Becoming a Data-Driven Organization

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Becoming a Data-Driven Organization. LIFELONG LEARNING 2007 GREG MARSELLO. Too many decisions in lifelong learning organizations are made today using the wrong approach. It not only leads to the wrong decisions being made, but it also actually takes more time to make the wrong decisions. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Becoming a Data-Driven OrganizationLIFELONG LEARNING 2007 GREG MARSELLO

  • Too many decisions in lifelong learning organizations are made today using the wrong approach. It not only leads to the wrong decisions being made, but it also actually takes more time to make the wrong decisions.

  • The Wrong ApproachThe wrong approach usually involves a number of people making the decision, with the decision based more on the opinions of those people rather than the data.

  • Use a data-driven decision-making approach if you are making decisions on:Activities to offer Teachers or presentersBudgetingPricingCanceling coursesPromotionMarketingLength of timeCourse/event formatLocationBrochure copy or any other programmatic or marketing kinds of decisions.

  • The Wrong WayThe wrong way is to make program and marketing decisions based on:Opinion. Many decisions are based on one or more persons opinion, rather than the actual facts and data.Consensus. Group decisions often try to achieve consensus, more to preserve the group cohesiveness than to make the right decision.

  • The Wrong WayPersonality. The personality of a leader may move a decision in a certain direction. Other personalities, from those who talk a lot to those with purchasing power to those with seniority, often have undue influence.Group morale. Some decisions are actually made more to maintain group morale than to make the right decision. One person might gain deference on a given decision because s/he has not won another decision, or certain persons feel left out, or a given decision makes everyone feel better.

  • Meetings Bad* Committee generally bad* Staff meetings badIt takes time toPlanConveneMake sure everyone has arrivedDo introductions and pleasantriesDistribute informationConsider exceptionsHandle diversionsIgnore interruptionsMake decisions.

  • The time spent in meetings, furthermore, takes time away from actually doing the programming and the marketing. Group decision making takes longer, and often deadlines are missed, causing a decrease in registrations.

  • The Right Way & PersonThe right way is to make data-driven decisions based on:Customer behaviorCustomer evaluationsCustomer demographicsPrevious historyOther data.

  • The Right Way & PersonThe right person to make these decisions is the person who has the:Most information, and/orBest information.

    In almost all programming and marketing circumstances, there is one person who has access to or experience with previous history and more data than anyone else. That person should make the decision.

  • When Groups HelpThe rare circumstances when groups make better decisions than individuals.

    These almost always involve:High dollars, those decisions involving $100,000 or more High risk, those decisions with little or no previous history, often involving precedent-setting or new activities. Little or no data, where there is little or no data available from which to make a data-driven decision.

  • When Groups Help In these situations, groups often make better decisions than individuals. But these circumstances do not apply to most day-to-day, session-to-session, or event decision making for most programmatic and marketing decisions.

  • Redefine Decision-Making AuthorityAssign responsibility. For every ongoing and regular decision involving programming and marketing, assign a person to make the decision. This often can be written into a persons job description. It can also be conveyed verbally or with a simple email.

  • Redefine Decision-Making AuthorityDevelop levels. Mentally, devise a dollar scale of decision making. For example, front line staff can make decisions up to $100 for such things as purchasing, refunds, discounts, and exceptions to rules. Professionals make decisions up to $10,000 for such things as courses/ events, instructor pay, promotion costs, and so on. Executives are involved in decisions over $10,000.

  • Redefine Decision-Making AuthorityNo precedent setting. Staff understands they cannot make decisions which are precedent setting.Decision guidelines. By your decision making, by your reporting and staff briefings, by sharing of information, and by demanding information, you make it clear that decisions are to be data-driven, based on customer behavior, participant evaluations, customer demographics, and other data.

  • Redefine Decision-Making AuthorityTrust. Initially, top executives will need to trust the decisions made by staff. After a while, most staff will develop data-driven judgment and decision-making skills, and you can take corrective action with those people not making good decisions.

  • Redefine Decision-Making AuthorityAdvocate and object. If you are asked to serve on a decision-making committee, advocate for data-driven decision making by one or two individuals, document the inefficiencies of the committee, and mentally keep track of the bad decisions made for the next committee assignment. Advocate for data-driven decisions.

