Off-Season & In-Season Fitness Training for Football (Soccer)

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Transcript of Off-Season & In-Season Fitness Training for Football (Soccer)

  1. 1. OFF-SEASON & IN-SEASON TRAINING FOR FOOTBALL Mike Young, PhD @mikeyoung Athletic Lab
  2. 2. ROADMAP Fundamental principles Physical demands of the sport Application of concepts
  3. 3. Fundamental Principles
  4. 4. PLAN AHEA
  5. 5. BUT....
  6. 6. Write in Pencil
  7. 7. GENERAL TRAINING ENHANCES FUNCTION [AND DECREASES LIKELIHOOD FOR INJURIES]
  8. 8. Specic Training Enhances Performance [but potentially increases dysfunction]
  9. 9. THE BEST WAYTO PREVENT SORENESS ISTO DOTHE THINGSTHAT ! MAKEYOU SORE
  10. 10. RECOGNIZE&RESPECT DIFFERINGRATESOFDECAYFOR PHYSICALCAPACITIES
  11. 11. Some things go bad quickly
  12. 12. Others take much longer
  13. 13. Days 1-2: Beta-endorphin and adrenaline levels drop. Mood is affected negatively. Days 3-5: Muscles lose elasticity. Aerobic capabilities drop off 5% by the fth day off. Days 7-9: Bodys ability to use oxygen (VO2 max) drops by 10%. Less oxygenated blood is pumped with each beat. Day 10: Bodys metabolic rate begins to drop. Eat less or youll gain weight. Days 11-13: Maximum heart rate and cardiac output decline by 15%. Muscle tone sees rst appreciable loss. Days 14-16: Mitochondrial activity (energy production) in muscle cells begins to decrease rapidly. Loss of muscle mass, strength and metabolic rate occurs. Days 17-19: Body becomes less efcient at thermoregulation. You are forced to spend excess energy cooling off. Days 20-21: VO2 max has dropped by about 20%. Days 22-25: 10-15% loss of muscle mass and that lost mass is replaced by fat. Days 27-29: Muscle strength drops by as much as 30%.
  14. 14. RATES OF DECAY Aerobic capacity! Anaerobic lactic capacity! Power! Speed! Maximum strength
  15. 15. ACKNOWLEDGE & RESPECTTHE PHYSICAL STIMULUS OF GAMES
  16. 16. BUT KNOWTHAT GAMES ARE NOTTHE BEST STIMULUS FOR FITNESS
  17. 17. Performance is the outcome of fitness and fatigue
  18. 18. UNDERSTAND THIS
  19. 19. Fatigue Masks Fitness
  20. 20. FAIR IS NOT EQUAL EQUAL IS NOT FAIR
  21. 21. DONT LET PLAYERS SLIP THROUGH THE CRACKS
  22. 22. USE BUCKETS Starters! Reserves! Non-dress! Injured! Mid-Season transfers! Fast anaerobic players! Aerobic players
  23. 23. PHYSICAL DEMANDS
  24. 24. Players cover average of 10-12km in a game (~6 miles) Game is 80-90 minutes of continuous activity 10-12km / 80-90 min = average pace of ~7km / hr (roughly 13 mile pace)
  25. 25. Players cover average of 10-12km in a game (~6 miles) Game is 80-90 minutes of continuous activity 10-12km / 80-90 min = average pace of ~7km / hr (roughly 13 mile pace) Logical conclusion.... run, run, run (slow & steady)
  26. 26. Flaw of Averages
  27. 27. FITNESS DEMANDS ANALYSIS OF MOTOR ACTIVITIES OF PROFESSIONAL SOCCER PLAYERSMARCIN ANDRZEJEWSKI,1,2 JAN CHMURA,3 BEATA PLUTA,1 AND ANDRZEJ KASPRZAK2 1 Faculty of Methodology and Recreation, University School of Physical Education, Poznan, Poland; 2 KKS Lech Poznan S.A, Football Club, Poznan, Poznan, Poland; and 3 Faculty of Players Motor Activity, University School of Physical Education, Wrocaw, PolandABSTRACT Andrzejewski, M, Chmura, J, Pluta, B, and Kasprzak, A. Analysis of motor activities of professional soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 26(6): 14811488, 2012The objective of this study was to determine the distance covered by professional soccer players during matches with the use of the computer- ized match analysis system Amisco Pro (version 1.0.2, Nice, France). Kinematic examination included the specication of the distance covered by 31 players participating in 4 matches in the Union of European Football Association during the 200 tactical, and mental preparation from the players (23). Recently, much attention has been paid to the selection of players possessing proper anthropometric and efciency proles, thus providing for the possibility of systematic workouts that allow players to achieve optimum perfor- mance. The preparation of a player is frequently focused on the improvement of technical or tactical skills at the expense of developing motor abilities (2,3,17,22,27). Lik team sports, soccer als
