Mission Valley News - July 2014

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Transcript of Mission Valley News - July 2014

  • Program gives residents the tools to push for change

    San DiegoS moSt-uSeD trolley StopS

    See TROLLEY page 8See LEADERSHIP page 8

    New details on city bike sharing program revealed

    See DECOBIKE page 6

    AndrewKeattsVoice of San Diego

    O nly a few weeks remain before San Diego begins enforcing its new ordinance ban-ning motorhomes and other oversized vehicles from parking overnight on city streets without a permit. After finalizing some minor details at the end of June, city leaders expect the ordinance to formally take effect around Aug. 1. Residents will have a two-week grace period through Aug. 15 before police begin enforcing the law.

    JeremyOgulEditor, Mission Valley News

    Each vehicle will receive one warning before a ticket is issued.The ordinance defines an oversized vehicle as any vehicle that exceeds 27 feet in length and 7 feet in height, including any attached trail-ers or loads. The ordinance also covers any camping trailer, house car, boat, dune buggy, all-terrain vehicle (ATV) and other motorized or towed vehicles used primarily for recre-ational purposes.Residents will be allowed to get permits to park restricted vehicles on the street near their home for up to three consecutive nights.

    RV street parking enforcement begins in August

    See RV PARKING page 3

    T omasa Ruiz has lived in Linda Vista for nearly 30 years, but for most of that time her shy personality kept her from speaking up about the problems she saw in the neighborhood.

    That changed this year after she got involved in the Resident Leadership Academy, a program

    designed to teach and inspire residents to create positive change in their communities.

    The 10-week course, organized through Bayside Community Center, teaches participants how to organize grassroots networks and communicate with public officials and private entities to improve safety, physical activity and access to fresh, healthy foods in the neighborhood. The participants are then encouraged to take those new skills and practice them with real-world projects.

    We see the changes already, Ruiz said. A few sidewalks that we mentioned that needed repair they fixed it already.

    Participating in the Resident Leadership Academy has also sparked change in Ruizs life, helping her meet new people and speak more confidently.

    My kids are really proud of me, she said with a smile.

    Linda Vista has changed in many ways since Ruiz first immigrated

    San Diegos new bicycle sharing program is almost ready to roll, according to representatives from Decobike, the corporate sponsor of the citys program.

    Disagreements over the placement of bike docking stations contributed to a delay of more than six months, but nearly all issues have been resolved, and Decobike will begin installing the first stations downtown in early September.

    JeremyOgulEditor, Mission Valley News

    Jeremy OgulEditor, Mission Valley News

    People will be able to begin using the bikes by Oct. 30, and the six Mission Valley stations will be installed by the end of this year, said David Silverman, Decobikes executive representative for San Diego.

    Decobike has agreed to install 180 stations across the city, though the locations of approximately 20 percent of those stations are still being negotiated with property owners and neighborhood advocacy groups, Silverman said.

    In Mission Valley, bike docking stations have

    I ts an article of faith among many San Diegans that no one uses the trolley. The idea even made it into one of those annoying lists about San Diego your college roommate shares on Facebook.

    And yes, its true that just 3 percent of San Diego Countys workforce relies on any type of public transportation for their daily commute. (In Los Angeles its 11 percent, for comparison.)

    Resident Leadership Academy graduate Nadia Arambula and facilitator Jeanette Ruiz show off the new Linda Vista crosswalk for which resident leaders lobbied the city.

    July 11 - August 15 2014 On the Internet at www.MissionValleyNews.com Volume VIII Number 7

  • Civita Boulevard off Mission Center Road civitalife.com

    Civita is a master plan development of Quarry Falls, LLC. All information is accurate as of date of publication, but information and pricing is subject to change at any time.

    A place where life is good, homes are tasty, trees are everywhere and walking is fun. So throw him a bone and check out the very cool park, dog run, and neighborhoods here at Civita.

    Townhomes | Rowhomes | Single-Family Homes Luxury Apartments | Single-Level Condos

    Hewants whatyouwant.

    Hewants whatyouwant.youwant.you

    Applicants race to obtain highly coveted medical marijuana cooperative permits

    See APPLICANTS page 12

    The applications to open med-ical marijuana consumer co-operatives in the Mission Valley, Grantville and Morena areas have begun piling up in city of-fices since the end of April, when the city began accepting them.

    The city has so far received at least three full applications for permits in Grantville, one in Mission Valley and one in the Morena neighborhood.

    In Grantville, Merhdad Ban-ki has applied for a permit at 5959 Mission Gorge Rd. Ron Miller and Nick Hosig have ap-plied for a permit at 4410 Gla-cier Avenue. Cynthia Morgan is the contact on an application at 4365-4375 Twain Ave.

    In Mission Valley, an appli-cation has been filed for 3455 Camino Del Rio South. The ap-plication lists Sara Cadenas as the contact. The building is cur-rently occupied by a dispensary that has been operating without a permit.

    In Morena, an individual rep-resented by construction consul-tant Michael Rollins has applied for a permit at 1028 Buenos Ave., just west of West Morena

    JeremyOgulMission Valley News

    Boulevard. For the applicants, its a race

    to the finish line. The city ordi-nance limits each City Council district to four medical marijua-na cooperative permits, and all cooperatives must be separated by at least a 1,000-foot radius.

    It appears that two of the ap-plicants in Grantville one on Twain Avenue and one on Mis-sion Gorge Road may be less than 1,000 feet apart. The appli-

    cant on Glacier Avenue is more than 1,000 feet from the other two Grantville applicants.

    Unlike the applications in Grantville and Mission Valley, which are in Council District 7, the applicant on Buenos Avenue in the Morena area falls within City Council District 2, which has received a large number of applications for dispensaries in the Midway area.

    While city staff complete the months-long process of review-ing the applications to determine whether they meet the criteria, the applicants have begun to plead their cases before the com-munity planning groups. The community planning groups do not have veto power over the ap-plications, but they do have the authority to make recommenda-tions to the citys Hearing Of-ficer and to the Planning Com-

    mission, which has the final say if someone appeals the Hearing Officers decision.

    Nick Hosig and Ron Miller the applicants at Glacier Avenue in Grantville have spoken at two separate meetings of the Na-vajo Community Planners, the community planning group that oversees the Grantville area.

    They told the group on April 21 that the cooperative would be known as Grantville Greens and would focus on providing alternative medicine for pa-

    tients with cancer and other se-vere conditions. They said they were motivated by the memory of family members stricken with cancer who struggled with the side effects from more tradition-al pharmaceutical treatments. They also said the cooperative would limit the number of mem-bers in favor of providing a high level of care for a limited num-

    We are your eyes and ears. Thats why we want to hear your opinion on this.- Matt Adams, Navajo Community Planners

    An unpermitted medical marijuana dispensary is already operating out of a building at 3455 Camino Del Rio South. An applicant has applied for a permit to legally operate a cooperative there.

    2 MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014LOCAL NEWS

  • night permit will cost $2 and can be obtained through on online system. Residents are allowed up to 72 one-night permits in a year.

    On a recent Friday afternoon, a motorhome sat in front of the Allied Gardens home of Dave Holston. Its usually parked in the desert, where the cost of a parking spot is a bit cheaper than in town, but Holston had it on the street for maintenance and repairs.

    Holston said he does not antici-pate too much of an inconvenience because his mo-torhome can fit in the driveway on occasions when he needs to park it in town for more than three nights.

    A few doors down the street, one of his neigh-bors was cleaning out a trailer parked on the street.

    I dont like it, said the neigh-bor, a man named Mike who de-clined to give his last name out of concern for retribution. Im opposed to it. Theyre taking more freedoms away.

    The new ordinance will prob-ably force him to sell the vehicle since private parking is so ex-pensive, he said.

    Unlike other parking ordi-nances, which are handled by parking enforcement officers,

    this one will be enforced by po-lice investigative service officers as well as regular patrol officers, because they are the only ones available to work between 2 and 6 a.m., said police chief Shelley Zimmerman.

    One piece of unfinished busi-ness is the lack of an alternative for low-income residents who

    live in their RVs. City Council President Todd Gloria has asked the mayors office to work with the citys Real Estate Assets De-partment to identify unused city property that could be used as a refuge for.

    I think there may be unin-tended consequences if we dont find a solution, Gloria said.

    The ordinance is considered a two-year pilot program. After two years, the city council will have to renew the ordinance if they want it to continue.

    RV Parking, from page 1

    Relay for Life raises money to battle cancerR elay for Life of Mission Valley, hosted at Civita, raised $6,200 to support cancer research and treatment through the Ameri-can Cancer Society on June 21-22.