  • Use a data-driven decision-making approach if you are making decisions on:Activities to offer Teachers or presentersBudgetingPricingCanceling coursesPromotionMarketingLength of timeCourse/event formatLocationBrochure copy or any other programmatic or marketing kinds of decisions.

  • Data to CollectDemographics: RegistrationPromotion Method: Registration/During ActivityEvaluations: During Activity/Spot CheckCosts: InvoicesPreferences: Surveys

    Not best to collect all data at same touch-point.

  • DemographicsAddressBirth YearGenderOccupationJob Title

    Best that you determine occupation and job title.

  • Promotion MethodDistribution MethodMailing ListSnail or ElectronicMailing 1, 2, 3Word of MouthWeb Site

  • EvaluationsSatisfactionTeacher/PresenterNew Activities

  • Model Programmer Course Evaluation FormCourse__________________Teacher__________________Programmer Evaluation. At the conclusion of the above course, the following information should be generated. A copy should be passed on to your supervisor, a copy should be put in the teachers file and a copy should be put in the course file.

    A. Student Evaluations1. Overall, were you satisfied with the course? ____ YES ____NO2. Fill in your response to the following questions: 1very poor, 2needs improvement, 3okay, 4good, 5excellentUnderstood the subject matter._____ Was well prepared for each session._____Made the goals and objectives clear at course. _____ Stimulated discussion and group involvement._____ Provided individual help when needed._____

  • 3. Comments. On a separate sheet of paper, list key comments on what participants liked about the course and improvements they suggested.4. Testimonials. On a separate sheet of paper, list key testimonials along with the persons name. Make sure to hold their evaluation form on file because it has their signature approving the use of their testimonial.

    B. Teacher Evaluation1. Overall, were you satisfied with the course? ____ YES ____NO2. Fill in your response to the following questions: 1very poor, 2needs improvement, 3okay, 4good, 5excellentWas the organizations staff helpful? _____Was your room prepared for your course?_____Did the learning environment meet your needs?_____Did the description clearly outline your course?_____Did your programmer give you feedback?_____

  • 3.Comments. On a separate sheet of paper, list key comments on what teachers liked about the course and what improvements they suggested.4. Testimonials. On separate paper, list key testimonials along with the teachers name. Make sure to hold their evaluation form on file because it has their signature approving the use of their testimonial. C. Performance Analysis1. Price of the Course _____2. Total Registrations _____3. Total Withdrawals_____4. Total Income (after withdrawals) _____5. Total Cost of Promotion _____

    *If there was additional promotion beyond the catalog listing, attach a copy to this evaluation. *To figure the promotional cost of a course in a catalog, divide the total cost of the catalog (desktop, printing, mail, etc.) by the number of courses.

  • 6. Total Cost of Production (instructor fee, materials, space) _____7. Total Direct Costs (5 + 6) _____8. Operating Margin (4 5 + 6) _____

    D. Half-Life: The number of weeks/days prior to the course when 50% of registrations were generated _____

    E. Participant Analysis Report. On separate paper, breakdown the students demographics: Age, Sex, Geography, Education Level.

    F. Programmer Evaluation1. Overall, were you satisfied with the course? _____2. Rate the teacher on the Likert Scale (15)_____3. What action steps would you take to improve this course?

  • CostsPromotionProductionAdministration

  • PreferencesWhatever You Need to KnowMore Surveys, Not Less

  • The Language You Should Be SpeakingRepeat RateLifetime ValueOperating MarginCancellation RateBrochure:Participant Ratio or Response RateStaff ProductivityAverage ParticipantsAverage FeeSatisfaction LevelDevelopment CostsGo/No Go PointPromotion Cost:Income Ratio

  • Making It HappenLERN Program Planner ToolLERN Contract Training ToolLERN Segmenting ToolWeb-Based Software

  • 80/207 Primary Market SegmentsPush Down Data Analysis

  • Dig DeeperAnalysis by market segment involves taking each of your market segments or primary customer audiences and analyzing sales.

  • Total sales by market segmentWhat is my top market segment by sales? What are my four top market segments by sales? My four top market segments are what percent of total sales? My next three top market segments are what? What mark