  28. 28. ANALYSIS OF MOTOR ACTIVITIES OF PROFESSIONAL SOCCER PLAYERSMARCIN ANDRZEJEWSKI,1,2 JAN CHMURA,3 BEATA PLUTA,1 AND ANDRZEJ KASPRZAK2 1 Faculty of Methodology and Recreation, University School of Physical Education, Poznan, Poland; 2 KKS Lech Poznan S.A, Football Club, Poznan, Poznan, Poland; and 3 Faculty of Players Motor Activity, University School of Physical Education, Wrocaw, PolandABSTRACT Andrzejewski, M, Chmura, J, Pluta, B, and Kasprzak, A. Analysis of motor activities of professional soccer players. J Strength Cond Res 26(6): 14811488, 2012The objective of this study was to determine the distance covered by professional soccer players during matches with the use of the computer- ized match analysis system Amisco Pro (version 1.0.2, Nice, France). Kinematic examination included the specication of the distance covered by 31 players participating in 4 matches in the Union of European Football Association during the 200 tactical, and mental preparation from the players (23). Recently, much attention has been paid to the selection of players possessing proper anthropometric and efciency proles, thus providing for the possibility of systematic workouts that allow players to achieve optimum perfor- mance. The preparation of a player is frequently focused on the improvement of technical or tactical skills at the expense of developing motor abilities (2,3,17,22,27). Lik team sports, soccer als Aerobic capacity is EXTREMELY important Average intensity approaches lactate threshold Mid-Fielders run the most
  29. 29. FITNESS DEMANDS
  30. 30. Aerobic endurance improves distance covered, number of sprints, involvements with the ball
  31. 31. FITNESS DEMANDS MATCH ACTIVITIES OF ELITE WOMEN SOCCER PLAYERS AT DIFFERENT PERFORMANCE LEVELS MAGNI MOHR,1 PETER KRUSTRUP,1 HELENA ANDERSSON,2 DONALD KIRKENDAL,3 AND JENS BANGSBO 1 1 Institute of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Department of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; 2 Department of Health Sciences, Orebro University, Sweden; 3 Center for Human Movement Science, Division of Physical Therapy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina ABSTRACT We sought to study the physical demands and match per- formance of women soccer players. Nineteen top-class and 15 high-level players were individually videotaped in competitive matches, and time-motion analysis were performed. The players ity .1,300 times in a game correspond- total. The top- INTRODUCTION T he physical aspects of elite soccer players have been studied extensively in men (1,2,10,12,14 18,22,25). Less information exists regarding the physical demands in women soccer players (5,6,7, 11,19,24). Body dimensions (8) and maximum aerobic power (6,8,11,23) of women players have been determined in several studies. In addition, some studies have examined the activity atch play (2,24). However, the main focus hich is believed to be
  32. 32. MATCH ACTIVITIES OF ELITE WOMEN SOCCER PLAYERS AT DIFFERENT PERFORMANCE LEVELS MAGNI MOHR,1 PETER KRUSTRUP,1 HELENA ANDERSSON,2 DONALD KIRKENDAL,3 AND JENS BANGSBO 1 1 Institute of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Department of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Denmark; 2 Department of Health Sciences, Orebro University, Sweden; 3 Center for Human Movement Science, Division of Physical Therapy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina ABSTRACT We sought to study the physical demands and match per- formance of women soccer players. Nineteen top-class and 15 high-level players were individually videotaped in competitive matches, and time-motion analysis were performed. The players ity .1,300 times in a game correspond- total. The top- INTRODUCTION T he physical aspects of elite soccer players have been studied extensively in men (1,2,10,12,14 18,22,25). Less information exists regarding the physical demands in women soccer players (5,6,7, 11,19,24). Body dimensions (8) and maximum aerobic power (6,8,11,23) of women players have been determined in several studies. In addition, some studies have examined the activity atch play (2,24). However, the main focus hich is believed to be Top-class players perform more high intensity runs than lesser peers Fatigue develops temporarily & towards the end of a game Defenders have lower work rates than mid-elders & attackers
  33. 33. FITNESS DEMANDS
  34. 34. Straight sprints are the most dominant powerful action in decisive offensive situations in elite soccer Most decisive powerful movements ending in goals are made without the ball
  35. 35. POSITIONAL DEMANDS Journal of Sports Science and Medicine (2007) 6, 63-70 http://www.jssm.org Physical demands of different positions in FA Premier League soccer Jonathan Bloomfield 1 , Remco Polman 2 and Peter O'Donoghue 3 1 Sports Institute of Northern Ireland, University of Ulster, Northern Ireland, UK, 2 Department of Sport, Health & Exercise Science, The University of Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire, UK, 3 School of Sport, University of Wales Insti- tute Cardiff, Cardiff, UK Abstract The purpose of this study was to evaluate the physical demands of English Football Association (FA) Premier League soccer of three different positional classifications (defender, midfielder and striker). Computerised time-motion video-analysis using the Bloomfield Movement Classification was undertaken on the purposeful movement (PM) performed by 55 players. Recogni- tion of PM had a good inter-tester reliability strength of agree- ment ( = 0.7277). Players spent 40.6 10.0% of the match performing PM. Position had a significant influence o time spent sprinting, running, shu still (p &l