaken in 2010 by the Environ- mental Department was to create an External Environmen- tal Committee so as to improve the airport’s environmental management. This committee’s members are those airport companies with the greatest environmental impact.
This committee meets every four months, and met in July and November 2010 to discuss topics involving waste management, the consumption of general resources, non-
Panel and winners of the 3rd Environment Day
Environmental performance – Operational control
53
conformities and a presentation on best practices regarding discharges to the storm drains.
Environmental recommendations
The personnel at Aena and at the airport companies were sent the following awareness messages in 2010:
Emissions: emissions and music
Consumption of natural resources
Waste: oil as waste
Fauna
The results of the study on bird populations at the Pal- ma de Mallorca Airport in the third quarter of 2009, conducted by the BCN Falcon Center, were received in 2010. The study identified 75 bird species, with the most abundant being the rock dove (Columbia livia), followed by the corn bunting (Emberiza calandra), the house sparrow (Passer domesticus), the red-legged par- tridge (Alectoris rufa) and the barn swallow (Hirunda rustica).
The highest diversity is seen in the autumn months, coinciding with the migrations of several species. Fifteen bird species have been identified around the artificial pond, most of them common wetland spe- cies.
In terms of aviation safety, the most problematic resi- dent species are the cattle egret and the yellow-legged hull. Other species of potential concern in terms of air traffic safety are the common wood pigeon
(Columba palumbus), the rock dove, the mallard duck and the house sparrow.
The airport’s falconry permit for use in controlling bird populations was renewed in 2010 by the Government of the Balearic Island’s Environmental Council.
Falcon
54
Flora
There are several types of vegetation within the airport complex, most of which exhibit a clear anthropic influ- ence. This vegetation is adapted to the soil type, the semi-arid Mediterranean climate, the depth of the wa- ter table and to the different uses to which the soil has been subjected over time.
The typical garrigue vegetation grows in the highest elevations, with a tree stratum of Aleppo pines (Pinus halepensis) and a shrub stratum of Pistacia lentiscus, Olea europaea and cistaceae. Around the airport pe- rimeter the growth of plants intended to attenuate noise levels has been encouraged. Of note is the artifi- cial berm several meters in height at the south runway
which shields the population of Can Pastilla from noise. This barrier was initially covered in tamarinds, pistacias, Aleppo pines and olive trees, though it was left unirri- gated for several yearsso that spontaneous vegetation would grow in its place. At the north perimeter there is a large area of Aleppo pines of various ages mixed with typical Mediterranean garrigue plants. On a side note, the first case of a red-palm weevil infestation af- fecting a Canary palm within the airport complex was reported in 2010.
The woody Helianthemum marifolium sp. origani- folium grows in the Es Carnatge protected area. This small, creeping plant is endangered in Mallorca and its populations are surveyed annually by the Environmental Council.
Environmental performance – Operational control
Mosquito control in the Sant Jordi-Palma Air- port area
In December 2010, the campaign to track and control the mosquito populations in the airport’s wetlands came to an end. The year 2010 was particularly favorable to booming mosquito populations due to the exceptio- nal rainfall received in May (116 mm), which left large water-logged areas near the north and south runway thresholds. The surface water did not drain until late July, leaving large pools of water during months in
which average temperatures hover above 20º C, thus accelerating the mosquito’s biological cycle. To deal with this exceptional situation, Aena took part in programs in concert with the Palma City Hall, EMAYA and the Laboratory of Zoology and Emerging Diseases at the UIB, to combat the mosquito population in 2010. The use of pesticides was started in May to control the larvae and adult mosquitos in flooded areas and su- rrounding vegetation. The type and volume of pesticide used was coordinated and supervised by UIB technicians through weekly updates on the mosquito population in the Sant Jordi-Palma Airport area. .
Lagoon at the airport
56
Steps to lower the water table of the Sant Jordi-Airport area
As noted in the previous section, the strong rains of 2010 flooded several areas in and around the airport until well into the summer season. These conditions strongly favored the proliferation of mosquitos in the Palma bay, causing a nuisance to residents and tourists alike. To reduce the size of the flood area, the Water Au- thority, in coordination with local administrations, land owners, the Son Sant Joan military base and the Palma Airport, launched initiatives in the summer intended to lower the water table in the affected area. Before pum- ping the water out to the stream that empties into the sea, the S’Uyal canal and the irrigation ditch that runs under the south runway was cleaned and the water le- vel was monitored to ensure it would not interfere with the safety of airport operations.
Community relations
As part of its commitment to collaboration and open communications, the airport invites community represen- tatives to get involved in airport activities. The goal of these meetings is to address topics of interest in a cordial and transparent setting that allows for problems and con- cerns to be presented and for joint solutions to be found. Four meetings were held in 2010: in February and Oc- tober with neighborhood associations and business and hotel owners from Playa de Palma, and in June with town halls. In December, so as to take advantage of a visit from Aena’s Director for the Environment, a joint meeting was held with town halls and neighborhood associations.
When maintenance work requires closing down either the north or south runway, the town halls of Palma, Ma- rratxí, Santa Eugenia, Costitx, Calviá and Sencelles are notified, as are neighborhood associations in Ca’n Pas- tilla and Sant Jordi, business owners associations in Ca’n Pastilla and hotel owners associations in Playa de Palma.
Neoghborhood meeting
Environmental Management Award
In January 2010, the Palma de Mallorca Airport was recognized by the Spanish Association for Standardiza- tion and Certification (AENOR) for its commitment to the environment and for seeking constant improvement in this area.
This distinction recognizes the environmental manage- ment effort made by Aena at the Palma de Mallorca Airport.
.
Palma de Mallorca Airport 2010 Environmental Management Report
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