    For 24 hours straight, volunteers camped out together and walked laps as individuals or as part of teams. They also held a Luminaria Ceremony dedicated to family and friends who died of cancer-related illness. The winning team, ATGSD FCPOA Cancer Punchers of the Navy Petty Officers Association, raised $1,940.

    We were delighted to see the community of Mission Valley come together to help finish the fight against cancer, said Julie Bartlett, a representative of the American Cancer Society, in a written state-ment. This was a great first step. Were looking forward to see this event grow as Civita matures.

    History lovers and city lead-ers will celebrate the history of the Presidio on July 13 at the third annual open house of the Junipero Serra Museum in Pre-sidio Park from 4 to 6 p.m.

    The theme of the free celebra-tion, organized by the San Diego History Center, is Life at the Presidio. Histo-rian and author Rudy Shapee will give visitors an idea of what life was like for soldiers at the Presidio under Spanish rule in a lecture titled Feeding a Gar-rison: Daily Life in San Diegos Military Out-post. The event will also feature remarks from City Council President Todd Gloria, a musket-fired salute, live music, games, crafts and re-freshments.

    Spanish explorers affiliated

    Junipero Serra Museum opens doors for annual celebration

    with Gaspar de Portola, includ-ing Father Junipero Serra, planted a cross in 1769 on what is today known as Presidio Hill. Spain in 1774 designated the spot as a Royal Spanish Pre-sidio. George W. Marston and other San Diegans commemo-rated that event 160 years later

    with the establishment of the Junipero Serra Museum, which spawned the San Diego Histori-cal Society.

    MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014 3LOCAL NEWS

    Presidio Park by Jim Epler / Creative Commons

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    Last season, the Chargers put together an offensive machine that was ranked fifth total in the NFL. Philip Rivers had a comeback player of the year kind of season as the second highest rated quarterback in the league who finished first in completion percentage, fifth in passing yards and fourth in touchdown passes. Rivers was complemented by a breakout season from third round pick rookie wide out, Keenan Allen, and a rushing attack compiled of Ryan Mathews, Danny Woodhead and Ronnie Brown.

    After a successful 2014 draft and some offseason moves in free agency, the Chargers face the fourth most difficult schedule in the NFL. They will host and visit teams from the NFC West this season which includes a visit from the defending Super Bowl champion Seattle Seahawks.

    With the addition of first round draft pick Jason Verrett and recently acquired Pro Bowl defensive back Brandon Flowers, the Chargers secondary looks to improve vastly compared to last years squad, which had the 29th ranked passing defense.

    Veteran pass rusher Dwight Freeney looks to help steer a promising pass rush after his injury from week four of last season

    kept him from contributing to his full potential. Also lining up with Freeney is a healthy Melvin Ingram, Donald Butler and second round draft choice Jeremiah Attaochu.

    Gone and off to head coach Tennessee is former offensive coordinator Ken Whisenhunt. Last season, Whisenhunt was credited (along with Mike McCoy) for helping Philip Rivers perform remarkably in what was a renaissance season for him. Quarterbacks coach Frank Reich takes over as the new offensive coordinator and with his strategy in the fold, the Chargers are developing a no-huddle, hurry-up style offense that will be sure to keep pace with offenses like the Denver Broncos and New England

    Patriots.The Chargers this season are

    healthier than they were six months ago. Malcom Floyd returns healthy after months of rehab and recovery from a devastating neck injury that he sustained during a week two matchup against Philadelphia last season. Ryan Mathews battled a nagging foot and ankle injury late last season but he returns healthy and determined to have another impact season. One returning player who has great upside is 2013 draft pick Steve Williams who unfortunately tore his pectoral muscle in a preseason game and had to miss all of 2013. His untapped potential at cornerback will prove crucial to the secondary and defense as a whole.

    The 2014 season might look tough on paper but the keys to success lie partly with the 2014 draft class, and these guys look to make an impact this year. Last season it was draftees

    Keenan Allen and D.J. Fluker who both played above and beyond what they were asked of.

    The rookies to watch this season are Verrett, Attaochu and Reese.

    Verrett might be seen as undersized by critics at 5 feet, 9 inches, but his knack for explosive tackling and his great jumping ability will contribute greatly this season, especially with Brandon Flowers there to mentor him.

    Attaochu comes from Georgia Tech as the all-time leader in sacks and the Nigerian Nightmare is going to be a stud in John Paganos 3-4 defense. His pairing with Melvin Ingram will be a force in the division.

    Tevin Reese is a sleeper to be

    one of the most productive rookies in the NFL. In his four years as the deep threat receiver for Baylor, 22 of Reeses 29 total touchdowns went for 40 yards or more.

    While these rookies will certainly contribute, all eyes will be on the phenomenally

    talented Ladarius Green. Green is a third-year tight end from the University of Louisiana at Lafayette who is going to become a star and huge part of the offense. At 6 feet, 6 inches tall, Green has the size of Calvin Johnson and the surprising speed of Vernon Davis. Hes a freak of an athlete who will likely become the number one tight end over the hall-of-fame worthy Antonio Gates in a year or two. There will be a two tight end scheme with both Green and Gates causing opposing defenses trouble and in it certainly isnt uncommon for teams to incorporate this style of play in a pass first league.

    The Chargers are truly contenders to make it into the postseason for a consecutive season and while a Super Bowl championship run remains to be seen, what isnt in question is the leadership of Rivers, its other veterans and the coaching staff. If the Chargers can both start and end the season strong, a 10-win season might be brewing.

    The rookies to watch this season are Verrett, Attaochu and Reese.

    4 MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014LOCAL NEWSCHARGERS: What to expect at The Q this seasonChrisMadafferMission Valley News

  • set by the state government to prevent city-by-city inconsis-tencies in labor costs, Sanders said.

    Mickey Kasparian, head of the San Diego and Imperial Counties Labor Council, said the conversation should be about improving the lives of workers, many of whom can-not afford to take care of their

    families despite working 40 or more hours a week on mini-mum wage.

    This is not a luxury, he said. This is a necessity.

    He pointed to Washington State, which has the highest statewide minimum wage in the U.S. at $9.32 an hour.

    They have the fastest grow-ing economy in our country, he said. They have created thou-sands of jobs.

    The proposal appears to have the support of the councils Democratic majority, while Re-publican councilmembers, in-cluding District 7s Scott Sher-man, are generally against the proposal.

    Sherman said raising the minimum wage is not the right way to address poverty.

    The minimum wage is sup-posed to protect entry-level workers, Sherman said. Youre supposed to learn a couple of skills and move up the economic ladder.

    LOCAL NEWS

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    Small businesses, workers debate local minimum wage hike

    The minimum wage in San Diego could reach $11.50 an hour within 30 months under an ordinance currently under review at the city council.

    The proposal by City Council President Todd Gloria would bump the local minimum wage up to $9.75 an hour beginning Jan. 1, 2015. In 2016, it would rise again to $10.50 an hour, and in 2017 it would reach $11.50 an hour. The minimum wage would then automatically be adjusted according to in-creases in the Consumer Price Index.

    Local small-business own-ers say the proposal threatens their ability to do business in San Diego. Employers already have to adjust to increases in the state minimum wage, which rises 12.5 percent to $9 an hour this July 1 and then to $10 an hour in July 2015.

    While big corporations like Wal-Mart and Target can ab-sorb increases in the cost of labor, further increases would be a dagger to the heart of the small businesses that employ fewer than a dozen people, said Mark Arabo, president of the Neighborhood Market Associa-tion. The group represents li-quor stores, convenience stores and independent grocers, such as Keils Market in San Carlos.

    These kinds of small busi-nesses operate 3 to 4 percent profit margins and dont have big bank accounts they can dip into to cushion the blow of an increase in the cost of labor, Arabo said.

    To survive a minimum wage increase, they will have to cut employee hours, increase their workloads and raise prices on consumers, he said.

    Providers of in-home senior care have also condemned the proposal to increase the citys

    minimum wage, arguing that it will increase the cost of in-home caregivers and force many senior citizens to leave their homes and move into as-sisted living facilities.

    Its a bad move for our se-niors, said Leslie Bojorquez, owner of a company that pro-vides in-home care for seniors in San Carlos, Del Cerro, La Mesa and the surrounding communities.

    The caregiv-ers Bojorquez employs al-ready earn more than m i n i m u m wage, but if the minimum goes up, she would have to raise pay ac-cordingly to ensure she attracts well-qualified em-ployees, she said.

    Glorias initial proposal to in-crease the minimum was more drastic. It would have reached $13.09 per hour by July 2017. He revised the plan in mid-June so it would only reach $11.50 by 2017.

