my baking journal - Uncommon Goods · PDF file shortcrust pastry. puff pastry. flaky pastry....

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Transcript of my baking journal - Uncommon Goods · PDF file shortcrust pastry. puff pastry. flaky pastry....

  • my baking journal

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  • if you find this journal please return to...

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  • spatulas

    mixing bowl

    oven mitt

    rolling pinwhisk

    cooling rack

    palette knife pastry brush

    measuring jug

    cookie cutters

    icing smoother

    apron

    scales measuring cups muffin tray

    food mixerwooden spoons

    essential baking equipment...

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  • my essential baking equipment...

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  • flour: wholemeal / whole-wheat flour: made by grinding the whole grain of wheat. To increase the nutritional profile of a bake, wholemeal flour can replace a portion of all-purpose flour. bread flour: contains more protein, and so more gluten. It is ideal for baking loaves with a chewy crumb. cake flour: lower in protein and gluten than all-purpose flour, cake flour is chemically treated then finely ground, which contributes to cakes with a lighter texture. pastry flour: a medium-protein flour that's ideal for tender pie crusts. self-raising flour: has leavening agents distributed throughout the flour, which helps with a consistent rise in scones / cakes etc. gluten free flours: are free from contamination with gluten and are suitable with people with coeliac disease and wheat allergies. Popular gluten free flours include tapioca flour, rice flour and buckwheat flour. cornmeal: is a coarse flour ground from dried maize. Perfect for cornbread - works well for crunchy waffles and pancakes. cornstarch: is a corn flour which is finely ground. It is commonly used in sauces and pie fillings for thickening.

    sugar: granulated sugar: when recipes just list sugar as an ingredient granulated sugar is what is required. icing sugar / powdered sugar / confectioners' sugar: is ground into ultra-fine particles and combined with starch so it doesn't cake up in its package. Perfect for frostings and icings. brown sugar: is refined sugar with molasses added. The amount of molasses in the mix accounts for the range of colour and flavour in light, medium and dark brown sugars. caster sugar: is granulated sugar ground into tiny crystals that dissolve very quickly. Because of this, some bakers like to use it to make meringues and sweeten whipped cream. You can substitute it 1:1 for regular granulated sugar.

    essential ingredients...

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  • eggs

    honeychocolate

    jam

    flour

    sugar

    maple syrup

    dessicated coconut

    oranges limelemon candied peel

    nuts

    cloves

    glace cherries

    vanilla pod

    ginger

    black treacle

    cinnamon

    essential baking ingredients...

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  • oven temperatures

    celsius fahrenheit gas mark oven heat

    110˚

    140˚

    160˚

    190˚

    220˚

    240˚

    120˚

    150˚

    180˚

    200˚

    230˚

    very cool

    cool

    moderate

    moderately hot

    hot

    very hot

    very cool

    cool

    moderate

    moderately hot

    very hot

    225˚

    275˚

    325˚

    375˚

    425˚

    475˚

    250˚

    300˚

    350˚

    400˚

    450˚

    ¼

    1

    3

    5

    7

    9

    ½

    2

    4

    6

    8

    volume fl ozlitres

    1.25 ml

    5 ml

    30 ml

    100 ml

    200 ml

    2.5 ml

    15 ml

    60 ml

    150 ml

    240 ml

    ¼ tsp

    1 tsp

    1 fl oz

    3.5 fl oz

    7 fl oz

    10 fl oz

    ½ tsp

    1 tbsp

    2 fl oz

    5 fl oz

    8 fl oz

    34 fl oz

    20 fl oz

    cupspints

    -

    -

    ¼ pint

    -

    -

    -

    -

    -

    ½ pint

    1.7 pints

    1 pint

    -

    -

    0.4 cup

    0.8 cup

    -

    -

    -

    -

    0.6 cup

    1 cup

    4.2 cups

    2 cups570 ml

    300 ml

    1 litre

    pint

    pint

    cup

    weight lb/ozgrams

    10g

    50g

    100g

    200g

    300g

    25g

    75g

    150g

    250g

    350g

    0.25oz

    1.75oz

    3.5oz

    7oz

    1oz

    2.75oz

    5.5oz

    9oz

    lb/ozgrams

    500g

    1kg

    400g

    750g

    2kg

    10.5oz

    12oz

    1lb 2oz

    2.25lb

    14oz

    1lb 10oz

    4.5lb

    *Remember to stick to either imperial or metric when using a recipe - don’t mix the two!

