Brom Napoleonic Rules

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THE BROM NAPOLEONIC WARGAME RULES This is a version of the BROM STANDARD RULES specially "tweaked" for Napoleonic battles in the 1809/1812 period. When Larry Brom wrote these rules, he used made some design decisions that mean that this rules set is "out of the box" or different from most sets of Napoleonic rules. 1. There are no skirmishers. I once asked Mr. Bropm about this and he declared that "They are out there - skirmishing." By this, I THINK that he meant that they the skirmishers tended to cancel each other out. 2. The effect of the weapons does not decrease as the range increases. Larry believed that the weapon was either in range to do damage, or it was not. Fire at ranges too long to have an effect is just waste, so why go through the motions of rolling the dice? You can assume that there is a constant dribble of artillery rounds being fired at long range, knocking off a head or two here and there, but with no effect on the game. Infantry fire at long range has the same effect. Note that rifle fire is much longer ranged than musketry, but has the same effect, and that artillery does have a cannister range, as well as ball. 3. A unit checks morale EVERY time it takes any casualties? Yes! Although many players will not notice, this is a game of morale, not firepower. TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1 Game Preparation, Game Sequence. Section 2 Staff And Command, Troop Formations. Section 3 Movement, Infantry Fire, Artillery, Casualties. Section 4 Morale. Section 5 Close Combat. Section 6 Rear Attacks, Falling Back, Routing, Cavalry. Section 7 Terrain Restrictions; Movement Chart. Section 8 Firing Chart, Winning The Game, Terminating the Game, Computing Final Casualties. Section 9 Degree Of Defeat, Army Effectiveness. Section 10 Overhead Fire &, Enfilade Charts.

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This is a version of the BROM STANDARD RULES specially "tweaked" for Napoleonic battles in the 1809/1812 period.

Transcript of Brom Napoleonic Rules

THE BROM NAPOLEONIC WARGAME RULES

THE BROM NAPOLEONIC WARGAME RULESThis is a version of the BROM STANDARD RULES specially "tweaked" for Napoleonic battles in the 1809/1812 period. When Larry Brom wrote these rules, he used made some design decisions that mean that this rules set is "out of the box" or different from most sets of Napoleonic rules.

1. There are no skirmishers. I once asked Mr. Bropm about this and he declared that "They are out there - skirmishing." By this, I THINK that he meant that they the skirmishers tended to cancel each other out.

2. The effect of the weapons does not decrease as the range increases. Larry believed that the weapon was either in range to do damage, or it was not. Fire at ranges too long to have an effect is just waste, so why go through the motions of rolling the dice? You can assume that there is a constant dribble of artillery rounds being fired at long range, knocking off a head or two here and there, but with no effect on the game. Infantry fire at long range has the same effect. Note that rifle fire is much longer ranged than musketry, but has the same effect, and that artillery does have a cannister range, as well as ball.

3. A unit checks morale EVERY time it takes any casualties? Yes! Although many players will not notice, this is a game of morale, not firepower.

TABLE OF CONTENTSSection 1 Game Preparation, Game Sequence.Section 2 Staff And Command, Troop Formations.Section 3 Movement, Infantry Fire, Artillery, Casualties.Section 4 Morale.Section 5 Close Combat.Section 6 Rear Attacks, Falling Back, Routing, Cavalry.Section 7 Terrain Restrictions; Movement Chart.Section 8 Firing Chart, Winning The Game, Terminating the Game, Computing Final Casualties.Section 9 Degree Of Defeat, Army Effectiveness.Section 10 Overhead Fire &, Enfilade Charts.Section 11 1810 Data SheetAppendix - special "House to House" Rules

Updated as of 10/30/03

BASIC RULES FOR THE RANDOM MOVE COMMAND RESPONSE WAR GAME1. Game PreparationFor each army, prepare a Random Move Card for each Brigade of Infantry or Cavalry, one for the army's unattached Artillery batteries. Also, make one or two "Bonus" cards and a "Staff" card for each side. Shuffle all cards into one mixed deck.

2. Commencing the GameA. Build terrain, choose Armies and side of table.B. Hang curtain down center and place units anywhere 24". from tables edge. Units in woods, towns, or behind hills can be kept off as "concealed".C. Up to 1/3 of an Army can be off the table as "Reserves".To Enter, (By Brigades. only).

a. Announce at start of turn - mark entry point.

b. Can enter next turn when card is drawn.

c. Roll D10 when attempting to bring onto the table. 1-6 enter where marked. 7 = enter 24" to the left. 8 = enter 24" to the right. 9 = delayed, roll again next turn. 10 = delayed, roll again in two turns.

Move in one normal move from the entry point - no need to test command response when entering

3. The First Turn A. Turn over top card of shuffled Random Card deck. That Brig./ Div. can move if Staff Officer passes Command Response (See Chart).

B. A "bonus" card, that Commander can move any unit he chooses.

C. When all cards are turned, movement phase of turn is completed.

4. Game Turn Sequence:A. Turn over the top card of the Random Move Stack. That Brigade/Division, or Battery can move if its Commander rolls the proper Command Response Die. Keep turning cards until the stack has been run through. This completes the Movement Phase of the game turn.

B. Simultaneously fire all standing artillery, mark casualties, and check morale.

C. Simultaneously fire all moving artillery, mark casualties, and check morale.

D. Simultaneously fire all standing musketry, mark casualties. and check morale.

E. Simultaneously fire all moving musketry, mark casualties, and check morale.

F. Move all announced attacking' units into CLOSE COMBAT if their morale allows.

G. Check the morale of all defending units if their attackers close with them. If they stand, a CLOSE COMBAT occurs.

H. Fight all CLOSE COMBATS and determine results. Move any "routed" or "Falling Back" units and resolve any Close combats that resulted from "Bonus" moves.

