Characterization of Portland Cement Concrete of Portland Cement Concrete Coefficient of Thermal...

Click here to load reader

  • date post

    28-May-2018
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    215
  • download

    2

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Characterization of Portland Cement Concrete of Portland Cement Concrete Coefficient of Thermal...

  • i

    Glenn Department of Civil Engineering

    Lowry Hall

    Clemson, SC 29634

    (864) 656 3000

    Characterization of Portland Cement Concrete Coefficient

    of Thermal Expansion in South Carolina

    Report No: FHWA-SC-17-03

    T. H. Dellinger

    A. Poursaee

    Submitted to the South Carolina Department

    of Transportation

    This research was sponsored by the South

    Carolina Department of Transportation. The

    opinions, findings and conclusions expressed in

    this report are those of the author(s) and not

    necessarily those of the SCDOT. This report does

    not comprise a standard, specification or

    regulation.

  • ii

    1. Report No. FHWA-SC-17-03

    2. Government Accession No.

    3. Recipients Catalog No.

    4. Title and Subtitle Characterization of Portland Cement Concrete Coefficient of Thermal Expansion in South Carolina

    5. Report Date October 31, 2016 6. Performing Organization Code

    7. Author(s) Trent H. Dellinger Amir Poursee

    8. Performing Organization Report No.

    9. Performing Organization Name and Address Glenn Department of Civil Engineering Clemson University Clemson, SC, 29631-0911

    10. Work Unit No. 11. Contract or Grant No. SPR 722

    12. Sponsoring Agency Name and Address South Carolina Department of Transportation P.O. Box 191 Columbia, South Carolina 29202

    13. Type of Report and Period Covered Draft of Final Report, 2015-2016 14. Sponsoring Agency Code

    15. Supplementary Notes 16. Abstract The South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) sough to regionally calibrate specific input parameters used by the Mechanistic Empirical Pavement Design (MEPDG) software. These properties include the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), compressive strength, and unit weight of typical SC concrete mixtures. Additionally, splitting tensile strength was included in the experimental program. Laboratory produced mixtures were tested to identify the effective CTE value of the cement paste, sand, and coarse aggregate compotes typically used in SC concrete pavements. A 25 percent cement replacement of type F fly ash and a single source of natural sand was used in the mortar component of the concrete mixtures. A total three coarse aggregate sources were used in the form of no. 57 crushed stone product or a 75:25 blend of no. 57 and no. 789 crushed stone. The CTE values of the individual phases (i.e. cement paste, sand and coarse aggregates), and concrete mixtures were measured. The resulting CTE of paste and sand was 7.3 and 5.910-6 in./in./F, respectively. The CTE of three coarse aggregates ranged from 2.96 to 3.83to-6 in./in./F. The range of average CTE values of the concrete was 4.82 to 5.3210-6 in./in./F. The magnitude of the CTE values were shown not to be directly related to the compressive strength. Field cored specimens were also taken from a section of SC 80 in Spartanburg county, SC, and analyzed. Three pavement slabs were arbitrarily selected along a 3.5-mi. pavement section. The targeted slabs were of the outside travel lane, with cores taken between the wheel paths at the leading end, middle, and trailing ends of each slab. There was not significant difference between the average CTE values of pavement slabs. The effective CTE of SC - 80 concrete pavement was determined to be 5.0510-6 in./in./F. The compressive strength and unit weight properties of the SC 80 specimens suggested that the laboratory produced concrete mixtures from the first part of this study were representative of the concrete pavements in South Carolina. 17. Key Words Coefficient of Thermal Expansion, CTE, MEPDG

    18. Distribution Statement No restrictions. This document is available to the public through the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161

    19. Security Classif. (of this report) Unclassified

    20. Security Classif. (of this page) Unclassified

    21. No. of Pages

    22. Price

    Form DOT F 1700.7 (8-69)

  • iii

    Disclaimer The contents of this report reflect the views of the authors who are responsible for the facts

    and the accuracy of the data presented within. The contents do not necessarily reflect the official

    views or policies of the South Carolina Department of Transportation and this report does not

    constitute a standard, specification, or regulation.