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  • please note

    round tin

    inches cms 6” 8” 9” 11”

    15cm 20cm 23cm 28cm

    5” 7” 8” 10”

    13cm 28cm 20cm

    25.5cm

    square tin

    inches cms

    If you're using a square tin for a round tin recipe, keep the temperature the same, and turn the cake during baking, as the corners tend to cook faster than the middle.

    tin sizes

    abbreviations

    short tsp dsp tbsp 1 spoonful 1 level spoon fl oz lb

    long teaspoon dessertspoon tablespoon 1 slightly rounded spoonful 1 flat spoonful fluid ounce pound

    1 Cup Flour, Sifted is not the same as 1 Cup Sifted Flour. When sifting you change the volume of the ingredients. 1 Cup Flour, Sifted means to sift the flour after measuring it. 1 Cup Sifted Flour means to add one cup of flour that was measured from already sifted flour. The same is true of measuring chopped ingredients: 1 Cup Nuts, Chopped means chop the nuts after measuring.

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  • Place a tray of boiling water on the bottom shelf of the oven before baking. this will help the top of the dough to open and gives the crust a beautiful rich colour.

    Use the windowpane test to make sure your dough has been kneaded sufficiently. take a golf ball sized chunk of dough and stretch it out between your thumbs and first two fingers - if it forms a thin membrane you can see through without breaking, the gluten networks are devel- oped and the dough is good to go!

    Use a baking stone for a great crust - they’re heavy and take a long time to heat up but baking stones help to create a brick oven atmosphere.

    Calibrate your oven. especially if your loaves are coming out too dark or too wet or taking longer to bake than the recipe says they should. and don’t forget to preheat your oven.

    Always freeze any left overs, but do not refrigerate your bread, or it will dry out too quickly. a loaf can keep for up to three months in the freezer.

    Replace half the water in a recipe with yoghurt! Yes really! This will give more flavour to white bread without it tasting milky.

    bread tips...

    kneading

    pide. tear and share bread. stollen. brioche. fougasse. tsoureki. baguette. barmbrack.

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  • you will need: method:

    basic bread recipe...

    500g (17oz) strong white flour, (plus extra for dusting)

    2 tsp salt

    7g (0.24oz) sachet fast-action yeast

    3 tbsp olive oil

    300ml (10 fl oz) water

    oven: 200˚C / 392˚F / gas 6

    1 baking tray

    makes: 1 loaf

    prep time: 20 minutes

    baking time: 25-30 minutes

    A great recipe for an electric breadmaker - or do it the traditional way!

    Mix 500g (17oz) strong white flour, 2 tsp salt and a 7g (0.24oz) sachet of fast-action yeast in a large bowl.

    Make a well in the centre, add 3 tbsp olive oil and 300ml (10fl oz) of water, and mix well. If the dough seems stiff, just add another 1-2 tbsp water and keep mixing.

    Tip onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 10 mins.

    Once the dough is satin-smooth, place it in a lightly oiled bowl and cover with cling film. Leave to rise for 1 hour until doubled in size or place in the fridge overnight.

    Line a baking tray with baking parchment. Knock back the dough (punch the air out and pull the dough in on itself ) then gently mould the dough into a ball.

    Place it on the baking parchment to prove for a further hour until doubled in size.

    Dust the loaf with some extra flour and cut a cross about 6cm long into the top of the loaf with a sharp knife.

    Bake for 25-30 mins until golden brown and when tapped underneath the loaf sounds hollow. Cool on a wire rack.

    sun-dried tomato bread. pizza dough. sourdough. pita. bagels. panettone. naan. scone

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  • shortcrust pastry. puff pastry. flaky pastry. rough puff pastry. choux pastry. filo pastry

    Make sure you rest the pastry in the fridge after handling it, this allows the fat to firm up - try to keep your kitchen, worktop and hands cool too.

    Don’t add too much flour to the work surface. before baking or folding the pastry, brush off excess flour. to avoid using flour at all - roll out pastry between two layers of cling film.

    Make sure your fillings are cold before pouring into tart cases, covering with pie lids or wrapping in filo otherwise the heat will cause the fat to melt and lead to soggy pastry.

    Glazing your pastry: egg whites create a very shiny finish, beaten eggs or egg yolks ensure a deeply coloured shine while milk or cream gives a matt golden colour. filo pastry: glaz