I. Attempt to rally all "routed" units from the previous turn.

J. Determine each Armys' "Morale State" and act accordingly.

K. Re-shuffle Random Move Cards and commence next game turn.

MOUNTED STAFFA. Officers are either "Attached" to a unit (touching it) or they are "Unattached" (not touching any unit). B. Unattached Staff officers have a 12" "Command Response" radius, and influence all their units within that distance for Command Response, but not Morale. C. Attached Staff officers only influence the unit they are with, for both Morale and Command Response. RD. Army Commanders can influence any units. Other officers may only influence units under their command. E. Attached Staff officers, may be killed if the unit takes casualties due to fire or close combat. F. Unattached Staff officers cannot be fired at or engaged in close combat. They may be moved out of the way of enemy units. G. Staff officer attached to a unit which takes fire casualties, roll a D10. Result of 10 kills officer in addition to other casualties inflicted on the unit. H. Staff officer attached to a unit which takes casualties in melee, roll a D10. Result of 10 means officer killed or captured (even die roll captures, odd kills) in addition to other casualties inflicted on the unit. I. Staff officer attached to a unit which loses a close combat without any casualties, roll a D10. Result of 10 means officer captured. J. Staff involved in Rally attempt exercise no other command functions that turn. K. Unattached Staff move when "Staff" card is drawn. Attached officer moves when unit moves. He can move away from unit, thus becoming unattached. Staff react to the Morale roll of any unit they are attached to. They leave the field when their last unit leaves. .

6. Troop FormationsA. Legal Formations during a game are; Lines, Columns, Squares, and Dis-ordered.B. Units can change formations at the end of their move with no penalties.C. Units can move through friendly units with no disruptions to either.D. If Lines are deployed closer then 2" to each other (front to back) then both units test for casualties, but the rear unit is "in cover".

7. MovementA. Use variable Move dice for distance. (See Chart).B. All measuring is from front-center to front-center.C. No restrictions for changing Formations or Facing direction.D. Units must start on road and move the entire turn on the road to get the road bonus. E. Can move through friendly units with no ill effect to either.F. Mounting or dismounting - lose one D6 from movement dice.

8. Infantry FireA. All fire is by Battalions, two ranks of figures (not stands) only, 60 degree cone to the front.B. Elevated rearward units at least 3" behind another can fire overhead fire.C. Measuring is from base to base, front-center to nearest point of target.D. A unit is in range if one single figure is in range. E. Units partially masked by woods, town, hill etc may still be fired at. No more than the exposed part of the unit may become casualties. F. Infantry and Cavalry lines and deployed batteries take normal "hits" (see Firing Chart). Disordered (routed) units are as "in-cover". All other formations add 1 to "hit" numbers.G. Add or subtract the following dice:

Add two dice the first time that a unit fires in the game.

Subtract one die if the firing unit is Militia

See national notes for additional dice adds/subtracts

9. Artillery A. Artillery fire is by battery (all stands must be touching), direct line of sight, within a 60'cone to the front.

B. See Overhead Fire Graph for that type of fire.

C. 0n level ground all fire is at foremost target unit.

D. Batteries can be "spiked" anytime by rolling any number but a 6.

E. Falling Back artillery takes guns with them (except in woods or rough terrain).

F. Routed batteries leave their guns in place.

G. Abandoned guns can only be manned by artillerymen. Can be moved by anyone.

H. Batteries can pivot on their center without rolling Command Response for moving and are not considered to have moved.

10. Casualties A. Are consolidated onto one stand at owners choice, to his advantage.

B. B. Casualties may be shifted from one stand to another at "owning player's" whim.

C. Takes two hits to mark 1 artillery crew casualty.

11. Morale A. Roll 1 die and use Initial Morale Rating Chart to determine a units Basic Morale when first having to check Morale.Every unit's Morale rating is unknown till it's first Morale test

B. When to check Morale

At the end of each firing phase in which a unit takes casualties.

When attempting to Close Into Combat.

When attempting to Stand In Close Combat - any failure is HALT, nothing worse..

When a units' Staff Officer is killed or captured within 12" and in view (180 degree cone of observation).

When a unit loses a Close Combat - any failure is ROUT.

When a unit attempts to withdraw from a Close Combat as attacker moves in.

Routed units trying to rally - any failure is removal from battlefield.

When a friendly unit within 6" routs, or a unit routs THROUGH the unit, as caused by case a. c. or f. above.

When a unit attempts to support a friendly unit in a close combat - any failure is HALT, no support given, nothing worse.

C. To Check MoraleAdd number rolled on 6-sided die to units' current Morale rating.

D. Morale Results

6 or more - Morale Good, carry-on

5 - Moving unit halts (considered standing). Standing unit Falls Back. Falling Back unit Routs.

4 - Moving unit Falls Back. Standing or Falling Back units rout

3 - Unit Routs, attempt rally next turn.

2 - Unit Routs as above except, if loser in Close Combat, loser is captured.

1 - Unit routs from table if at least 1 full stand is gone.

E. Morale Altered Permanently

a. 1f a unit routs another by fire - raise Morale 1 point.

b. If a unit wins a Close Combat - raise Morale 1 point.

c. If a unit Routs due to enemy action - lower Morale 1 point

d. When a unit is less then 5O% strength - lower Morale 1 point.