    This is a modest proposal, Gloria said. Other cities have done this. It is not a unicorn. It does exist in nature.

    Nonetheless, modifying the proposal changed few if any minds were changed in the business community.

    Increasing the minimum wage above and beyond what the state has already man-dated would put San Diego at a competitive disadvantage compared to nearby cities that have a lower minimum wage, said Jerry Sanders, CEO of the San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce.

    The chambers position is that the minimum wage should be left to the federal govern-ment to ensure a level playing field, and at worst it should be

    MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014 5

  • Bordelet insists that the terroir, not the technique, is what truly distinguishes his ciders from others. Terroir is key when speaking about any great wine, and is no less important to ciders. His familys 200-300 year old apple and pear trees are situated on schist and granite bedrock with clay soil that gives the fruit their individual flavor. He farms his orchards

    organically and biodynamically to produce the best fruit possible. He admits his experience with wine is vital to his cider endeavor. He attempts to make ciders with

    depth, length and nuance. His goal is to achieve aromatic complexity, distinction between vintages and stability for the cider to age, which is every winemakers goal.

    Bordelets Sidre Tendre has a closer comparison to fine wine than to beer and has limitless pairing potential. Sidre Tendre is elegant and crisp; with intense apple flavors and a delicate mousse with a slightly sweet yet restrained finish. It could easily replace Champagne for a celebratory meal at a fraction of the cost for only $12 a bottle. It is remarkable as an aperitif and enhances cream-based sauces, white meats as well as many cheeses. Sidre Tendre is a versatile cider of exceptional character and refinement and is perfect for cider fans and wine drinkers alike.

    French cider the new Champagne?

    Certified

    KarenIrizarry

    Sommelier

    DecoBike, from page 1

    been planned for the following locations: Hazard Center Drive just south of the Hazard Center shopping center Mission Center Road just south of Camino de la Reina (outside the West Elm store) Camino de la Reina just west of Camino del Este (outside Staples) Rio San Diego Drive just west of Qualcomm WayFenton Parkway next to the Mission Valley library branch Rio San Diego Drive just west of the Interstate 805 bridge Three bike docking stations will be placed in Old Town, including one at the Old Town Transportation Center.

    A unique business modelDecobike recently announced

    the pricing structure for bike users. Compared to bike sharing programs in other cities, the program in San Diego is noticeably more expensive.

    Most bike sharing programs follow the same general pricing structure: Users pay an access fee daily, monthly or annually that allows them to freely remove a bike from the station for up to 30 minutes at a time. If the bike is not returned to a station within 30 minutes, the user must also pay an overage fee, which is usually charged in 30-minute increments.

    The daily access fee in San Diego will be $15. By comparison, the daily access fee in New York City is $10; in Austin, Texas it is $8; in Washington, D.C., it is $7; in Minneapolis, it is $6 and in Tel Aviv, Israel, it is $5.

    The overage fee in San Diego will be $5. In contrast, the overage fee in New York City and Austin, Texas, is $4; in Washington, D.C. it is $2; in Minneapolis and Tel Aviv it is $1.50.

    Thus, a user who buys a one-day pass for San Diegos Decobike and takes 32 minutes to return the bike to a docking station would be charged $15 for the pass plus a $5 overage fee, for a total of $20. The same situation in New York City would cost the user $14; in Austin, Texas, it would cost $12; in Washington, D.C. it would cost $9; in Minneapolis it would cost $7.50 and in Tel Aviv it would cost $6.50.

    The annual membership is similarly more expensive in San Diego than in other cities: $125 (the first 1,500 members will pay only $99). In New York City, the annual

    membership is $95; in Austin, Texas, it is $85; in Washington, D.C., it is $75; in Minneapolis, it is $65 and in Tel Aviv it is $70.

    Though San Diegos prices stand out compared to other cities, they are not particularly surprising considering that San Diegos program will be entirely funded by user revenues, said Matthew Christensen, survey researcher with the Transportation Sustainability Research Center at the University of California, Berkeley.

    Subsidies from local governments in other cities allow their programs to offer artificially low prices compared to San Diegos Decobike, Christensen said.

    New York City is the only other city with a bike sharing program that operates entirely on private funding. New York Citys prices are lower than San Diegos thanks to a $41 million sponsorship deal with Citibike, but the program there is still struggling to stay in the black and is now seeking to change its pricing structure, Christensen said.

    Bike sharing is such a nascent industry that were quickly learning how to create an effective business model, he said. A lot of these systems cant be self-sufficient with an annual membership priced under $100 a year.

    Another factor that makes San Diegos system pricier is that it will operate year-round, whereas programs in cities such as Minneapolis cost less in the winter because no one is using the bicycles in below-freezing temperatures, according to David Silverman, the Decobike representative.

    One thing makes San Diegos pricing scheme unique, though: the availability of flat rate rentals. Rather than buying a one-day membership, users can pay $5 to take out a bike for 30 minutes, $7 to take out a bike for one hour or $12 to take out a bike for two hours. For users who pay the flat rate, there is no overage fee as long as the bike is returned within the allotted time period.

    Decobike has installed bike-sharing programs in three Florida cities where this flat rate option has been proven to be very successful and heavily utilized, Silverman said.

    In exchange for making Decobike the official bikesharing partner of the city, Decobike will pay the city a portion of its profits a minimum of $1 million over the next 10 years.

    Location is keyUnlike Mission Valley and Old

    Town, nearby Linda Vista will not host any of the 180 bike docking stations, nor will any neighborhood east of 30th Street.

    Some have criticized Decobike and the city for passing over lower-income nieghborhoods such as City Heights and Linda Vista, where residents generally have a greater need for alternative forms of transportation. Since the city is giving up public land in many cases to provide space for the bike sharing stations, the system should benefit residents, said Sam Ollinger, executive director of BikeSD, a nonprofit bicycle advocacy organization.

    Ollinger noted that many of the stations are being placed in parts of the city with little to no bicycle infrastructure, such as striped bike lanes or separated bike paths. In New York City, Salt Lake City and Washington, D.C., much of the street infrastructure was in place when the bike sharing systems launched, she said.

    Given the publicized opposition to the placement of the bike share hubs and now a fairly original pricing model, Im very curious to see how this pans out, Ollinger said.

    There is certainly plenty of room to expand. Matthew Christensen, the UC Berkeley transportation researcher, said that while San Diegos 1,800 bicycles will make it one of the largest programs in the country, it will still only meet a small amount of demand.

    A city like San Diego could potentially use close to 10,000 bikes, Christensen said.

    That will be difficult, however, without funding from the city, because bike stations in less populous and lower income areas are less profitable, he said.

    How will you be celebrating your summer? Chances are youll be spending some time around the grill, and with temperatures heating up its the perfect time for a cold cider. Anyone who thinks cider is just apple juice probably hasnt tried French cider. French cider can rival wine in subtlety and complexity. Its where cider can become fine wine.

    What sets French cider apart from its Spanish, British and even American counterparts? There are multiple contributing factors, one being its climate. French cider is not just

    cider, but a beautifully balanced drink that can be described as the champagne of apples. While Champagne, among other regions, make wine, Normandy and Brittany are perfect for quality cider. Their cooler climates proved difficult for grape production but ideal for apples and pears.

    The other contributing factor is the method. There is often more pronounced complexity in French cider due to the fermentation process. The sweetness is typically balanced with a hefty tannin and acid due to the range of apple varieties used. While American ciders tend to be super sweet or bright and tart, French ciders often have more subtle and rounded flavors. A perfect example is Sidre Tendre by Eric Bordelet.

    And what sets Sidre Tendre apart from the rest? It has to be the cider-maker. Eric Bordelet was a well-known sommelier who trained in some of Paris top restaurants. When Bordelet decided to leave Paris to tend to the family orchards in Normandy, he first studied oenology in Burgundy to learn the winemaking process. Afterwards, he worked under Didier Dageneau, a legendary winemaker from the Loire Valley in France. Bordelet approaches cider with a wine mentality. Its no surprise that Bordelet produces an incredible cider.

    6 MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014DINING & DRINK

  • second dog park he has installed in a Westfield Mall. Formerly the Experience Coordinator at the Westfield UTC in La Jolla, Matzek oversaw a redevelopment project that installed a dog park for the pet owners who would walk their dogs through the area.

    It was a definite success and we really saw usage improve over the years, said Matzek. The Mission Valley mall hopes that this new attraction will be both a reward for their regular customers who bring dogs, as well as provide a community asset and potential attraction for new customers.

    The dog park grand opening will take place from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on July 17, and dogs of all sizes will be able to use the space.

