Journal of Aboriginal Health, Communities in Crisis

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Health Canada collaborated with NAHO to commission 12 research papers on First Nations Communities at-risk and in crisis

Transcript of Journal of Aboriginal Health, Communities in Crisis

  • 1. Journal of Aboriginal Health Communities in Crisis Volume 5 Paulette C. Tremblay, PhD September 9, 2010
  • 2. First Nation Communities in Crisis
    • Health Canada collaborated with NAHO to commission 12 research papers on First Nations Communities at-risk and in crisis.
    • Journal of Aboriginal Health : 3 Issues of Vol. 5 Issue 1 4 Articles Issue 2 4 Articles Issue 3 3 Articles
  • 3. 9 Discussion Papers & 3 Literature Reviews
    • Colonialism & State Dependency
    • Cultural Safety
    • Culture & Language
    • Intergenerational Trauma
    • Justice & Security
    • Resilience
    • Self Determination
    • Spirituality
    • Traditional Health & Healing
    • Resilience
    • Social Capital
    • Traumatic Stress
  • 4. Definition of Crisis
    • Crisis a community is unable to mobilize its own natural problem-solving and coping skills and needs help to recover.
    • A shared history of colonization and its legacy of cultural trauma have put all First Nation communities in Canada at risk of crisis.
  • 5. Communities & Protective Factors
    • Every First Nation community is different.
    • Not all are in crisissome are very successful.
    • Each possesses different protective factors that contribute to their balance & stability.
    • Protective factors refer to conditions that build resilience, serve as buffers against risk & may be able to prevent risk.
  • 6. Language and Culture as Protective Factors for At-Risk Communities Onowa McIvor and Art Napolean November 2009, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp.6-25 Literature Review : Examined studies on the use of language or culture and the effects on the health of Aboriginal People.
  • 7. The Link Between Language and Culture
    • Language is one of the most tangible symbols of culture and group identity
    • The loss of language is tied to a deep sense of loss of a groups identity and culture
    • Language is one of the main ways to transfer a culture from one generation to another
  • 8. Language and Culture as Protective Factors in 6 Linked Themes
    • Connection Between the Land and Health
    • Traditional Medicine
    • Spirituality
    • Traditional Foods
    • Traditional Activities
    • Language
  • 9. Community Resilience: Models, Metaphors and Measures Laurence Kirmayer, Megha Sehdev, Rob Whitley, St phane Dandeneau & Colette Isaac November 2009, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp.62-117 Assessed definitions of resilience,examined links between resilience and social capital, and considered interventions that promote resilience and well-being in Aboriginal communities.
  • 10. Definition of Resilience
    • Individual resilience a persons ability to overcome stress and adversity.
    • Community resilience how people overcome stress by drawing from cultural networks that constitute communities.
    • Resilience is a dynamic interaction of individual and collective processes that contribute to adaptability, strength, the ability to surmount obstacles, meet challenges and recover from setbacks.
    • Resilience exists at the level of families, groups, communities and larger social systems.
  • 11. Sources of Aboriginal Community Resilience
    • Connections to family and communityinterdependence & caring
    • Oral tradition & storytellingways to transmit cultural knowledge
    • Connection to the land, environment & nature
    • Healing traditionspaths for personal transformation & conflict resolution
    • Ceremony & spirituality-access collective wisdom, humility & being connected
    • Cultural knowledge, identity & language
    • Cultural continuity-way individual & group moves from past through present to future with hope & possibility
    • Collective & political action-tools to challenge oppressive forces to create own future
  • 12. Ways to Promote Community Resilience
    • Strengthen social capital, networks and support.
    • Find ways to revive language, culture and spirituality.
    • Support families and parents to ensure healthy child development.
    • Enhance local control and group effectiveness.
    • Build infrastructure at many levels (buildings, human resources).
    • Increase economic opportunity and diversification.
    • Increase human diversity.
  • 13. Traditional Medicine and Restoration of Wellness Strategies Dawn Martin Hill November 2009, Volume 5, Issue 1, pp.26-42 Literature Review Examined traditional medicine and Indigenous knowledge as protective factors for Aboriginal populations and communities.
  • 14. Factors that Sustain Communities in Crisis
    • Colonialism is the root cause
    • Education is a tool for assimilation
    • The loss of value and support for women
    • The prevalence of youth suicide
  • 15. Recommendations
    • Traditional knowledge and medicine can be protective factors.
    • Indigenous knowledge and traditional healing are keys to empowerment and prevention.
  • 16. Emerging Themes Across Papers, #1
    • First Nations community imbalance in all social determinants of health can be traced to colonization as the root cause.
    • To deconstruct crisis an Indigenous world-view is essential in knowing how to move forward.
    • Take a strengths-based approach: understand resilience and how protective factors work.
  • 17. Emerging Themes Across Papers, #2
    • Balance, social determinants and an Indigenous world-view.
    • Problem of separate departments and programmatic silos horizontality.
    • Community-Centredness requires a team approach that is flexible and responsive to needs.
  • 18. Conclusions
    • Investments in protective factors may promote resilience and increase the likelihood of community success:
      • cultural continuity (language, identity, traditional healing)
      • self-determination
      • Leadership
      • economic sustainability
      • spirituality