MSC 154 Marine Photography Color Photography With Excerpts and examples from: Color Photography: A...

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Transcript of MSC 154 Marine Photography Color Photography With Excerpts and examples from: Color Photography: A...

  • Slide 1
  • MSC 154 Marine Photography Color Photography With Excerpts and examples from: Color Photography: A Working Manual Henry Horenstein, Little, Brown & Company, USA, 1995 Photography 9 th. Ed., London, Upton, Stone, Kobr, Brill, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2008
  • Slide 2
  • Photographing in Color More than 99 percent of all photographs taken are in color. More than 99 percent of all photographs taken are in color. At one time color photography was looked upon with skepticism by many creative and professional photographers. At one time color photography was looked upon with skepticism by many creative and professional photographers. Presently, black-and-white photographs are simply thought of as a regular picture with the color turned off. Presently, black-and-white photographs are simply thought of as a regular picture with the color turned off.
  • Slide 3
  • Photographing in color can sometimes produce unexpected results. Be aware of slight shifts in color balance resulting from: Be aware of slight shifts in color balance resulting from: Color shifts in daylight Color shifts from different types of light bulbs and or sources Color is a quality based on your: Color is a quality based on your: Subject The light falling on your subject The image you make from it
  • Slide 4
  • Characteristics of a Color Photograph Color Balance A films or a sensors response to the colors of a scene. The reproduction of colors in a color print, alterable during image editing or darkroom color printing. Color Balance A films or a sensors response to the colors of a scene. The reproduction of colors in a color print, alterable during image editing or darkroom color printing. White Balance The setting on a digital camera that adjusts the camera for the color temperature of a particular light source, such as tungsten or daylight.
  • Slide 5
  • Characteristics of a Color Photograph Saturation The purity or vividness, or intensity of a color is referred to as saturation. The color saturation that exists in front of the camera depends on the physical characteristics of objects in the scene and on the kind of illumination. Saturation The purity or vividness, or intensity of a color is referred to as saturation. The color saturation that exists in front of the camera depends on the physical characteristics of objects in the scene and on the kind of illumination. Saturation in the way colors are reproduced is also affected by the specific kind of sensor or film used to capture the image and the manner of post-processing film development, image editing, and printing.
  • Slide 6
  • Characteristics of a Color Photograph Contrast The difference in darkness or density between one tone and another. Two kinds of contrast are important in a photograph; both are strongly affected by the kind of illumination on the scene, but can also be altered by your technique. Contrast The difference in darkness or density between one tone and another. Two kinds of contrast are important in a photograph; both are strongly affected by the kind of illumination on the scene, but can also be altered by your technique. Overall (or global) contrast, sometimes called dynamic range, is the difference between the lightest and darkest parts of a scene, print, transparency, or negative.
  • Slide 7
  • Characteristics of a Color Photograph Local contrast is what makes photographs look crisp or soft, and has to do with the edges and transitions of color and tone. Affected by the quality of the lens and/or how clean the leans is. Affected by the kind of film (slower films have more contrast) or the sensor used. In very contrasty lighting, no film or digital sensor can record color and details simultaneously in very light highlights and very dark shadows. In very contrasty lighting, no film or digital sensor can record color and details simultaneously in very light highlights and very dark shadows. It is easier to get good exposures with color if lighting is soft or flat. It is easier to get good exposures with color if lighting is soft or flat.
  • Slide 8
  • Light: Part of the Electromagnetic Spectrum The human eye and most digital sensors and/or films will respond to wavelengths from about 400 nanometers to 700 nanometers. Most sensors and films are manufactured to respond to about the same range of wavelengths that the eye sees. But they can also respond to other wavelengths the eye cannot see, such as ultraviolet and infrared radiation.
  • Slide 9
  • Color: Additive or Subtractive All colors can be created by mixing three primary colors. All colors can be created by mixing three primary colors. Additive primaries (red, green, and blue) RGB used in television sets and computer monitors. RGB used in television sets and computer monitors. The additive process mixes red, green, & blue light in varying proportions to produce any color. The additive process mixes red, green, & blue light in varying proportions to produce any color. Mixed together at full strength, all three primaries produce white light. Mixed together at full strength, all three primaries produce white light. Additive mixing requires three separate light sources. Additive mixing requires three separate light sources. R G B
  • Slide 10
  • Color: Additive or Subtractive All colors can be created by mixing three primary colors. All colors can be created by mixing three primary colors. Subtractive primaries (cyan, magenta, and yellow) CMYK used in all modern color films, as well as in printing. CMYK used in all modern color films, as well as in printing. These colors absorb red, green, and blue wavelengths, thus subtracting them from white light. These colors absorb red, green, and blue wavelengths, thus subtracting them from white light. The subtractive primaries are the complementary colors to the three additive primaries. The subtractive primaries are the complementary colors to the three additive primaries. Mixed all together at full strength, the subtractive primaries absorb all colors of light, producing black (K). Mixed all together at full strength, the subtractive primaries absorb all colors of light, producing black (K). Mixed in varying proportions, they can produce any color in the spectrum. Mixed in varying proportions, they can produce any color in the spectrum. R G B
  • Slide 11
  • Color Photographs: Three Image Layers A color photograph begins as three superimposed black-and-white negatives. A color photograph begins as three superimposed black-and-white negatives. Color film consists of three layers of emulsion, with each layer basically the same as in B & W film, but responding to different parts of the spectrum. Color film consists of three layers of emulsion, with each layer basically the same as in B & W film, but responding to different parts of the spectrum. The top layer is only sensitive to blue light. The middle layer records the green light. The bottom layer is exposed only by red light. Colors are created during development. Colors are created during development. The developer converts the light-sensitive silver halides in the layers to metallic silver. As it does so, the developer oxidizes and combines with dye couplers that are either built into the layers of emulsion or added during development A color transparency, for example, has three layers of dye images superimposed on a transparent support. A color transparency, for example, has three layers of dye images superimposed on a transparent support.
  • Slide 12
  • Choosing A Color Film Different types and/or brands of color film vary in their color rendition, sharpness, contrast, graininess, and other characteristics. Different types and/or brands of color film vary in their color rendition, sharpness, contrast, graininess, and other characteristics. Negative films, also called print films. Produce an image that is opposite in colors and density of the original scene. Designed to be printed to create a positive image, usually on paper but occasionally on a clear film base for overheads, etc. Designed to be printed to create a positive image, usually on paper but occasionally on a clear film base for overheads, etc. Color negatives contain an overall orange mask which is formed during processing to help control color balance and contrast in printing. Color negatives contain an overall orange mask which is formed during processing to help control color balance and contrast in printing. Usually identified by the suffix color attached to the manufacturers name. Agfacolor, Ektacolor, Fujicolor, Kodacolor, etc. Agfacolor, Ektacolor, Fujicolor, Kodacolor, etc.
  • Slide 13
  • Choosing A Color Film Reversal films, also called transparency film. The film exposed in the camera is processed so that the negative image is reversed to make a positive transparency with the same colors and density as the scene. Designed to be projected or viewed directly and can also be printed or scanned. Designed to be projected or viewed directly and can also be printed or scanned. 35mm transparency films also are called slide films. 35mm transparency films also are called slide films. A slide is a transparency framed in cardboard or plastic mount. Generally identified by the suffix chrome attached to the manufacturers name. Agfachrome, Ektachrome, Fujichrome, Kodachrome, etc. Agfachrome, Ektachrome, Fujichrome, Kodachrome, etc.
  • Slide 14
  • Choosing A Color Film Professional films are designed for professional photographers, who often have exacting standards, especially for color balance. Professional