    The San Diego Humane Society has events planned for the parks first six weeks:

    July 26 Leash your fitness: Learn how much fun it can be to exercise with your dog

    Aug. 2 Doggie Caf: Socialize and play games with other dog lovers and their dogs

    Aug. 9 Loose leash walking: San Diego Humane Society Trainer Angie Fonseca will lead a loose leash walking workshop and spend an hour answering questions about dog training

    Aug. 16 Free photos at the photo booth from 1 to 4 p.m.

    Aug. 23 Microchip your dog for $10

    Aug. 30 Mobile adoption event

    Ever since a 2011 study revealed that there were more American households with dogs than with children, there has been a huge surge in the development of resources and spaces for families and their pets. Dog parks are currently the fastest-growing urban parks in the United States, and Americas Finest City is no exception. San Diegos newest dog park is set for its grand opening on July 17 in the Westfield Mission Valley mall.

    Set in the heart of the urban shopping center on the south side of Macys, this 300 square-foot enclosed space was designed as a community asset where locals can bring their dogs to play off leash. The idea came from Brandon Matzek, Westfield Mission Valleys marketing manager, who recognized that the space formerly dedicated to planters would be a great space for a small dog park.

    We see people come here with their dogs all the time, said Matzek. It seemed like a natural fit to provide a nice amenity for people who already love to come here. After waiting for the budget to align, designing and planning took one month to complete and construction was completed in only three weeks. The enclosed space features Pedigree synthetic turf, benches, an

    Dog park opens at Westfield Mission Valley

    automatic watering station and three large trees.

    Though a seemingly simple concept, pet experts and community planners claim that dog parks actually bring up a very complicated set of both pros and cons. For monthly pet columnist and owner of Mission Valley Pet Sitting Services, Sari Reis, dog parks are met with mixed emotions.

    With safety being the main concern, Reis explains that dog

    parks are much more complicated than they may seem.

    The most important thing from my perspective is that the only dogs taken to dog parks are well socialized and can be counted on to behave well around both other dogs and their owners, said Reis.

    The pet sitting company owner is no stranger to what can happened when dogs are put into social settings they are not ready for, after two of her own animals were badly

    bitten by others at dog parks. Reis believes that if owners are responsible and exercise proper discernment, dog parks can be a great way for animals in urban settings to spend time outdoors without a leash.

    Dog parks also bring a number of other benefits that can lead to healthy lives for pets, such as socializing in peer group. For trained, well-behaved dogs, peer group socialization is a key component for keeping animals active and happy.

    Though the Westfield Mission Valley dog park features a minimalistic design, there are also a number of potential upgrades that the park may want to consider depending on how popular the mall park becomes. Creating a

    double-entry barrier to the park through two separate gates has proven effective in minimizing the threat of off leash dogs running away from their owners, which can be especially dangerous for dog parks near busy roads or parking lots.

    Despite the debate between the pros and cons of dog parks, one thing that is certain is that they are certainly on the rise. For Matzek, this is the

    MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014 7LOCAL NEWS

    KatelynMonteroMission Valley News

  • But San Diegos a big place, so even a small share of transit users still represents a lot of people. Altogether, the three trolley lines provide an average of 125,000 rides per day.

    If youd ride the trolley, you could see that its simply not the case that no one uses the trolley, said Metropolitan Transit System spokesman Rob Schupp.

    The trolley isnt widely used citywide, which contributes to the perception that no one uses it. But there are neighborhoods where people use it regularly.

    The systems busiest line, the blue line, runs from San Ysidro through the South Bay and into downtown. The green line brings riders from Santee through Mission Valley and into downtown, and the orange line begins downtown and goes through the southeastern neighborhoods before ending in El Cajon.

    Were taking a closer look at the trolley and other public transportation in the region and where it could be improved to better understand big debates about San Diegos future. Do transit investments drive the construction of affordable housing nearby? Do dense populations use public transit more frequently? Is the public transit system giving residents a legitimate alternative to driving?

    As a starting point, weve used data derived from MTSs new automated passenger counting system, which keeps track of every rider who gets on or off a train. Weve used the daily averages from four months this spring to identify the most active stations on the systems three trolley lines.

    Its a broad measure that shows which parts of the city see a lot of trolley usage.

    You could say this is where the system is engaging deeply with life and activity, and where the system is having a bigger effect on these neighborhoods, in a comparative framework of the rest of San Diego, said Brian Taylor, director of the Institute for Transportation Studies at UCLA.

    In neighborhoods like Encanto, San Ysidro, Lemon Grove and parts of Chula Vista, data show there are plenty of people who make regular use of the trolley.

    Overall activity isnt a perfect measure, however. It doesnt tell us how riders got to the stationwhether they walked, drove or took a bus there. And it counts transfers between lines as essentially separate trips.

    That means stations with multiple lines show huge activity, even though some of it is from people transferring from one train to another, not coming from or going to anything in the neighborhood.

    Four of the five busiest stations are transit centers where people transfer between lines. The station at 12th and Imperial, in East Village near Petco Park, is the only one with stops on all three lines and is

    by far the systems most active with more than 34,000 people getting on and off trains there each day, nearly double the next closest station.

    But the second most active station in the whole system is the blue lines stop in San Ysidro at the Mexican border. There are 17,000 trips beginning or ending there daily, including 10,000 riders that start their their trolley ride there every day. That heavy supply of riders is a big part of why the blue line is the most successful one in the city.

    Other stations on the blue line, Iris Avenue in Otay Mesa and Palomar Street in Chula Vista, are also among the systems most active single-line stops.

    The four least-active stations in the entire trolley system, meanwhile,

    are all on the green line.Qualcomm Stadium is useful for

    most people only on event days, and saw an average of 510 rides each day. Gillespie Field in El Cajon wasnt much better, with an average of 656 trips each day. The Middletown Station, which is near the airport but offers no useful way to get to actually get there, has 724 ons-and-offs each day and Mission San Diego in Mission Valley, just one stop east of Qualcomm, had an average of 898 beginning or ending trips.

    Taylor, though, said any high-functioning and well-designed transit system will naturally have some stops that dont see as much activity.

    If you only have high-volume stops, you have an incomplete network, he said. There are reasons that some people cant drive even if they want, and need transit, and you need a system that gives that broad level of coverage.

    Low volume at a station might be a good reason not to invest in amenities or other expensive work at the station, he said, but it isnt on its own an argument to remove any station.

    But, Taylor said, if a string of stops is underperforming, as opposed to a single station, its not unnatural for a transit agency to consolidate those stops to make the rest of the line faster.

    Contact Voice of San Diego reporter Andrew Keatts by phone at (619) 325-0529 or by email at [email protected]

    Trolley, from page 1

    from her native Guerrero, Mexico. A surge of gang violence in the 1990s came and went. The parks have been cleaned up. Police spend more time patrolling the streets.

    At the same time, many problems have lingered, especially those that affect the walkability and safety of the neighborhood. Sign posts in the middle of sidewalks, curbs that are unfriendly to baby stroller wheels, missing crosswalks, not enough street lights these are the kinds of issues that Ruiz and other graduates of the Resident Leadership Academy have decided to focus on.

    Staff members from Bayside Community Center have been asking for a crosswalk at an intersection in front of the community centers building for years, but it was not until the graduates of the Resident Leadership Academy got together and lobbied the city for the crosswalk that it was finally installed, said Rose Ceballos, the centers director of social services.

    City leaders are more inclined to listen when they hear a chorus rather than a single voice, Ceballos said.

    To try to get changes made, I believe it really takes the community, she said.

    City Councilmember Scott Sherman has gotten to know the Resident Leadership Academy folks well over the past several months. Theyve helped his office with the nuts and bolts issues on the ground in the neighborhood, he said.

    Its gratifying to know that with

    our help and their help that were actually making a difference in the community, Sherman said. People are starting to notice.

    Among those who have noticed is Anali Rosales, a 24-year-old Linda Vista resident who got involved in the RLA program after seeing the little victories earlier participants had achieved. Before taking the RLA classes, Rosales said she did not know where to go or who to talk to. Now she and her fellow community members have established relationships with Sherman, representatives from the mayors office and other key contacts in city government.

    One of the top priorities for the graduates of the Resident Leadership Academy now is getting better lighting at parks in the neighborhood, especially Kelly Park, which sits at the end of a cul de sac at the bottom of a hill. The seclusion of the park

    attracts criminals, residents say, and they hope installing lighting will deter criminal activity at night.

    Jeanette Ruiz, who led the first two Resident Leadership Academies as a staff member at Bayside, said she is thrilled to see the community take initiative and engage with local government.