  • iv

    Acknowledgments This project was funded by the South Carolina Department of Transportation and the

    Federal Highway Administration. Their support is greatly appreciated. The authors would like to

    acknowledge the assistance and feedback provided by personnel at the Office of Materials and

    Research of the South Carolina Department of Transportation.

  • v

    Executive Summary With FHWA support, AASHTO recently officially adopted a new "mechanistic-empirical"

    process for designing pavements in which nationally calibrated models are used to simulate and

    predict pavement behavior that are best-fit approximations based on observations from across the

    US and Canada. Unfortunately, the predicted pavement outcomes using national models may not

    be accurate for specific locations. For this reason, virtually all states that use AASHTO pavement

    design methods are most strongly encouraged to perform a calibration of the new pavement models

    to local conditions. Because the new process is a complete break from the old procedure, the

    design inputs are totally different and frequently based on properties that the Department has not

    previously measured. While some inputs can be reasonably estimated, it is important to actually

    measure key properties that have been found to have the greatest impact on design predictions to

    ensure accurate pavement designs.

    The South Carolina Department of Transportation (SCDOT) has desired to regionally

    calibrate specific input parameter used by the Mechanistic Empirical Pavement Design (MEPDG)

    software. These properties include the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), compressive

    strength, and unit weight of typical SC concrete mixtures. Additionally, splitting tensile strength

    was included in the experimental program.

    This project determined the

    CTE of the most common pavement

    mixtures throughout the state of

    South Carolina using AASHTO

    T336-11 method. The data generated

    in this project provided a

    comprehensive overview of the CTE

    of concrete mixtures in South

    Carolina for direct implementation in

    designing PCC pavement and for the

    specification and testing of PCC

    materials. Laboratory produced mixtures were tested to identify the effective CTE value of the

    Images of slump measurements of laboratory mixtures

  • vi

    cement paste, sand, and coarse aggregate compotes typically used in SC concrete pavements. A

    25 percent cement replacement of type F fly ash and a single source of natural sand was used in

    the mortar component of the concrete mixtures. A total three coarse aggregate sources were used

    in the form of no. 57 crushed stone product or a 75:25 blend of no. 57 and no. 789 crushed stone.

    The CTE values of the individual phases (i.e. cement paste, sand and coarse aggregates), and

    concrete mixtures were measured. The resulting CTE of paste and sand was 7.3 and 5.910-6

    in./in./F, respectively. The CTE of three coarse aggregates ranged from 2.96 to 3.8310-6

    in./in./F. The range of average CTE values of the concrete was 4.82 to 5.3210-6 in./in./F. Results

    indicated that the CTE values were not directly related to the compressive strength on the concrete.

    The collected data were also used to calculate CTE values using the Tex-428-A method. Results

    from the Tex-428-A method in all but one data set, showed lower CTE values compared to the

    AASHTO T336-11 method. The maximum difference in CTE values between these test methods

    was 0.13410-6 in./in./F.

    Field cored specimens were also taken

    from a section of SC 80 in Spartanburg county,

    SC and analyzed. Three pavement slabs were

    arbitrary selected along a 3.5-mile pavement

    section. The targeted slabs were of the outside

    travel lane, with cores taken between the wheel

    paths at the leading end, middle, and trailing

    ends of each slab. Results showed no significant

    differences between the average CTE values of

    pavement slabs. The effective CTE of SC - 80

    concrete pavement was determined to be

    5.0510-6 in./in./F. The compressive strength

    and unit weight properties of the SC 80

    specimens suggested that the laboratory

    produced concrete mixtures from the first part of

    this study were representative of the concrete

    pavements in South Carolina.

    Leading Trailing Middle

    1

    2

    3

    Map of sampling locations along SC 80 and Example of sampling locations within a slab

  • vii

    Table of Contents Disclaimer .................................................................................................................................................... iii

    Acknowledgments ........................................................................................................................................ iv

    Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................................... v

    Table of Contents ........................................................................................................