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Voice of the Speciality Coffee Association of Europe No. 35 • December 2008

Transcript of Caffe Europa No. 35

  • www.scae.com

    Voice of the Speciality Coffee Association of EuropeNo. 35 December 2008

    SCAE 35 2008

    CafEuropa

  • The firstcup

    One of the mostremarkable develop-ments in the decadesince the SCAE wasfounded has been theeastward spread ofthe speciality coffeemovement and of our

    Association we now have members and chap-ters across Central and Eastern Europe, in Rus-sia, in Turkey and in the Middle East!

    To celebrate that, in this issue were present-ing a number of articles with an easterntheme, travelling to Russia, Ukraine andTurkey, and also learning more about theibrik, which plays a fundamental part in cof-fee cultures across the region.

    We also look at bulk filter coffee brewing sys-tems and the potential they offer to the spe-ciality coffee world, and we talk to our newestWBC champion, Stephen Morrissey.

    Until next time, to all our readers we offerour best wishes for this holiday season and fora healthy and prosperous New Year.

    Charles Prager

    Editor

    SCAE . , , !

    , . , , .

    . WBC Stephen Morrissey.

    , .

    Caf Europa Voice of the Speciality Coffee Association of Europe No. 35 2008 1

    The Speciality Coffee Association of Europe is a companylimited by guarantee registered in United Kingdom, Co.Reg. No. 3612500. Copies of the SCAE bye-laws are avail-able from the Secretariat. VAT Reg. no. GB 894 2009 15.

    Views expressed in Caf Europa do not necessarily represent those of its Editor, the Information Commit-tee or the Publisher, the Speciality Coffee Associationof Europe. Articles and contributions by members areinvited; please contact the Editor.

    Information Committee: Colin Smith (Chairman), HughGilmartin, Charles Prager, Michael Segal, Jens HenrikThomsen, Mick Wheeler, Inga SchaeperEditor: Charles Prager E-mail: editor@scae.com

    Advertisement Manager: Jens Henrik ThomsenTel.: + 44 (0)1245 426060 Mobile: +44 (0)7775 504594E-mail: jh.thomsen@scae.com

    Caf EuropaNo. 35, December 2008 Copyright 2008, Speciality Coffee Association of EuropeCaf Europa (Print) ISSN 1752-8429Caf Europa (Online) ISSN 1752-8437 Cover photo by Charles Prager, Stephen Morrissey, the 2008World Barista Champion and Tone Liavaag at the BaristaParty hosted by Caf Europa, Copenhagen, 22 June 2008.

    Printed in England at the Gemini Press, Shoreham-by-SeaAddress all correspondence to:SCAE Secretariat, Oak Lodge Farm, Leighams Road, Bick-nacre, Chelmsford, Essex CM3 4HF, United Kingdom.Tel.: + 44 (0)1245 426060 Fax: + 44 (0)1245 426080E-mail: secretary@scae.com

    www.scae.com

    In this issue

    The Russian speciality coffee market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

    Coffee tour: Moscow & St. Petersburg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6

    Kofefest PIRSCAE 2008 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 -SCAE

    A short history of coffee in Ukraine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10

    The ibrik 1,001 recipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .14 1001

    Cezve/Ibrik champions Gleb Nevejkin and Nadezhda Motylkova . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18 /

    Serif Basaran Passionate Educator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20

    Coffee quality AND quantity speciality coffee solutions for filter coffee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21Coffee quality AND quantity speciality coffee solutions for filter coffee

    Gold Cup on course for a massive roll-out in 2009 . . . . . . . . . .26 Gold Cup 2009

    Growing SCAJ event chooses Okada as Barista Champion . . . . . .28 (SCAJ)

    Stephen Morrissey the 2008 World Barista Champion . . . . . . . .30 2008

    Swiss Coffee Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .34

    Round-up of international news . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35

    Index of Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

    Coffee Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44

  • , .

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    , 1990 , . , 98% . 80% , - 20% ( . 2007 ). , 3% , 30%.

    1990 . 30 , . 37 . : , ,, , , , , -. 5% . , . ( , ),

    The Soviet Union was predominantly a tea-drinking collection ofnations. However there wereexceptions, particularly thesouthern republics, and notablyArmenia and Georgia, wherecoffee consumption was consid-erably higher. During the Sovietperiod, the availability of goodquality coffee was limited.Import of green coffee was astate monopoly, and arabica wasmainly imported from friendlynations, particularly India. Thepreferred method of preparingcoffee at home was the turka(ibrik). In the lead-up to the1980 Olympic games, the SovietUnion began to import Italianespresso blends under thepatronage of the Italian Com-munist Party. At this time, theSoviet Union started to importprofessional espresso machines.However, training on how to usethese machines was limited atbest.