    I believe that people shouldnt just sit and complain, Ruiz said.

    Change is possible when the citizens come together and communicate effectively through the right channels, she said.

    Everybody in District 7 needs sidewalks, but its the way you go about things. she said.

    Ruiz recently accepted a new job with the county of San Diego, which provides funding for RLAs in communities across the region. While leaving is bittersweet, Ruiz said she is confident that leaders trained through the program will continue to push to make Linda Vista a better place to live for all its residents.

    One RLA graduate, Guadalupe Flores, has already been appointed to the board of the Linda Vista Planning Group, which reviews development in the community and makes recommendations to the Planning Commission and City Council. Another graduate of the program will soon join the board of the Linda Vista Recreation Council.

    Residents interested in learning more about the Resident Leadership Academy can contact Bayside Community Center at (858) 278-0771.

    Leadership, from page 1

    Change is possible when the citizens come together and communicate effectively through the right channels.

    Though it serves thousands of riders on Chargers game days, the trolley stop at Qualcomm Stadium is the least-used stop in the system, with an average of just 510 rides a day, according to MTS data.

    Voices for Children is looking for volunteers who can dedicate 10-15 hours a month for 18 months as a Court Appointed Special Advocate for children in foster care.

    CASA volunteers spend time with abused and neglected children as they navigate the Juvenile Court system. The volunteer becomes one of the few consistent adult presences in the childs life during this trying time. When social workers and attorneys are overburdened with large caseloads, the court relies on the CASA volunteer to serve as the courts eyes and ears in the life of a foster child.

    CASA volunteers do not need to have any experience in law or education. Many of the volunteers work full-time, work from home or are retired. Voices for Children provides a 35-hour comprehensive training program, and CASAs are

    further supported by a full-time professional advocacy supervisor.

    Several information sessions for interested volunteers are coming soon in the Kearny Mesa area: Monday, July 21 from 6 to 7:30 p.m; Saturday, July 26 from 10 to 11:30 a.m.; Saturday, Aug. 9 from 10 to 11:30 a.m.; and Wednesday, Aug. 13 from noon to 1:30 p.m.

    For more information, visit www.speakupnow.org/information-sessions, email [email protected] or call (858) 598-2230.

    8 MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014LOCAL NEWS

    Volunteers needed to help foster children

  • Kelly

    ACSM-HFS, CHESOstrem

    Fitness Expert

    E very day people across the country pick up a bag of groceries, play with a child, sit at desks and drive cars. These are all normal activities of daily life, and they are much harder to do when suffering from back pain.

    Four out of five Americans experience low back pain at some point in their life. Theres a simple way to prevent or decrease this pain: strengthen the core.

    What is the core? Its the bridge between your upper and lower body. It helps your arms and legs function well. It helps you stand, sit, reach, twist and so much more. Nearly every action your body can do requires the core.

    The major muscles of the core include the abdominals (thats the six-pack muscles), obliques (sides), transverse abdominis (deep muscle that wraps around the body under the abdominals) and erector spinae (back muscles along the spine).

    These muscles all work together to help stabilize us and maintain our balance, which then helps us move in every direction and prevents us from falling or otherwise injuring ourselves. Doing regular exercises to build the cores strength is essential to maintaining good back health and continuing normal activities of daily life.

    There are many ways to improve your core strength. The key is to look for a good mix of exercises. While people often think doing endless amounts of crunches is the answer, its important to diversify your exercises and strengthen all the core muscles. Too much focus on one area (like the abdominals) can lead to imbalances (in the back) and cause more injury (which is what were trying to prevent).

    Training the core can be done at home or anywhere you can find a little space. You dont need fancy equipment to do good, basic exercises. Some of the best core exercises just require your own body weight.

    If you are looking for more direction or expertise, working with a personal trainer can do wonders. A good trainer can cater a workout to your specific needs and help you track your progress toward your

    goals. Or, look for exercise classes and workout videos dedicated solely to the core. Pilates and yoga are excellent for building core strength. Hazard Center YMCAs Posture Performance is a wonderful class that challenges the core and builds strength through functional movements.

    However you choose to do it, make it your goal to build a strong core. Your back and your life will be better for it!

    Here are two general exercises that will help improve your core strength and move more functionally every day. All you need is a small area of floor (use a carpet or mat if you want a little cushion) and a few minutes of time!

    Bridge Lift

    Lay on your back on the floor or a mat. Bend your knees, keeping your feet flat on the floor and hip-width apart. Engage your abdominals and glutes throughout the exercise. Exhale, lifting your hips off the ground until your body is in a straight line from knees to shoulders. Hold this position for a few seconds, then inhale as you release your hips back to the floor. Pay special attention to make sure you keep your weight on your shoulders (not on your neck!) and dont push your hips up too far and hyper-extend your back. To make this exercise more challenging, hold the position for longer before releasing back to the floor.

    Plank

    Lay on your stomach on the floor or a mat. Position your elbows close to your sides. Flex your feet, moving your toes toward your shins and push up onto your forearms with your elbows positioned directly below your shoulders. Keep your core engaged and tight like a corset throughout the exercise. Your body should be in a straight line, parallel to the floor, from your head to your heels. Make sure to keep your hips in line so they dont drop down or rise up. Hold this position for 15 seconds then lower back to the floor and relax. Make it harder by holding the position for longer and longer each time, working toward 60 seconds and longer. To make it easier, push up from the floor onto your forearms leaving your knees on the ground. Hold the straight-line position from your head to your knees.

    Breed: American Pit Bull Terrier/MixAge: 2 years old Sex: MaleColors: BlueAdoption Fee: $95.00

    The staff at the San Diego Humane Society have learned that I can brighten up a room with my spunky personality and I make every new activity and adventure. I approach life with lots of enthusiasm and I absolutely love to play and get my exercise. I have

    spent some time in our Behavior and Training Program and will be looking for experienced dog owners who can help me to keep up my training plans and exercises. My trainers say that I am doing a fantastic job and I have quite a few tricks under my belt, like sit, stay, leave it, come and go to your bed. One of my favorite past-times is playing with toys!

    I am very friendly, energetic, and active. I would really benefit and love to participate in training. I am a handsome and hilarious fellow who is sure to bring endless entertainment to your life! After we spend our day hiking and playing in the yard, I will be ready for a good, long snuggle session. Dont let my size fool you - I make a great cuddle buddy! One thing though: due to my high energy and rambunctious play-style, I will do best in a home with children over 16 and with no cats, please.

    Just for choosing me to be your next furry family member and to make my transition a success, you will receive a complimentary care package that includes a collar, leash, harness, crate, PetSafe toy, bully

    stick, treats, treat bag and ID tag (a $100 value, altogether).

    My adoption fee includes my spay / neuter, current vaccinations, permanent microchip identification, a certificate for a free veterinary exam, a gift from Hills Science Diet, a license if residing in Oceanside or Vista and limited veterinary medical coverage from VCA Hospitals up to $250.

    San Diego Humane Society and SPCA5500 Gaines St. San Diego, Calif. 92110(619) 299-7012Sdhumane.org ADOPTION HOURSMonday through Friday: 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.Saturday and Sunday: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

    MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014 9LOCAL NEWS

    Strengthen your core to weaken back pain

    HERCULES ADOPT A PET

  • stations has spawned CountryFest which KSON presents in June and October. The concerts feature several country artists veteran and up-and-coming - and takes place at the Lakeside Rodeo Grounds with general admission tickets under $20. The popularity of these events seems to be growing, with their last concert selling out.

    Rounding out the lineup of stations housed in Mission Valley is FM 94.9, a modern rock station that caters to several subgenres and also has a hand in cultivating the San Diego music scene. Between sponsoring local concerts and The Local 94/9 hosted by Tim Pyles on

    Sundays at 9 p.m., they do what they can to shine a light on local San Diego bands. And they seem to enjoy their locale as well.

    Mission Valley is great in that it is so easy to find good food and/or to run errands before or after my airshift, stated Hilary Schmidt Chambers, midday DJ for 94.9. Target, Old Navy, Ikea, Trader Joes, even West Elm - its so nice having them all so close. Plus, I love the river - its an unexpected stretch of nature right in the middle of all the businesses - it makes me happy whenever Im near it.