F. Morale Altered Temporarily

a. Units in towns, forts, trenches, etc. -raise Morale 1 point.

b. Units in Square formation - raise Morale 1 point.

c. Staff attached to unit adds his Morale Bonus.

d. Units attacked in rear - lower Morale 1 point.

* ALL THESE MORALE ALTERATIONS ARE MADE INSTANTLY AS THE CAUSE OCCURS!

12. Close CombatA. Attacker moves units towards target units and halts 1' away. Cannot fire, but takes any defending fire and checks Morale. Any result of halt or worse precludes the unit from closing into a close combat

B. Attacker attempts to Close Into Combat with a Morale roll. if he fails, Stops 1" from target.

C. If attacker closes defender checks Morale and acts accordingly.

D. If Close Combat occurs, fight individual stands in combat (see Combat Factors Chart). Stands that lose with 1 or 2 on their die take that many casualties. Other losing stands just fall back.

E. When one side has fought all stands and lost all fights, he is the loser. The loser of Close Combat checks Morale. A 6 or more, he Falls Back in good order. Less than 6, loser Routs.

F. Attacker trying to Close and target is gone, can:

a. Occupy vacated position and reform or reface.

b. Pursue moved target if distance allows.

c. Attempt to Close on another target within 45 degree cone.

G. Defender can "support" any attacked unit within 4" by checking Morale. If morale failed, unit cannot support

H. All the stands of attacking units that Close get to fight and if any one stand of a defending unit is contacted, the whole defending unit fights.

I. Multi-unit Combats are fought in the sequence that they made contact.

J. Casualty stands of a unit fight last and subtract 1 from their die for each casualty.

K. Mounted Staff Officers fight after any troop stands in any Close Combat.

L When all Close Combats are resolved make all Morale adjustments, move losing units to new locations, check Morale of any Units that lost their Staff, and then take winners "Bonus Options".

a. Hold position.

Make non-combat tactical move of one normal move

Attempt another Close Combat by passing Morale Check and rolling variable move dice - announce intent first. (Defender can fire defensive volley if not already fired that turn).

M. Defending unit - that has not moved - can attempt to pull away from an attacker. Check morale if it fails, unit Routs.

N. Artillery batteries cannot support in Close Combat.

0. Infantry in Squares, towns, forts, etc. lose any formation or location bonuses if they move out to support any Close Combats.

P. Infantry in square need not test "to stand" if attacked by enemy cavalry.

Rear Attacks

A. Must start out of 180' observation cone.

B. Attacker need not check Morale.

C. Defender checks Morale at minus 1, if he fails, he Routs away from the threat direction. Can move through a 3" gap in enemy line. If no gap, unit surrenders.

14. Falling Back Units

A. Move directly to their rear a normal move distance plus 1 D6 of distance, and do not effect friendly rearward units. (take no terrain penalties).

B. If they collide with enemy units, roll Morale at minus 1 to see if they fight. If they do, they minus 1 from their die roll. If they fail,,with less then 6 Morale, they surrender.

C. Falling Back units are in that state until their next normal move.

15. Routed UnitsA. Move as Falling Back units above but a DOUBLE move distance. (mark new location with marker)

B. Any friendly units within 6" of Routers original location as well as any unit passed through must check Their Morale.

C. Routed units that collide with organized enemy are captured.

D. Routed units that take casualties from fire check Morale to stand in place. If not, rout again with all implications.

E. Routed units attacked in Close Combat automatically rout again (one die for casualties). Attacker gets no bonus.

F. At end of next game turn attempt to Rally routed units. If not,leave the table, out of the game.

G. Staff Officer must reach Rout Marker to aid in Rally attempt.

16. CavalryA. Standing Cavalry (didn't move on their last move attempt)fight Close Combat minus 1 on their die.

B. Squares versus Cavalry always stand and get a Combat Bonus.

C. Can mount or dis-mount in place or move up to 1/2 their move distance and still do so.

D. Only dis-mounted Cav. can fire unless stated differently in rules

E. Dis-mounted Cav. fight Combat as Infantry. Mounted Cav against towns, forts, etc. fights minus 1 from Combat die roll.

F. Cavalry MAY fire on a turn in which it dismounted no matter if it moved or did not.

G. Cavalry may not mount or dismount if command control die roll failed.

17. Terrain ConsiderationsA. All woods, towns, bridges, walls, etc. are considered ground level terrain. Hills are the only elevations.B. To see or fire over an obstacle - woods, towns, troop formations,etc. one must be on a forward slope (hills should be 'so marked) and the target must be 12' or more beyond said obstacle. (See Graph).C. Troops in woods, towns, or behind fences, walls, and hedges are considered "in cover" for firing purposes.D. All hills cause movement penalties and units on opposite sides of the "crest-line" cannot be seen or fired upon.

E. Woods 1. Cause movement penalties.

2. Troops at edge can fire into or out of and can be fired upon.

3. Troops within cannot be seen until viewer is at the edge. (Visibility and firing range inside woods is 6")

4 No artillery can move through woods, but it can be deployed at the edge, visible and capable of being fired upon (is in cover) and firing. If, however the crew ever falls back due to morale the guns must stand abandoned.

F. In Towns. 1. Troops inside are concealed until viewer is 6' away.

2. Units inside add 1 point to their current morale rating.

3. To enter unoccupied town, the unit must move up to the edge and stand for one full move during which they cannot fire. On their next move the whole unit can enter and line the walls.

