Nutrition and Hydration ... 4 Training, Skills, Recovery, Psychology, Nutrition & Hydration...

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Transcript of Nutrition and Hydration ... 4 Training, Skills, Recovery, Psychology, Nutrition & Hydration...

  • Nutrition and Hydration

    Hertfordshire ASA

    21 February 2016

    Karen Howells

  • Dr KAREN HOWELLS

    Swimmer, Coach, Sport

    Psychologist, Sport and Fitness

    Lecturer, Mother

  • What factors contribute to

    superior performance?

    Training, Skills, Recovery, Psychology, Nutrition &

    Hydration

  • 4

    Training, Skills, Recovery, Psychology, Nutrition &

    Hydration

    Nutrition – what, how much, and when

    Hydration – what, how much, and when

  • 5

  • 6

    What do you expect the swimmers to eat

    as a training day/competition?

  • 7

    Focus on the functionality of the body rather than the

    aesthetics

  • 8

    Nutrition is defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the consumption of food relative to the body’s needs.

  • 9

    Nutrition is defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the consumption of food relative to the body’s needs.

    What do swimmers need?

  • 10

    • Males – 2500 Kcal

    • Females – 2000 Kcal

    How much?

    Not just restricted to exercise

  • Consider this . . .

    11

    An Olympic Swimmer can burn between 3000- 10000 calories per day (based on 2-4 hours

    training per day)

    A Recreational Swimmer can burn between 400-600 calories per hour (depending on

    intensity)

    An Age- Group/Youth

    Swimmer?

  • 12

    Nutrition is defined by the World Health Organisation (WHO) as the consumption of food relative to the body’s needs.

    Macronutrients - those needed in large amounts by the body consisting of carbohydrate, fat and protein.

    Micronutrients - those needed in smaller amounts consisting of vitamins and minerals.

  • 13

  • Carbohydrates

    Fast Release

    Slow Release

    • Table sugar • Dried fruit • Fizzy drinks • Sweets

    Digested quickly • Grains e.g.

    porridge • Brown pasta • Potatoes

    Digested slowly

  • Protein

    • Build and repair muscle tissue

    • Become hormones or promote hormone function

    • Maintain fluid and electrolyte balance

    • Promote the immune system

    • Be an energy source (both at rest and exercise)

    • Meat

    • Fish

    • Dairy

    • Soy

    • Legumes

    • Nuts

    • Grains

    • Vegetables

  • Healthy Fats

    • Fats which are naturally occurring and your body can use for:

    – Immunity

    – Vitamin Storage

    – Hormone production

    – Blood clotting

  • Fats which as usually man made and your body has no way of using them

    Unhealthy or Trans fats

  • 2. Baked potatoes – fill them with beans, sweet corn or chilli, not too much cheese, and remember to eat the skin, it’s the healthiest bit!.

    1. Beans on wholemeal toast – And if beans aren’t your thing, eggs will do a similar job

  • Pre-Training Snacks Recovery

    Include both fast absorbed carbohydrate & high quality protein.

    Recommended servings: Approx. 50-70g of carbohydrates. Approx. 20-30g of protein. Avoid high fat foods Avoid carbonated drinks

  • 1 x 250 ml strawberry alpro soya milk = 19.25g carbs, 8.25g protein Free Range Egg mayo sandwich = 37.6g carbs, 16.8g protein

    100g banana = 23g carbs, 1.1g protein, 100g of pumpkin seeds = 54g carbs, 19g protein

    150g of trail mix = 67.3g carbs, 20.7g protein

  • Competition Recovery

    • After each warm up and race

    • Try to have balance e.g. carbs and protein

    • If protein isn't as easy to transport or keep fresh etc have carbs and add protein to meals when possible.

    • Good options for protein sources:

    – Ambrosia rice pudding

    – UHT or soya milk

    – Nuts and seeds

  • Do your homework . . . Where can you eat away from home. Relying on Pizza Hut is not a great idea!

  • Hydration

    24

  • Hydration

    • The need for hydration

    • Sports drinks versus water

    25

  • What is hydration

    • The act of replenishing the fluid stored in your body

    • Humans are 50 - 60% water

    • Humans can survive 4-6 weeks without food but only a few days without water

    • Simple acts of breathing, temperature regulation and going to the toilet causes ½ - 1 litre fluid loss per day

    • Average intake of water:

    – Men: 3.7 litres per day

    – Women: 2.7 litres per day

  • Hydration • Dehydration, can have serious effects, including:

    – impaired cardiac function

    – reduced blood flow to the muscles and kidneys

    – increased risk of heat illnesses

    – decreased ability to sweat and thus regulate body temperature

    – loss of muscle glycogen stores

    27

    Dehydration is bad for you – sweating when swimming – lead to

    dehydration

  • Impact Dehydration Status

    Impaired performance 2%

    Capacity of muscle work declines 4%

    Heat Exhaustion 6%

    Hallucination 8%

    Heat stroke and circulatory collapse 10%

  • Performance impact

    • 2% dehydration = 10% drop in performance

    • Training target = 60.0 seconds

    • Dehydrated = 66.0 seconds

    • How disappointed would you be with this session?

    • If in a race it can be the difference between winning and losing

  • Hydration strategies

    • Drink little and often.

    • Always have a water bottle with you

    • Drink water / cordial to hydrate

    • Drinks which include caffeine cause greater urine loss. Bare this in mind when calculating your daily fluid intake.

    • Drink 750ml per hour when training

  • Sports Drinks or Water?

    • Sports Drinks – The downside

    • High in carbohydrates (sugars)

    • Additives such as colourings and stabilisers

    • Ingredients that produce a stimulant effect.

    31

  • Training fluids

    • Water based drinks.

    • If training 1 hour at 80% or harder possible need for a sports drink.

    • Ensure you start the session at optimum hydration.

    • Rehydrate after training.

  • A word on caffeine

    34

    • Endurance

    – 3-9 mg of caffeine per kg of body weight one hour prior to exercise increased endurance running and cycling (3 mg per kg body weight = 2 regular size cups of drip-percolated coffee)

    • Research suggests that caffeine ingestion improves performance during short-term exercise lasting approximately 5 minutes at maximum intensity

    – No help to sprinting

  • A word on caffeine

    35

    • Caffeine was removed from the list of banned substances in 2004

    • But . . .

    – Leads to dehydration

    – Can increase the effects of somatic (physical) anxiety

  • Dr. Karen Howells

    karenlhowells@btinternet.com

    Mobile: 07526486466

    Twitter: @mind4sportpsych

    36

    mailto:karenlhowells@btinternet.com