    JazzWednesdays - Gilbert Castellanos Jazz Jam at Seven Grand. Free. 9 p.m. SevenGrandBars.com - 3054 University Ave., 92104

    Fridays - Sam Johnson Jazz Group at Cosmos Coffee Cafe. Free. 3 to 5p.m. CosmosCoffeeCafe.com - 8278 La Mesa Blvd., 91942

    Saturdays - Jazz with George and Alan at Bistro Sixty. Free. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. www.BistroSixtySD.com - 5987 El Cajon Blvd., 92115

    Saturdays Douglas Kvandal with the LiveJazz! Quartet at the Amigo Spot a the Kings Inn. Free. 7 p.m. www.kingsinnsandiego.com - 1333 Hotel Circle South, 92108

    August 2 samdiego Jazz Trio at San Pasqual Winery Tasting Room. Free. 7 p.m. www.SanPasqualWinery.com - 8364 La Mesa Blvd., 91942

    aLTERNaTIVEJuly 12 The Midnight Pine at Riviera Supper Club. Free. 9 p.m. www.RivieraSupperClub.com - 7777 University Ave., 91941

    July 14 Big Bad Buffalo, Oh, Spirit, and Octagrape at the Casbah. $6. 9 p.m. www.CasbahMusic.com - 2501 Kettner Blvd., 92101

    July 25 Hills Like Elephants, Relations, and Soft Lions at Soda Bar. $6. 9 p.m. www.SodaBarMusic.com - 3615 El Cajon Blvd., 92104

    CLaSSICaLJuly 18 19 Summer Pops: The Music of Abba at the Embarcadero Marina Park South. $27-84. 7:30 p.m. www.SanDiegoSymphony.org - 1 Marina Park Way, 92101

    July 25 Danny Elfmans Music from the Films of Tim Burton at the Embarcadero Marina Park South.

    $28 - $90. 8 p.m. www.SanDiegoSymphony.org - 1 Marina Park Way, 92101

    July 27 TICO Summer Pops Concert of light classics from BRd.way, TV, film and more at the Social Hall of Tifereth Israel Synagogue. $20. 3 p.m. www.tiferethIsrael.com/tico - 6660 Cowles Mountain Blvd., 92119

    PoPTuesdays - Suzanne Shea and Bob Wade at Bistro Sixty. Free 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.www.BistroSixtySD.com - 5987 El Cajon Blvd., 92115 - Call and hold your table 619-287-8186

    Wednesdays Westside Inflection at Riviera Supper Club. Free. 8 p.m. www.RivieraSupperClub.com - 7777 University Ave., 91941

    Fridays Nathan Welden at Bistro Sixty. Free. 6:30 p.m. www.BistroSixtySD.com - 5987 El Cajon Blvd., 92115

    July 12 Danielle Taylor at San Pasqual Winery Tasting Room. Free. 7 p.m. www.SanPasqualWinery.com - 8364 La Mesa Blvd., 91942

    July 26 - People of Earth at San Pasqual Winery Tasting Room. Free. 7 p.m. www.SanPasqualWinery.com - 8364 La Mesa Blvd., 91942

    oTHERThursdays -- Musical Meditation (Kirtan) at Pilgrimage of the Heart Yoga Studio. Free. 8:15-9:15p.m. Pilgrimageyoga.com - 3287 Adams Ave, 92116

    July 18 Saved by the 90s at Pal Joeys. Free 9 p.m. www.PalJoeysOnline.com - 5147 Waring Rd., 92120

    July 19 Bedhead Revisited at Wolfs Head Pub. Free. 6:30 p.m. www.WolfsHeadPub.com - 5981 Fairmount Ave, 92120

    Bands, venues, and music-lovers: Please submit listings for this calendar by emailing [email protected]

    Jen

    Mission Valley NewsVan Tieghem

    Hidden radio studios broadcast most popular music stations in town

    One of the best kept secrets of Mission Valley is that one of its office parks is home to the studios that broadcast some of the most popular radio stations in the region, including country music station KSON (97.3 FM), alternative rock station KBZT (better known as FM 94.9) and adult contemporary station KIFM (better known as Easy 98.1).

    The stations are now owned by Lincoln Financial Media and have operated out of offices in Mission Valley since 1989.

    When we moved from La Mesa to our current location we were down to two choices: a building in Downtown San Diego and this building, said Chris Turner, promotions and marketing manager for all three stations. We chose [Mission Valley] because of its central location, ease to get to/from and ample, free parking. All of those things have gotten a little more complicated over the years. But as our lease has come up for renewal the cost of a move and the selling points listed above keep us here.

    Turners enthusiasm for the three stations is clear he recites their spots in the Arbitron rankings (think Nielsen for radio) from memory and mentions that KSONs top spot was recently surpassed, but only by Easy 98.1.

    If someones gonna knock us out of number one, as long as its one of our brother or sister stations, I guess its ok, Turner chuckled.

    Turner has been behind the scenes in radio for as long as he can remember. His father was the famous KSON cowboy, who made appearances and playing promotional events for the station from the 1970s to mid-1980s. As early as age 5, Turner was exposed to radio stations, personnel, and even music talent. He points out a framed photograph of himself at a young age with Dolly Parton.

    Turner joined the station in his

    late teens starting as a part-time promotions assistant tasked with picking up laundry, getting coffee, and other errands. He moved through the ranks as coordinator, promotions manager and other titles before landing his current position.

    Several changes in recent years have led to Easy 98.1s coronation as the top radio station in San Diego. The station had been known as Smooth Jazz 98.1 since the mid-1990s, but after the format took a steep tumble in ratings it was rebranded as Smooth 98.1 and finally became Easy 98.1 about a year ago and is now a true adult contemporary station.

    The station now plays easily recognizable hit songs from the mid-1970s up to nearly contemporary songs; you might hear Hall and Oates followed by One Direction followed by George Harrison quite an assortment.

    KSON on the other hand is straightforward in its lineup of country music. This has kept them rated in the top ten for quite some time, according to Turner. They also simultaneously broadcast their signal on two stations 97.3 for San Diego and 92.1 in North County.

    The success of these country

    10 MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

  • AT&T opens store of the future in Mission Valley

    ScottShermanCity CouncilmemberDistrict 7

    In wake of the wildfires that started in numerous areas of San Diego last month, I wanted to ensure that residents have the information necessary to safe-guard your home from wildfires and also to be prepared to depart if you are forced to evacuate.

    With the 03 and 07 wildfires fresh in most of our minds, the fires that erupted last month caught many residents by sur-prise. This is why it is important for you and your family to pre-pare now and be ready to leave at a moments notice.

    The best way to protect against the damages caused by fires is to prevent it from happening in the first place. Here are some tips to help protect your home and fam-ily during this years fire season:

    Ensure the area around your home is clear of dead or overgrown plants, brush, and vegetationClean leaves and branches from your roof and guttersPlant fire resistant vegeta-

    tion around your home to serve as a barrier to pos-sible fires. Remove any dead growth around your propertyThese are just a few steps you

    can take to help protect your home. It is also important that you are able to leave at a mo-ments notice if you are threat-ened by a wildfire. Creating a checklist of supplies and keeping them in a readily available loca-tion will help save time during an emergency. A few items to be sure to include are:

    Important documents and photosPrescriptions and other medicationsPersonal computer and hard drivesall petsFor more information on fire

    preparedness, please visit the City of San Diego Fire Depart-ments website at www.sandi-ego.gov/fire. Please also contact my office for any concerns in the community at [email protected] or call at 619-236-6677.

    Together we can ensure that our communities will stay safe during the wildfire season.

    COMMON SENSE CORNER

    BEING READy FOR FIRE SEASON

    AT&T opened its fully upgrad-ed and renovated retail store of the future in Mission Valley on July 2.

    The company invested more than $1 million to refurnish and completely redesign the store, expanding it to 2,000 square feet.

    The goal of the new store de-sign is to take create an inter-active shopping experience that allows customers to play and in-teract with the products instead of simply look at them behind

    a counter, said Tammi Terrell, vice president and general man-ager of AT&Ts Southwest and Hawaii division.

    The customer experience is at the heart of this design, Terrell said.

    The Mission Valley store al-ready has the highest sales vol-ume of the companys 20 stores in the San Diego region, Terrell said.

    The expansion of the store led to a 40 percent growth in hir-ing, Terrell said. These arent

    part-time, minimum wage jobs either. The average sales em-ployee makes between $40,000 to $70,000 a year with base pay and commission. AT&T current-ly has more than 80 job openings at its stores in the San Diego area.

    Mayor Kevin Faulconer was on hand to help open the store.

    The fact that this is the first store I think speaks volumes about who we are as a city and where were going, Faulconer said.

    MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014 11LOCAL NEWS

  • ber of members. Hosig and Miller returned on

    June 16 to provide an update to the Navajo Community Plan-ners.

    Weve jumped through the hoops and spent a lot of money to get to this point, Hosig said.

    Matt Adams, chair of the Na-vajo Planners, said the group has been tasked to represent the community and serve in an advisory role for city decision makers.