4. To attack a Town in Close-Combat, the normal procedure is followed taking into consideration all morale and firing modifiers.

5. One-half of all the infantry stands in a Town can always fire out in any one direction, regardless of facing direction. Artillery can only fire in their facing direction.

6. To leave a Town, roll 2 movement dice and move out that distance. (measured from the center of the Town) in any direction and any formation.

MOVEMENT CHARTTYPELINECOLUMNROADWOODS, HILLSWATER

Infantry2 Dice3 Dice4 DiceLose low dieLose High Die

Light Inf.Same as above but no terrain modifiers

Heavy Cavalry4 Dice5 Dice6 DiceLose high dieLose low die

Light Cavalry5 Dice6 Dice7 DiceLose high dieLose low die

To mount or dismount, lose one Die

Mounted Staff6 Dice, No bonuses, No terrain penalty

Field ArtilleryMovement only = 3 diceMove &: fire = 2 Dice

Horse ArtilleryMovement only = 4 diceMove &: fire = 3 Dice

Artillery: Woods = not allowed, Hills, walls = lose high die, Water = lose low die

* WHEN THE SPECIFIED NUMBER OF DICE TO BE ROLLED ALL ROLL THE SAME NUMBER, NO TERRAIN PENALTY IS INCURRED.

FIRING CHARTFIRING UNITFORMATIONS IN OPENFORMATIONS IN COVERARTILLERY IN OPENARTILLERY IN COVER

Muskets4-5-65-65-66

Rifles5-65-65-66

Artillery4-5-65-65-66

INFANTRY FIRE: Roll 1 six-sided die for each firing troop stand. If you have separate "Decorative only" command stands, they do not fire. Above numbers "hit" and inflict 1 casualty on the target unit. Add 1 to the above "hit" numbers when firing on Columns, Squares, and Enfiladed lines. Troop stands with casualties on them may not fire.

ARTILLERY Ball To Fire: Roll 1 die for each artillerist in the battery firing. Discard "mis-fire" numbers (see below).

1810 - Guard Btys. all British, mis-fire with a 1, all others with a 1 or 2

Roll remaining dice again, hit as above, on Firing chart.

EXAMPLE - BALL: A Prussian battery of six cannon is represented on the table by three stands, each with a cannon and two artillerists. When the battery fires ball at a French infantry unit in line, 6 dice are rolled (one for each artillerist figure). The dice results are 5,4,4,3,2,1. The 1 and 2 are "mis-fire" numbers and are discarded. The remaining 4 dice are rolled again and the results are 6,5,3,2. Comparing these numbers to the firing chart above, we see that the 6 and 5 will hit "Formations in open", so two hits have been obtained on the Target unit of French infantry in line.

ARTILLERY Cannister, Shrapnel To Fire: Roll 1 die for each artillerist in the battery firing, plus one die for each gun in the battery. Hit as above, on Firing chart.

EXAMPLE - CANNISTER: A Prussian battery of six cannon is represented on the table by three stands, each with a cannon and two artillerists. When the battery fires cannister at a French infantry unit in line, 9 dice are rolled (one for each artillerist figure, and one for each gun). The dice results are 5,4,4,4 3,3,2,2,1. Comparing these numbers to the firing chart above, we see that the 5 and all three of the 4s will hit "Formations in open", so four hits have been obtained on the Target unit of French infantry in line.

20. Winning the GameAt the end of any game turn that one Army has no casualty-free fighting stands left on the table, that Army is the loser. If this situation occurs to each Army on the same turn it's a stalemate.

21. Terminating The GameThe above condition can be reached in two ways:

a. Both Armies fight on untill -due to "Routs" and "Retirements" - one Army dissolves.

b. One player voluntarily withdraws his forces from the field by normal game procedures to lessen his degree of defeat.

22. Computing Final Battle CasualtiesWhen the game ends, record on the casualty sheets the number of casualties in each Army thusly:

Count 1/2 the figures ringed as casualties as, Battle Casualties.

Count 1/2 the figures routed from the table as, Routed.

Count all the figures that were captured as, Captured. After totaling each Armys' casualties calculate the percentage for each.

23. Determinig the Degree Of DefeatIf the winners percentage is equal to, or excedes, the losers, the battle is considered a "useless Victory". However, for each 5 points the losers' casualties excede the winners, a greater Degree Of Defeat was sustained - as shown below.Losers casualties are:

1 to 5 points higher, loser sustained a MARGINAL DEFEAT

6 to 10 points higher, loser sustained a SUBSTANTIAL DEFEAT

11 to 15 points higher, loser sustained a MAJOR DEFEAT

16 or more points higher, loser stustained a DISASTROUS DEFEAT

24. Army Effectiveness A. At Start of the game, each commander will total the number of points in his army using the values below. At the end of each Game turn each Commander will total his remaining points using the same values. Divide the "at start" point total into the "end turn" point total. this will determine the value of the Army Effectiveness as a percentage of the "at start" value.

This will be reduced to a 10-digit number, rounding UP - this number will be called the Army Effectiveness Number . EXAMPLE - If the army has 91% of its points left, the army effectiveness number is 10. (always round UP). If the army has 78% of its points left, the army effectiveness number is 8. If the army has 54% of its points left, the army effectiveness number is 6.UNIT POINT VALUES Line Cavalry units = 3 points per unit

Guard Cavalry units = 4 points per unit

Line Infantry units = 2 points per unit

Guard Infantry units = 3 points

Militia Cavalry units = 2 points

Militia Infantry units = 1 point

All Batteries = 3 points,

Dead Generals = -5 points

Dead Commander in chief = -15 points

At the end of every Game Turn if the Army Effectiveness Number is less than 10, the commander in chief must roll a D10.

