Challenges and Opportunities Facing Platypus LLC. Challenges and Opportunities Facing Platypus LLC.

download Challenges and Opportunities Facing Platypus LLC. Challenges and Opportunities Facing Platypus LLC.

of 28

  • date post

    28-Jan-2020
  • Category

    Documents

  • view

    2
  • download

    0

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Challenges and Opportunities Facing Platypus LLC. Challenges and Opportunities Facing Platypus LLC.

  • Challenges and Opportunities Facing Platypus LLC.  Non­Market Strategy Analysis Project Report 

     

     

         

    Department of Engineering and Public Policy  New Technology Commercialization: Non­Market Public Policy Strategies for Entrepreneurs and Innovators 

      Carnegie Mellon University 

    Pittsburgh, PA   

    Clients  Paul Scerri, John Scerri, and Abhinav Valada 

    Platypus LLC.   

    Project Team  Alexander Fry and Chayoot Chatunawarat 

      Faculty Advisors 

    Dr. Deborah D. Stine and Dr. Enes Hosgor   

    MAY 2014 

      1 

  • Disclaimer and Explanatory Note Please do not cite or quote this report, or any portion thereof, as an  official Carnegie Mellon University report or document. As a student project, it has not been subjected to  the required level of critical review. This report presents the results of a one­semester university project  that is part of a class offered by the Department of Engineering and Public Policy at Carnegie Mellon  University. In completing this project, students contributed skills from their individual disciplines and gained  experience in solving problems that require interdisciplinary cooperation.     Acknowledgements: We wish to express our thanks to the following individuals for their advice during  the project: Paul Scerri, John Scerri, Abhinav Valada, John Paul Jones, Austin Mitchell, Yao Zhu & Jason  T. Jasko (University of Pittsburgh Environmental Law Clinic), Deborah D. Stine and Enes Hosgor     

      2 

  • Table of Contents   

    1. Executive Summary……………………………………………………………………………...4  2. Technology Overview…………………………………………………………………………....5 

    2.1 Company Overview………………………………………………………………….. ..5  2.2 Technology Platform…………………………………………………………………..5  2.3 Market Opportunities…………………………………………………………………..6 

    3. Challenge & Opportunity Identification………………………………………………………....9  4. Policy Context……………………………………………………………….…………………11 

    4.1 EPA Certification………………………………………………….………………….11  4.2 Incentive to Test…………………………………………………….………………...12  4.3 Financial Opportunity………………………………………………………………...12 

    5. Policy Forum…………………………………………………………………….…………….. 14  6. Range of Outcomes……………………………………………………………………………. 16 

    6.1 EPA Certification……………………………………………………………………..16  6.2 Incentive to Test………………………………………………………………………17  6.3 Financial Opportunity………………………………………………...………………18 

    7. Bargaining Context……………………………………………………………………………..21  7.1 EPA Certification……………………………………………………………………..21  7.2 Incentive to Test………………………………………………………………………22  7.3 Financial Opportunity………………………………………………...………………23 

    8. Strategy…………………………………………………………………………………………25  8.1 Gaining EPA certification……………………………………………..……………...25  8.2 Offering incentive to use Platypus’s water quality monitoring …….………………..26  8.3 Gaining USAID funding……………………………………………………………...27 

      References………………………………………………………………………………………... 28     

      3 

  • 1. Executive Summary   

    Platypus LLC, an independent company formed out of a research group at Carnegie Mellon University,  has developed an autonomous robotic boat platform for monitoring various characteristics of water quality  and culture. The company markets the product, nationally and internationally, for use in flood mitigation  and water culture testing, in both private and public environments.     One of the promising potential markets is Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) compliance monitoring,  where pollutant dischargers are required to monitor water quality in their discharging areas. In this market,  the main challenges in the non­market environment are gaining EPA certification and incentives for  autonomous testing by a robotic boat. Although Platypus’s robotic boat offers a fast and cost­effective  alternative to monitor water quality, EPA does not currently have applicable guidelines to certify  Platypus’s testing methodology. While other robotic monitoring developers would have aligned interests  with Platypus, non­robotic monitoring service providers and water polluters who need to comply with EPA  regulations would oppose the exploitation of a water monitoring robotic boat. EPA, which has a mission to  protect the environment, could offer the certification and incentives for a water monitoring robot, but it also  has to balance benefits to the public with burdens on water polluting corporations. Another facet of the  report will explore potential opportunities for Platypus. Due to its diverse applications, Platypus has many  financial opportunities that would be important for Platypus to sustain its business in long run.    The report will analyse alternate options, regarding these challenges and opportunities, according to four  main criteria: effectiveness, efficiency, responsiveness, and equity. Effectiveness is the extent that the  proposed strategy, if successful, fulfills the desired outcome. Efficiency refers to the cost of implementing  a particular strategy, in terms of both monetary and non­monetary inputs. Responsiveness refers to the  likelihood that policy actors will adopt the strategies. Equity refers to the impact of the proposed strategy  towards concerned parties­ including the public, customers and competitors.    After comparing and contrasting alternatives, it is recommended that Platypus follow the EPA’s  requirements for automatic samplers, as much as possible, and validate their testing data with those taken  using current practices, so as to solicit certification from EPA. In addition, Platypus ought to exploit the  EPA’s Audit Policy to incentivize its customers to use its service, since this program offers significant  penalty reductions to those who work aggressively­ beyond basic regulation requirements­ to ensure high  water quality. Finally, Platypus should seek funding or grants from the U.S. Agency for International  Development (USAID), which regularly supports projects in Platypus’s research area. 

       

      4 

  • 2. Technology Overview   

    2.1 Company overview  Established in 2012, Platypus LLC is an independent company in Pittsburgh. It is a spin­off from Carnegie  Mellon University’s Robotics Institute, with financial and mentoring support from Innovation Works, the  Center for Technology Transition and Enterprise Creation and Project Olympus. It is working with several  public and private organizations to provide water monitoring solutions, using autonomous robotic boats.  Platypus has a versatile range of boats, which can monitor a variety of water bodies, from small streams  and fish farms to large lakes and bays. They perform work both nationally and internationally.    2.2 Technology Platform  Platypus technology platform is a system of robotic boats integrated together with smartphones and  sensors to operate in an aquatic area. The Platypus boat (as shown in Figure 1) is a floating machine that  has a fan on the top. The dimensions of the boat are approximately 4 feet (length) by 2 feet (width) by 8  inches (height). This fan generates propulsion to drive the boat. The fan can be turned by the motor in the  direction which a controller orders. The boat is designed to be stable in water with waves and  disturbances, as well as in shallow water. Moreover, it is scalable; i.e., larger, or smaller, versions of the  boat can be used for varying circumstances. In large area, many robotic boats can also be used to collect  data together, decreasing monitoring time.   

      Figure 1: Platypus Boat [image from Platypus 2014]