    We are your eyes and ears. Thats why we want to hear your opinion on this, Adams said.

    Judy Gervais, who lives on 50th Street, said she opposes the approval of any medi-cal marijuana cooperatives in Grantville, which she said is already struggling with crime from transients who come in on the trolley.

    Ill fight this to the end, be-cause we dont need this here in our family neighborhoods, she said. You guys ought to go downtown.

    On June 23, the Linda Vista Planning Group heard from the applicant on Buenos Avenue in the Morena area.

    This is kind of a pocket in-dustrial community that we thought would be special be-cause it is so private, said Mi-chael Rollins, who represents the applicant. Its not going to attract a lot of off-street atten-tion.

    The facility would be approx-imately 2,500 square feet, and unlike large out-of-state opera-tions that would only be in it for a profit, the applicant would be committed to giving back to the community, donating ex-cess revenues to local charities, Rollins said.

    Eventually, once city staff have completed the review to ensure the application is com-plete, the community planning groups will hold public hear-ings to gather input and make a recommendation. The appli-cation will be considered by the citys hearing officer, who will issue a ruling one way or the other. Interested parties can appeal the hearing officers rul-ing to the city Planning Com-mission.

    Applicants, from page 2

    When Mexican eatery La Casitas closed its College Avenue shop in May, San Diego State fraternity brothers and tight-budgeted students alike mourned the loss of their favor-ite spot for burritos and cheap alcohol. With a rather quick turnaround, a new restaurant has already taken over and giv-en the space an entirely differ-ent feel.

    Bruxie is a cafe-style res-taurant specializing in waffles sandwiches. The sandwiches resemble a taco, but instead of a fried tortilla, an airy, crisp waffle houses the ingredients. Waffles are surprisingly versa-tile, allowing for a wide range of sandwich options. The obvious but delicious fried chicken sand-wich isnt greasy and southern, but rather is a lighter, west-coast take with a thin breast and crunchy cider slaw. Other high-lights include the rich, satisfy-ing roasted mushroom and goat cheese sandwich and just about any of the breakfast sandwich-esits hard to go wrong with a combination of eggs, meat and cheese on a bed of waffles.

    Sandwiches aside, Bruxie has an overwhelmingly large menu, proving that a waffle can be consumed at almost any hour of the day. The waffle theme is carried throughout the menu and includes offerings such as waffle fries, waffle sundaes and even salads with baked Parme-san waffle crisps. The menu does continue past the waffle shtick; soup, artisan soda, coffee drinks and soft-serve frozen-custard floats are also available.

    Where Bruxie truly shines is its desserts, which are also served in the waffle sandwich style. The most popular sweet dish, the creme brulee, consists of creamy custard, bits of burnt sugar (that add great texture) and fresh berries, all inside a warm waffle. Another standout is the lemon cream and berries,

    Bruxie brings creative waffle cuisine to San Diego ElisseMillerMission Valley News

    which makes for a nice snack on a warm day.

    The dishes at Bruxie are in-spired by street food, as evi-denced by its disposable, por-table plating and easy-to-carry sandwiches. However, this also means most meals are very light.

    Were trying to fill you up, but not make you have to pull over to the side of the road to take a nap, senior general manager Bill Anascavage said.

    This is the eighth Bruxie loca-tion, all of which are located in the western United States. A fa-miliarity with the southern Cali-fornia area specifically means most ingredients are local and fresh, and the quality is evident in all of its dishes. For example, Bruxie doesnt carry any name brand sodas, but instead serves craft sodas from an Orange-

    based company, resulting in unique flavors such as spiced cola (my favorite) and vanilla cream.

    While this is the first location in San Diego, it wont be the last. Bruxie will open a location in Horton Plaza in 2015, according to owner Dean Simon. The com-pany has had its eyes on San Di-ego for some time though. When the plans for the Conrad Prebys Aztec Student Union were being drawn up, administrators from SDSU approached Bruxie to be one of its featured restaurants. Bruxie had to decline as it didnt feel stable enough to open anoth-er location (they only had two lo-cations at the time). Then, plans were set into motion to open a lo-cation at Seaport Village. Those plans fell through, but about 45 days later, Bruxie acquired the

    former La Casitas location.San Diego will be a fabulous

    area to continue our growth, Si-mon said.

    Bruxie is located near the SDSU residence halls and ac-cepts all student meal plan op-tions. However, the customers at Bruxie generally arent stu-dents. The times Ive visited, Ive seen families (a weird sight on a college campus) and groups of young people that have clearly traveled from other parts of San Diego to see what the waffle hype is all about. Itll be inter-esting to see if this demographic changes once SDSU student re-turn for the fall semester.

    A Bruxie waffle sandwich costs between $7-9, meaning a combo meal costs around $11-13. Con-sidering that Bruxie replaced a restaurant with $6 burritos, it is not likely to attract as many students as its predecessor, but it may not need to.

    Its jarring to see a place that once encouraged beer chugging transform into a sophisticated cafe that touts gluten free op-tions and strawberry Arnold Palmers.

    Bruxie is a delightful addition to the dining options in the Mis-sion Valley area, and Im glad our community was selected as the location of its first San Diego foray.

    12 MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014LOCAL NEWS

  • Adults should always super-vise children around campfires.

    CampingAlways use a flame retar-

    dant tent and set up camp far away from any campfires.

    Only use flashlights or bat-tery-powered lanterns inside the tent - do not use liquid-filled heaters or lanterns.

    Always build your campfire down wind away from your tent clear all vegetation and dig a pit surrounded by rocks before building your campfire.

    Store liquid fire starter (not gasoline) away from your tent and campfire and use dry kin-dling to freshen a campfire.

    Always put out a campfire when going to sleep or leaving the campsite. To extinguish the fire, cover with dirt or pour wa-ter over it.

    WildfireCurrent dry conditions and

    hot temperatures can pose a se-rious Wildfire threat to county residents.

    Supervise your children at all times to keep them from get-ting into mischief.

    Keep lighters and matches locked away and do not let chil-dren play in canyons.

    Keep magnifying glasses away from small children in just seconds small children can accidentally begin a small fire or burn themselves.

    First Aid for BurnsIf your clothes catch on fire,

    Stop, Drop, Roll, Cool and Call 9-1-1

    Always cool a burn area with cool water.

    Never use ice, butter, Vase-line or other ointments.

    For serious burns, seek im-mediate emergency treatment.

    A sudoku puzzle is a grid of nine by nine squares or cells, that has been subdivided into nine subgrids or regions of three by three cells.

    The objective of sudoku is to enter a digit from 1 through 9

    in each cell, in such a way that:

    1. Each horizontal row contains each digit exactly once2. Each vertical column contains each digit exactly once3. Each subgrid or region contains each digit exactly once

    Sudoku

    Try to fill in the missing numbers.Use the numbers 1 through 16 to complete the equations.

    1. Each number is only used once.

    2. Each row is a math equation. Each column is a math equation.

    3. Remember that multiplication and division are performed before addition and subtraction.

    Math Squares

    1. Start in the center of the maze.

    2. Get to the exit on the left as fast as possible.

    3. If you make it to the exit on your first try, congratulations!

    Maze Escape

    ANSWERS ON PAGE 16 ANSWERS ON PAGE 16 ANSWERS ON PAGE 16

    DavidOgulMission Valley News

    T ifereth Israel Synagogue in the San Diego neigh-borhood of San Carlos is breaking the mold in local synagogue financing by elimi-nating mandatory membership dues and asking congregants to contribute what they wish. The move comes as congregations across the country deal with growing numbers of Jews who are opting not to affiliate with a particular temple.

    Administrators at the Con-servative congregation are con-fident that members voluntary contributions will be more than enough to sustain operations.

    When it came time to build the Mishkan, the tent-sanctu-ary in which the Israelites wor-shiped in the Sinai desert, every Israelite was expected to bring a freewill offering of their own choosing to build the sanctu-ary but God did not say how much, noted Rabbi Leonard Rosenthal. God knew that be-cause of the Israelites love of their faith and tradition, they would be as generous as pos-sible. I am confident that our congregants will do the same.

    In fact, the Biblical chapter Rabbi Rosenthal refers to is known as Trumah, which is the name of the new financial mod-el at Tifereth Israel.

    Synagogues across the coun-try finance their operations by charging dues for members, with factors such as family size and age determining the amount required. And families typically must provide docu-mentation of a financial hard-ship when seeking a dues re-

    TIFERETH ISRAEL CUTS MANDATORy DUES

    duction.At Tifereth Israel, that will no

    longer be the case.No Jew who wants to join our

    congregation will ever again feel daunted by the financial process inherent with the old system, said Jerry Hermes, the incoming president of the con-gregations Board of Directors. We hope Jews who are looking for a stress-free and open syna-gogue experience will give us a long look.

