MU/DT !MUNE - Education Resources Information Center .MU/DT !MUNE. 95. Ili 013 103. Seymour, Lowell

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Transcript of MU/DT !MUNE - Education Resources Information Center .MU/DT !MUNE. 95. Ili 013 103. Seymour, Lowell

  • 110 096 135

    AUTHORTITLE

    INSTITUTION

    SPONS AGENCY

    PUB DATE.CONTRACTNOTE

    EDRS PRICEDESCRIPTORS

    IDENTIFIERS

    MU/DT !MUNE

    95 Ili 013 103

    Seymour, Lowell A.; And OthersInquiry Role Approach. Field Test Report(1972-73).Hid-Continent Regional, educational Lab., Inc., KanbasCity, Mo.National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington,D.C.1 Aug 73NE-C-00-3-0060129p.

    Ma-$0.75 HC-$6.60 PLUS POSTAGEBiology; *Curriculum Research; Educational Research;*Inquiry Training; Instruction; Science Education;Science ProgramsInquiry Role Approach; IRA; McREL; Mid ContinentRegional Educational Laboratory; Research Reports

    ABSTRACTThree domains of problems are the subject of this

    report: problems related to the nature of the Inquiry Role Approach(IRA) project implementation in field test classrooms, problemsrelated to student performance associated with different kinds ofextent of project implementation, and problems related to projectstudent performance within the project and as different fromcomparison groups of nonproject students. Data were gathered byinstruments sampling student perception of the existence of certainclassroom practices, activity log forms, and monitoring on-site McRelstaff. Data on project student performance were gathered by pre-,interim, and posttesting and activity feedback from teachers. Domainsmeasured were: (1) cognitive inquiry process skill, (2) attitude, (3)social skill and small group inquiry activity, and (4) subject mattercomprehension. IRA project students showed significant growth in alldostains Comparison nonproject students decreased over a year's timein measured cognitive inquiry skill and attitude while gainingslightly over IRA students in subject matter comprehension. (EE)

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  • INQUIRY ROLE APPROACH

    FIELD TEST REPORT

    (1972-73)

    August 1, 1973

    Lowell A. SeymourRichard M. BingmanPaul G. KoutnikLawrence F. Pddberg

    Larry L. HavlicekA. The! KocherKenneth A. Burton

    4rk

  • Now

    Do not reproduce in any way without the written permission of...

    Mid-continent Regional Educational Laboratory104 East Independence AvenueKansas City, Missouri 64106

    The work upon which this publication is based was performedpersuant to Contract No. NE-C-00-3-0068, with the National Instituteof Education, Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. Theopinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflectthe position or policy of the National Institute of Education and nooff-kW endorsement by the National Institute of Education shouldbe inferred.

  • $

    Special acknowledgment is riven to Dr. James Y. Chanfor his cooperation in the design and execution phasesof the study upon which this report is based; to Mrs.Karen Basey for editing sections of this report andIRA program materials; and to Mr. Michael Hagen forassistance in data processing.

  • Page

    I. SUMMARY 1

    II. CONTEXT 2

    Program's. Beginning (Needs Assessment)

    History of Inquiry Role Approach (IRA) Program 3

    III. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION 8

    IV. FIELD TEST 1972 -13 15

    Statement of Problem 15

    Objectives and Null Hypotheses 16

    Choosing Participants 21

    nescription of Participants 24,

    Procedures for Implementation 32

    Training & Followup 32

    On-site Visits 38

    Measuring Yrstruments - Teacher's Log 43V&P-C 43

    CAQ 44CFE 46BSBI 46

    EIB 1 and 2 48Social Skills Checklist 52Attitude Checklist 52Biology Content Test 53Understanding Role Responsibilities 53

    DAT 54

    Data Analysis & Interpretation 60

    Appendix (separate from report) 124

  • SUMMARYa.

    1110 Pursuant to a contract with the National Institute of Education, theMid-continent Regional Educational Laboratory has reported on its fieldtest of the Inquiry Role Approach project. The historical context of thisfield test is described so as to introduce the IRA project itself and givereason for a field test. Three domains of problems are the subject ofthis report, they are: Problems related to the nature of projectimplementation in field test classrooms (to what extent was the project-treatment-implemented as planned?); Problems related to student performanceassociated with different kinds of extents of project implementation; Problemsrelated to project student performance within the project and as differentfrom colparison groups of non-project students.

    Data related to extent of project implementation were gathered via instrumentssampling student perception of the existence,of certain classroom practices,activity-by-activity "log" .forms returned by project teachers, and monitoringon-site by McREL staff.

    Data on project student performance were gathered via pre, interim, and posttesting plus activity-by-activity feedback from project teachers. Pre andpost testing was carried out in comparison 'non-project classrooms. Thedomains of student performance measured were: 1) Cognitive inquiry processskill, 2) Attitude, 3) Social skill in small group inquiry activity, and4) Subject matter comprehension.

    Specific problems, objectives, and hypotheses which determined the collectionof data are described in detail as are the population sampled, the instrumentsused, the analyses performed and inferences drawn.

    The immediate results of data interpretation lead to specific IRA activitymaterials revisions and suggestions for further study. Specific interpretationsand conclusions from the various analyses lead to statements of some confidencethat the IRA project was installable to criterion requirements necessary tohave it be considered a treatment in this field test. IRA project studentsgrew significantly in cognitive inquiry skills and attitudes over 'the course ofa year's installation, IRA project students performed significantly higher oncognitive inquiry skill and attitude measures than did comparison non-projectstudents. Comparison non-project students decreased oveI4 a year's time inmeasured cognitive inquiry skill and attitude while gaining slightly over IRAproject students in subject matter comprehension. These findings areinterpreted in light of the characteristics of the instruments used anddifferences reported between the project and comparison populations.

  • 2

    CONTEXT

    PROGRAM'S BEGINNING(NEEDS ASSESSMENT)

    The Inquiry Role Approach (IRA) program was developed during a five-yearperiod (19681973) to meet the needs, as seen by some educators, formore participation by students in inquiry activities in which they couldassume more responsibility for their own learning. During the schoolyear. 1967-68, local Kansas City teachers who were teaching the BSCS*Biology Classes showed considerable interest in using activities thatwould change the role of students so that the students would become moreinvolved in planning and carrying out investigations for tenth gradebiology. 'During a survey of local high schools