If the die result is less than the Army Effectiveness Number then the army's morale state is FIRM. Carry on normally!

If the die result is equal to the Army Effectiveness Number then the army's morale state is SHAKY. All units with 1 or more stands missing and Morale of 1 "Retire" off table. Any routed units remaining must make an immediate morale test (attached officers may add their bonus) and if this is failed, they leave the field.

If the die result is greater than the Army Effectiveness Number then the army's morale state is BROKEN. All units with 1 or more stands missing and Morale of 1 "Rout" off table. Any routed units leave the field. All remaining units with a stand missing lower their morale rating by one point.

Mounted Staff Morale bonuses do not apply in any of the above BROKEN morale determinations and Staff attached to units "Rout" or "Retire" with them.

OVERHEAD FIRE

All fire is direct line-of-sight.

To fire overhead, a gun must be on a higher level than the target ant the target must be 12" beyond any obstacle, (ie: friendly troop formations, hills, woods, and towns.)

all hits are always taken out of the foremost unit in the "Hit-Zone"

There is a 12" "Safe-Zone" just beyond any obstacle where no target can be hit.

ENFILADE FIRE - Enfilade fire is acquired when a 2" wide path from the center of, and perpendicular to, the firing unit passes over the head of every figure (including casualties) in the line - formation target unit.

1810 - NAPOLEONIC

COMMAND RESPONSE - Unit does not move if this number is rolled on a D10

Commanding General within 12"Automatic Response

Corps Commander within 12"10

Divisional General within 12"10-9

Brigadier General within 12"10-9-8

No higher officer within 12"10-9-8-7

NOTE: Each unit only tests ONCE on a Random move card to see if it can move. EXAMPLE: The first brigade has three battalions. The first and third battalions are within 12 of the Commander-in-Chief and will not have to test Command Response to move. The second battalion is a bit too far away, but is within 12" of both the Divisional Commander and Brigadier. The player rolls a D10 and tests to see if the Divisional commander can cause the unit to move. The result is 9, so that the unit will not move. There is no second test for command response using the Brigadier. Only the influence of the highest officer in range is used to test command response.

INITIAL MORALE RATING

Die roll (D6)

-1--2--3--4--5--6-

CLASS 1 - Guards and artillery233334

CLASS 2 - Elite Units222333

CLASS 3 - Line Units122233

CLASS 4 - Militia Units112223

NOTES ON UNIT CLASSIFICATION

FRANCE - Cavalry

CLASS 1 - Grenadiers a' Cheval, Guard Dragoons, Chasseurs a' Cheval, Polish and Dutch Guard Lancers, Line Carabiniers.

CLASS 2 - Cuirassiers, Hussars, Guard Gendarmes, Allied heavy Guard cavalry.

CLASS 3 - Dragoons, Chevauleger-Lancers, Allied heavy and light cavalry.

CLASS 4- Neopolitan and Spanish cavalry

FRANCE - Infantry

CLASS 1 - Old guard and "heavy" middle guard units. Most Artillery (Larry Brom LIKES artillery)

CLASS 2 - All other Guard units, Allied Guard infantry units. Some may consider the Swiss "Foreign" battalions in this class.

CLASS 3 - Line and Leger units, reliable allied infantry such as Poles and Italians. Most "Foreign" battalions, Spanish and Neopolitan artillery.

CLASS 4 - National Guard, Neopolitan and Spanish infantry, some "Foreign" battalions.

BRITAIN - Cavalry

CLASS 1 - Household Cavalry, Cavalry of the King's German Legion.

CLASS 2 - Dragoon guards, Dragoons,

CLASS 3 - Hussars and Light dragoons, Most Allied cavalry in the Waterloo campaign .

CLASS 4- Portuguese and Spanish cavalry

BRITAIN - Infantry

CLASS 1 - Guards, Rifles and Highlanders. Most Artillery (Larry Brom LIKES artillery)

CLASS 2 - Fusiliers, Marines, most line and light units, some Portuguese units (Cacadores?).

CLASS 3 - Portuguese units, many Allied units at Waterloo, Canadian fencibles.

CLASS 4 - Militia, "Foreign legion" units. Spanish line and guerillas. some allied units at Waterloo.

PRUSSIAN - Cavalry

CLASS 1 - Guard Cavalry, Colberg Dragoons

CLASS 2 - Cuirassiers, Hussars

CLASS 3 - Dragoons, Lancers, "National Cavalry", better Landwehr cavalry.

CLASS 4- Other Landwehr cavalry

PRUSSIAN - Infantry

CLASS 1 - Artillery (Larry Brom LIKES artillery)

CLASS 2 - Guards, Jaegers, Silesian Schutzen

CLASS 3 - Line and Fusilier units, Russo-German Legion, Reserve regiments. Free will jagers attached to line units, Landwehr units known to be "A cut above".

CLASS 4 - Landwehr

AUSTRIAN - Cavalry

CLASS 1 - Cuirassier units known to be "A cut above".

CLASS 2 - Cuirassiers, Hussars

CLASS 3 - Dragoons, Lancers, Chevauleger

AUSTRIAN - Infantry

CLASS 1 - Grenadiers if you wish. Artillery (Larry Brom LIKES artillery)

CLASS 2 - Grenadiers, any Line regiments known to be "A cut above", Tyrolean Jagers if you believe they were elite.

CLASS 3 - Line units, Jagers, Grenz units.