    After the end of the SovietUnion and during the transitionto a free market in the early1990s, private importers startedto import international brands ofinstant coffee to Russia. At thattime, the consumption of instantcoffee accounted for 98% oftotal coffee consumption inRussia. Today instant coffee isabout 80% and natural coffee20% (this statistic is from SFTtrading company at the end of2007). Overall, coffee consump-tion in Russia is growing:instant coffee at 3% per year,and natural coffee at 30%.

    Independent roastersemergeThe first independent roastersand importers of green coffeebegan to appear at the begin-ning of the 1990s. Today thereare about 30 small roasters inRussia that position themselvesin the speciality coffee segment.37 different types of green cof-fee are now imported into Rus-sia, the main origins beingBrazil, India, Vietnam, Colom-bia, Nicaragua, Ethiopia, Tanza-nia, Guatemala and Costa Rica.Of this, 5% is speciality coffee.All of this gives optimism thatthe speciality coffee movementhas got a foothold in the Russ-ian market. Imports of roastedcoffee continue to come intothe Russian market (mainlyfrom Italy, Spain and Switzer-land), and still supply up to80% of the Horeca market.However the move towardsquality gives reason to believethat in the next few years thesituation will change and con-sumers will turn towards fresh-roasted coffee. This will resultin an increase in the number oflocal roasters competing amongthemselves and driving qualityhigher. It is expected that thesame will happen with the retailmarket in the next 3-5 years,whereby locally roasted coffeewill replace imported roastedcoffee. While Moscow and StPetersburg have had a traditionof coffee drinking among theintelligentsia, the Russianregions were different. Accord-ing to Yuri Popov, the directorof the speciality coffee shop

    Coffee cultures

    Less than a generation ago, sellingspeciality coffee in Russia seemed adream, but times have changed. OurRussian chapter reports

    The Russian specialitycoffee market giant steps in a giant land

    Caf Europa Voice of the Speciality Coffee Association of Europe No. 35 2008 2

    Coffee lovers enjoying their drinks on a spring day, outsideone of Moscows Coffee House shops

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  • Coffeeshenk in Nizhny Nov-gorod: Historically NizhnyNovgorod was a centre of thetea trade, and tea was the pre-ferred drink in the restaurantsector: for every 20 cups of tea,only one cup of coffee wassold. However, over the last tenyears, the consumption of cof-fee has grown considerably.Today the proportion is 30%coffee to 70% tea. The numberof suppliers in the market hasalso increased where thereused to be two competitors,now we have seven competitorssupplying the Horeca segment,and there is room for more - themarket is growing at 30% peryear. Over the last ten years, wehave seen the sale of specialtycoffee through specialisedshops to the population growfive times.

    Local chainsThe first local chains of coffeeshops in Russia started toappear in the mid 1990s. In1996 the first Coffee Beanopened in Moscow, offeringclients a range of coffees fromdifferent origins, prepared indifferent ways. Clients couldalso buy roasted coffee to takehome. Over the years, the food

    menu grew to include cakes,sandwiches, quiche and otheritems. The chain now has shopsin eight cities around Russia.

    Coffee House opened itsfirst coffee shop in Moscow in1999. Now it is the biggest cof-fee shop operator in Russia,with more than 222 shopsaround Russia and the Ukraine.Coffee House started its ownproduction of roasted coffee in2007.

    Shokoladnitsa is currentlythe second biggest operator inRussia with 195 coffee shops ,and plans to open a further 100per year. In 2001, after carefulplanning,

    Coffeemania opened thefirst coffee shop in Moscow,which can truly be described asbeing speciality. Perfectionismto the smallest detail is the mainprinciple of the company, withtraining being at an unprece-dented level, using its owntraining centre: baristas are test-ed using WBC rules three timesa year, and since 2003 baristasfrom Coffeemania have wonkey places in SCAE worldchampionships six times. In

    HoReCa 80%. , , ( HoReCa) . , . , 3-5 .

    - , . , : : 20 1 . 10 . 30%