    The decision to eliminate man-datory dues is already drawing attention from congregations across the country. Thats be-cause the transformation comes amid growing conversation around the nation question-ing the long-term sustainabil-ity of the traditional member-ship dues structure. Declining membership combined with the inflationary costs of operating a synagogue has forced many congregations to hike their dues in recent years to keep afloat fi-nancially. And that has contrib-uted, in many cases, to further declines in membership.

    Tifereth Israel Synagogue is confident it will attract addition-

    al members as people discover the congregation has eliminat-ed mandatory dues. And a large number of current members say they will give more than they have in the past. Temple Israel, a Conservative congregation in the Boston suburb of Sharon, Mass., has seen a rise in income and a growth in membership after adopting a similar model.

    We strongly believe that this innovative program will enhance and ensure the contin-ued vibrancy of Tifereth Israel, said former congregation Presi-dent Dr. Seth Krosner.

    Approximately 500 people are members of the synagogue, which was founded in 1905 and remains one of the larger Con-servative congregations in the region. The Tifereth Israel Syn-agogue campus at 6660 Cowles Mountain Boulevard in east San Diego is home to the Silverman Preschool, Tifereth Israel Torah School, and the nondenomina-tional Tifereth Israel Commu-nity Orchestra. Tifereth Israel is an egalitarian congregation that has long represented both tradition and innovation in the Jewish community.

    Dont let a burn injury ruin your summer

    Every summer, local hospital emergency rooms fill with peo-ple seeking treatment for sum-mer burn injuries. The Burn Institute urges people to think about how to prevent fire and burn injuries this summer.

    Ultraviolet RaysAlways apply a sunscreen of

    25 SPF or greater when going outdoors.

    Serious sunburns can occur even when it is cloudy.

    Wear dark sunglasses to protect your eyes, and wear a broad brimmed hat to protect your head and neck.

    BarbecuesAlways supervise a barbe-

    cue grill when in use.Keep children and pets

    away from grills.When using a charcoal grill,

    only use charcoal starter fluids designed for barbecue grills - do not add fluid after coals have been lit.

    When using a gas grill, be sure that the hose connection is tight and check hoses for leaks applying soapy water to the hoses easily and safely will re-veal if there are any leaks.

    Always dispose hot coals in designated fire receptacles - buried coals retain intense heat for up to 24 hours and may cause a serious burn injury to an unsuspecting passerby who steps on them.

    Camp FiresWhen building a campfire

    always use a designated fire pit.Before you leave your camp-

    site, make sure the fire is prop-erly extinguished.

    Douse and stir the fire with water.

    Never leave a fire unattend-ed.

    MISSIONVALLEYNEWS.COM AUGUST, 2014 13LOCAL NEWS

  • Park and Recreation staff are launching a new program beginning July 14 that challenges participants to walk 30 miles in a city park in 30 days. An alternative challenge is for participants to swim 20 miles in a city pool more than 1,000 laps. City staff will lead walks through community parks. Participants can also walk or swim on their own.

    Residents who are up for the

    Advocates for a skate park in Linda Vista achieved a major victory when they won a state grant of $3 million an-nounced July 1.

    The grant was made by the state Department of Housing and Community Development through its $200 million Hous-ing Related Parks Program, which was authorized by the voter-approved Proposition 1C in 2006.

    The city has identified an ap-proximately 40,000 square foot space for the skate park in the southeast corner of the existing Linda Vista Community Park on Levant Street.

    The Tony Hawk Foundation has also granted $40,000 to the Linda Vista Skate Park project.

    With money in hand, city Park and Recreation officials will be-gin a series of community work-shops to develop the design and

    R ides & Smiles a transpor-tation program that helps older adults get to medical ap-pointments, grocery stores, social and religious functions recently expanded to serve residents of the 92108 ZIP code in Mission Valley, as well as residents in the 92116, 92123, 92014 and 92029 ZIP codes.

    Organized by Jewish Family Service of San Diegos On the Go program, Rides & Smiles is the largest volunteer-based transportation service in San Diego County. As a result of the expanded service, the program expects to provide more than 42,000 rides in the next year. Jewish Family Service aims to recruit and train 100 new vol-unteers this year, with a special emphasis on the new service ar-eas.

    Linda Vista skate park wins $3 million grant

    features of the skateboarding fa-cility, including ramps, lighting, access and viewing areas.

    The skate park has broad community support from civic leaders and business owners in Linda Vista as well as City Councilmember Scott Sherman.

    I was thrilled to hear the news, Sherman said. This was

    New transportation option available for Mission Valley

    Individuals age 60 years and older represent the fastest growing segment of San Diego Countys population, with the number of residents expected to more than double by 2030, said Meredith Morgenroth, director of senior transportation for Jew-ish Family Service, in a written statement. The lack of easy, ac-cessible and affordable transpor-tation for seniors is a problem recognized at the national, state and local levels.

    For additional information, call (858) 637-3050 or visit www.jfssd.org/onthego.

    community-driven from the mo-ment I took office. It was one of the things people in Linda Vista talked to me about.

    The city also received a $1.5 million grant from the state and $40,000 from the Tony Hawk Foundation for the construc-tion of a new skate park in City Heights.

    By Gina Cord, founder of Mission Valley News

    GINASVALLEY VIEWS

    Mayor Kevin Faulconer to dedicate sister cities signs

    On July 21 from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the San Diego Civic Center Concourse Plaza, Mayor Kevin Faulconer together with David Edick, Jr., President of the San Diego International Sister Cities Association, will dedicate the signs. San Diego has 15 sister cities spread around the globe and all are listed on these new signs that will become a part of San Diegos downtown scenery.

    The sister city program was founded by President Eisenhower during his term as President of the United States in order to join together the people of other countries with the USA in promoting cultural, educational and economic benefits for all to share. Mayor Faulconer is an avid believer in this same philosophy and during his term hopes to make it a top priority.

    Several of my friends and myself are involved in the promotion of the Leon (Mexico)/San Diego sister city board in a continuing effort to keep the public informed on the important work of the sister cities.

    World conference at the Town & Country Hotel & Convention Center

    Another international group with the same thought in mind of educating people to lasting peace and cultures of around the globe is the World Council for Curriculum and Instruction (WCCI) who are expecting approximately 500 members for their 16th conference on Aug. 17-24 in San Diego. The title of the conference is: Integrating Education For A Lasting Peace And Care For The Planet Earth.

    Carole Caparros of Alliant International University here in San Diego and on the conferences organizing committee advises, This will be a very well-attended conference as our members from around the world are looking forward to the trip to San Diego and to the many educational advantages that are found here.

    We welcome these brilliant minds to help enlighten us on peace, culture and trends from around the planet!

    If you have more News and Interesting People from the world, contact Gina Cord at 619.683.2434 or email [email protected]

    Suspect charged in Mission Valley homicide caseA man accused in the shooting deaths of two brothers and a woman who was engaged to one of them -- a crime that came to light when two of the victims were found mortally wounded in a parked car at a Mission Valley mall last Christmas Eve -- pleaded not guilty June 25 to murder charges that could lead to the death penalty.

    Carlo Gallopa Mercado, who is charged with three counts of murder and a special circumstance allegation of multiple murders, was ordered held without bail.

    District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis will decide later whether the 29-year-old defendant will face the death penalty or life in prison without parole if hes convicted.

    Mercados arrest June 20 in Mira Mesa came nearly six months after Ilona Flint and Salvatore Belvedere, both 22, were found fatally shot shortly before 1:30 a.m. Dec. 24 at Westfield Mission Valley, which was open late for last-

    minute holiday shopping.Flint managed to call 911 shortly

    before she died at the scene. Belvedere died at a hospital two days later. Gianni Belvedere, 24, was missing for several weeks following the shootings of his fiancee and brother. In mid-January, his body was found in the trunk of a car outside a fast-foot restaurant in Riverside. He also had been shot in the head.

    Investigators found substantial probable cause linking Mercado to the slayings, homicide Lt. Mike Hastings said, but declined to elaborate. The lieutenant said he wasnt sure there was any relation between the defendant and the victims.

    Outside court today, Deputy District Attorney Brian Erickson would not comment on a possible motive.

    At this point, you know, motive can be anything, the prosecutor said. It is an ongoing investigation.

    Mercados attorney, Michael Berg, said his client was dismayed about being arrested and charged with the murders.

    Berg said Mercado -- whom he called a gun aficionado -- was found with two