CLASS 4 - Militia, Hastily raised Jagers

RUSSIA - Cavalry

CLASS 1 - Heavy Guard Cavalry

CLASS 2 - Cuirassiers, orther Guard Cavalry, Hussars

CLASS 3 - Dragoons, Lancers, Mounted jaegers, Cossacks, line and guard.

CLASS 4- Some Cossacks known to be just looters

RUSSIA - Infantry

CLASS 1 - Heavy Guard units, Artillery (Larry Brom LIKES artillery)

CLASS 2 - Grenadiers, Light guard units.

CLASS 3 - Line regiments, Jagers, Marines, Russo-German legion.

CLASS 4 - Militia, Foot Cossacks

Weapon Ranges

Musket Range is 8"Rifle Range is 15"Carbine Range is 5"

Foot Gun Range is: SHOT = 36" CANNISTER = 12"

Horse Gun Range is: SHOT = 24" CANNISTER = 10"

NOTE: There is no weapons range attenuation. A unit is either within range to do some damage, or it is not.

Close Combat Factors

heavy Cav - Die No. +1, win tiesArtillery - Die no. +1

Guard Infantry - Die no. +1Line or light inf. - Die No.

Lancers - Die No. +1In Square - die no. +1

Mounted Staff - Die No. +1In towns - die no. win ties

Elite Infantry - Die no. +1Hit in Rear - Die no. -2

Light Cav - die no. win tiesFalling Back - die no. -1

Notes on the Units of the Napoleonic period

The following units are armed with Rifles

British rifles,

KGL Light Battalions (if you believe this - some sources say only part of the KGL light battalions had rifles)

Portuguese Cacadores

Prussian Jagers and Silesian Schutzen

American Riflemen

NATIONAL NOTES

AUSTRIA

Austrian Infantry columns move at line movement rates.

Austrians had a special anti-cavalry formation known as a "Mass". This was formed from the infantry column. All infantry columns are treated as being in square when involved in close combat with enemy cavalry, but unlike a square, must test "to stand" vs cavalry.

Austrian "Cavalry batteries" were not true horse artillery with ridden horses for each gunner. Therefore they should move as "Foot Artillery".

Austrian heavy cavalry was armored (Front cuirass and helmet). When fighting any unarmored heavy cavalry, it gets a +1 to the close combat die.

BRITAIN

British "Light Cavalry" was really heavy cavalry in most respects. They should use the heavy cavalry movement rates, and fight as heavy.

British batteries can fire shrapnel shell. This give much the same effect as cannister, but over longer ranges. Roll a D6 when a British battery wishes to fire Shrapnel Shell, if the result is 3,4,5,6 then it may fire Shrapnel shell. If the result is 1 or 2, it is temporarily out of Shrapnel and must fire ball or cannister.

British line and light infantry were the best marksmen and had the highest rate of fire in Europe. They add two dice to the normal number of dice rolled when firing muskets. Well trained Portuguese infantry may be given this benefit if you wish.

RUSSIA

Russian cossacks take no terrain penalties when moving uphill, downhill, through woods, across streams, etc. However, they will only close into close combat, or stand for close combat if they roll a natural "6" on the die. Any other result is a "Retire". Note that this does not affect situations in which they do not need to test, such as attacking from the rear and attacking routed units.

The Russian infantry's musketry was poor. Roll one less firing dice at all times when they fire than other nationalities would roll.

Russian heavy cavalry was armored (Front and back cuirass and helmet). When fighting any unarmored heavy cavalry, it gets a +1 to the close combat die. Some regiments were unarmored, if you don't know which, you may treat all the Cuirassiers and heavy guards as armored.

PRUSSIA

The Prussian Guard du Korps heavy cavalry may have been armored (Front and back cuirass and helmet). When fighting any unarmored heavy cavalry, it gets a +1 to the close combat die. If you believe that the line Cuirassiers were armored, you may treat them the same. I don't believe that they were.

ORGANIZATIONAL NOTES

The Jackson gamers have used several Napoleonic organizations, and find that these rules work well with all of them. Currently we use a modified "Napoleon's Battles" organization.

The key - O represents an infantryman, [] represents a cavalryman, I represents a gun, and o represents an artilleryman.

Most Infantry Battalions have 6 stands

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

Austrian Infantry Battalions have 8 stands

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

Most cavalry Regiments have 6 stands

[] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] []

Most artillery batteries have 3 stands

o I o o I o o I o

French and Russian artillery batteries have 4 stands

o I o o I o o I o o I o

We have also played with Infantry Battalions organized like this:

O O O O O O O O O O O O

O O O O O O O O O O O O

And with 4-stand Battalions - With this orgainization, we let each stand have two die rolls when firing if it had no casualties and one die roll if it did have casualties. When it has less than 3 figures remaining, it may no longer fire. You may allow each stand two die rolls in close combat. Treat each stand as two three-man stands that happen to be glued together.

O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O O

Some people have their cavalry organized like this. This can be played with no change to the rules.

[] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] []

Some people have their cavalry organized like this. Cavalry with four-man stands should get a close combat die roll for the the "first 2" men on the stand, and a second die roll for the "second 2 men". In essence, you will treat the 4-man cavalry stand as being two (2-men each) stands that just happen to be glued together..

[] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] []

Treat this exactly as the example above.

[] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] []

The old Vietmeyer organization had some nations' cavalry on five-man stands. If you have this organization, Each stand will get a close combat die roll for the the "first 2" men on the stand, and a second die roll for the "second 3 men". You will treat the 5-man cavalry stand as being two stands (a 2-man stand, along with a 3-man stand) that cannot be separated.

[] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] [] []

If you have individually mounted cavalry, merely group the figures into pairs. Each pair receives one die roll in close combat. Odd figures left over may fight at -1 to the close combat die.

[] []

LIGHT BATTALIONS

Larry Brom used Light and Rifle battalions as faster-moving units (no terrain penalties) with, in the case of the rifles, a longer firing range. They were not assumed to be skirmishers. This is an excellent way to play the game.

Players who wish may break up battalions of legere, jagers, cacadores, schutzen, rifles etc. and assign one or two stands to line battalions. This increases the firepower and ability to take casualties of the battalions to which they are attached. This represents the thick screen of skirmishers that would be out in front of those units.

Note that rifle stands, attached to musket armed battalions, retain the increase fire range of the rifle. It is possible for the attached rifle stand to be in range and firing, but the "host" battalion is still out of range.

Light battalions or rifles may also be assigned wholy or in part to defend certain terrain features, such as farms or enclosed orchards. The game master may designate a feature as being able to hold a "Detachment" of three stands or two stands of troops. Light troops must be used as the "Detachments" garrisoning these features. The rules do not normally allow breaking up line battalions.

GUARD BATTALIONS

Larry Brom only had two categories of infantry battalions in his armies. Guard, and not-guard. Most Napoleonic enthusiasts can wax eloquent as they describe the varing types of guard regiments (especially under the Emperor of France). Old guard, Middle guard, Young Guard, Chasseurs a' Pied, Grenadiers a' Pied, Chasseur-Grenadiers, Flanquer-Grenadiers, Fusilier-Grenadiers...Enough!

When you set your game up, fit the guards as you please into class 1, class 2, class 3 or (Heaven forbid!) class 4.line. Use my suggestions or not - you won't hurt my feelings. However, below are a few things to think about - my opinions again:

French "Young Guard" were the pick of the conscripts with no extra training. They were probably as good as a good legere battalion.

The French "Old Guard" didn't really fight much. Perhaps you should not even allow them on the table - the Emperor is keeping them as his last reserve.

The Austrian Grenadier battalions were picked men, much like the French Heavy Guard infantry. They should be about equal to them, but they probably had more combat experience after being picked for the elite units.

Aside from having increased numbers, the British Guards were probably equal to the experienced line battalions, which was good indeed. Fusiliers and Marines likewise, except for their funny hats. Highlanders would have the same rating.

I don't know enough about the Prussian Guards or the Russian Guards to advise you.

Spanish or Neapolitan guard units would be equal to their line, and that is not terribly good.

ROCKETS

Every British gamer MUST have a rocket battery in his army. I have one too. Most people have fairly complex rules regulating how the rockets danced around the sky and occasionally hit a unit. Sometimes, it was even an enemy unit. These take up a lot of time and effor when you "fire" the thing and after a while it is tiresome. Larry Brom was smart enough not to have a rocket battery in his army. Here are several levels of Rocket rules, increasing in complexity:

1. Treat a rocket battery as a horse battery with no ability to fire cannister. This is the simplest way and will not slow your game down. One shot per gunner on the battery.

2. Treat as a horse artillery battery for movement, range, and effect.

No "mis-fires", no cannister.

Weapon has no penetration (units to the rear of target cannot be affected).

When firing rocket, roll a D10.

1,2 = rocket fizzes backward and hits one of your own units (your opponent chooses which one)

3,4,5 = rocket's erratic flight hits another enemy unit (you choose which one).

6,7,8,9 = rocket hits the intended target,

10 = rocket goes straight up and explodes in air. Intended target applauds the "fireworks show".

After finding the unit hit, roll 1 D6 per gunner on battery for effect. Use regular "Hit Table".

3. The rocketeer guesses the distance to target & then that spot is measured & the intended flight path marked to the target unit.

Roll two D10 dice and sum the total. That is how far the rocket flies along the premeasured course.

The roll a D6 to determine rockets' behavior:

0. Goes straight ahead

1. Goes 90 degrees to right

2. Goes 90 degrees to left

3. Goes straight backwards

4. Blows up right there.

5. Blows up right there.

1. If a 1-4 is rolled on the D6, then again roll two D10 dice and sum the total. That is how far the rocket flies on that course.

1. If the explosion marker comes up it blows up where it is.

1. If not, continue as above till it blows up somewhere. Any enemy unit within 2" of explosion must test for casualties. Roll a d6 & 1-4 causes that many casualties, 5 & 6 cause no casualties.

1. There is no range. If the rocketeer can see it, he can shoot at it.

1. Any cavalry unit, of either side ,overflown by the rocket must test morale. Failure means to fall back.

1. Only one rocket per battery per turn using this method.

SKIRMISHERS

While Larry Brom did not design his game to include skirmish figures, some gamers MUST have their Skirmishers. To reflect this, the following rules are included as AN OPTION. Please note that these are Rules Heresy to the true Larry Brom purist!

Each Infantry battalion (unless known to NOT have skirmishers) may replace one 4-man stand with four individually mounted figures. This may be done at the start of the game or at any time in which no enemy units are within 12". Once deployed, these skirmishers may never be rallied. No further skirmishers may ever be deployed from that battalion, after the original four.

The job of skirmishers is to shield their battalion from enemy skirmishers. Any battalion firing THROUGH enemy skirmishers rolls only half the dice which it would otherwise roll.

Skirmishers may not move more than 12" from their "parent" battalions.

Skirmishers will always shoot at enemy skirmishers instead of any other target. Skirmishers fire simultaneously and before any other fire.

After Skirmisher fire, skirmishers that are outnumbered two to one by enemy skirmishers must fall back behind their "Parent" battalions or 12".

Skirmishers may not come within 6" of enemy formed battalions, regiments, or batteries. Any formed enemy units may "force them back" as they move forward.

Formed units may fire through their own skirmishers without harming them. It is assumed that they are controlling the skirmishers and altering them by bugles, whistles, drums or other field signals.

Each Skirmisher rolls a D6 when firing at enemy skirmishers, hitting on 5 or 6.

Skirmishers may not fire on formed troops if there are any enemy skirmishers in range. If the Skirmishers must fire on formed troops, they hit with a 5 or 6 on a D6, one die per man firing.

Fire targeted at the Skirmisher's "parent unit" will not have any effect on the Skirmishers.

If their "parent unit" is charged by enemy infantry, the skirmishers will move to the rear of their parent unit to await the outcome. Each man must roll a D6 as he moves to the rear, and on a result of 6, he is "Lost and Separated" and is removed from the game.

If their "parent unit" is charged by enemy cavalry, the skirmishers will move to the rear of their parent unit to shelter and await the outcome. Each man must roll a D6 as he moves to the rear, and on a result of 5 or 6, he is "Lost and Separated" and is removed from the game.

If a battalion falls back it's skirmishers fall back with it.

If a battalion routs, it's skirmishers are lost and removed from the game.

If skirmishers achieve a 2-1 ratio against enemy skirmishers, the enemy skirmishers must fall back to the rear of their parent formation, immediately. This is "winning the skirmisher battle" allowing your own battalion to pour fire at the enemy while still shielding your parent battalion.

4. Revised Game Turn Sequence: when using Skirmishers

A. Turn over the top card of the Random Move Stack. That Brigade/Division, or Battery can move if its Commander rolls the proper Command Response Die. Keep turning cards until the stack has been run through. This completes the Movement Phase of the game turn.

*. Simultaneously fire all skirmishers, mark casualties, and test comparative skirmisher strength with enemy skirmishers

B. Simultaneously fire all standing artillery, mark casualties, and check morale.

C. Simultaneously fire all moving artillery, mark casualties, and check morale.

D. Simultaneously fire all standing musketry, mark casualties. and check morale.

E. Simultaneously fire all moving musketry, mark casualties, and check morale.

F. Move all announced attacking' units into CLOSE COMBAT if their morale allows.

G. Check the morale of all defending units if their attackers close with them. If they stand, a CLOSE COMBAT occurs.

H. Fight all CLOSE COMBATS and determine results. Move any "routed" or "Falling Back" units and resolve any Close combats that resulted from "Bonus" moves.

I. Attempt to rally all "routed" units from the previous turn.

J. Determine each Armys' "Morale State" and act accordingly.

K. Re-shuffle Random Move Cards and commence next game turn.

NATIONAL NOTES Concerning SKIRMISHERS

AUSTRIA

Austrian Infantry units did not have integral skirmishers, as far as I know. If you believe that they did, allow each battalion to send out one stand as skirmishers.

In place of the battalon skirmishers, the Austrian player may break up one or two Jaeger battalions, assigning a four-man company as skirmishers to each infantry battalion.

Other skirmishers may be allowed by the game master.

PRUSSIA 1815

Prussian Infantry units did have integral skirmishers, quite a few of them. WITH the permission of the game master, the Prussian line battalions can each delploy TWO stands as skirmishers.

In addition to the battalon skirmishers, the Prussian player may break up one Jaeger battalions, assigning a one or two men to strengthen the "battalon" skirmishers for each infantry battalion.

Other skirmishers may be allowed by the game master.

RUSSIA Russian Infantry units have very few integral skirmishers.. WITH the permission of the game master, the Russians may break up two Jaeger or Guard Jager battalions, assigning a four-man company to skirmisher for some of the line or Grenadier infantry battalions.

Other skirmishers may be allowed by the game master.

FRANCE

French Infantry units had integral skirmishers. In addition to them, the French player can break up two Young Guard battalions, assigning a one or two men to strengthen the "battalion" skirmishers for each infantry battalion.

Others skirmishers may be allowed by the game master.

BRITAIN

British Infantry units did have integral skirmishers. In addition to the battalion skirmishers, the British player may break up as many as three light or rifle battalions, assigning a up to four men to strengthen the "battalon" skirmishers for each infantry battalion.

Others skirmishers may be allowed by the game master.

PORTUGAL

The Portuguese player may break up as many as two cacadore battalions, assigning a up to four men to strengthen the "battalon" skirmishers for each infantry battalion.

There is some evidence that later war Portuguese line battalions had integral skirmishers. If you believe this, you may allow one company from each battalion to skirmish.

Others skirmishers may be allowed by the game master.

THE RECONAISSANCE RULE MODULEThis rules module was originally part of the BROM STANDARD RULES, but was removed in a 1979 revison. While intended to be used the the BROM STANDARD RULES, it would work very well with the BROM NAPOLEONIC RULES. It leads to a sometimes lengthy sub-game played out before the majority of the troops are on the table. Each side has a decision to make about the function and duties of the advance guard.

1. Should it attempt to seize and hold ground to allow the deployment, as far forward as possible, of the Main Body and Rear Guard of it's own army?

2. Or should it attempt to exit the enemy's table edge, to gain knowledge of the entry point and the arrival time of the rest of the enemy army?