Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina...

of 73 /73
Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report Final Report

Embed Size (px)

Transcript of Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina...

Page 1: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Argyll and Bute Council

Campbeltown Loch Marina

Technical and Feasibility Report

Final Report

Page 2: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business
Page 3: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 \\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited

2212959

Unit 3 Kew Court Pynes Hill Rydon Lane Exeter EX2 5AZ United Kingdom

Tel: +44 (0)1392 374 600

Fax: +44 (0)1392 374 555

www.hyderconsulting.com

Argyll and Bute Council

Campbeltown Loch Marina

Technical and Feasibility Report

Final Report

Author G Green & J Prescott

Checker J Prescott

Approver I George

Report No 5000-UA002297-DVR-04

Date 22 February 2011

This report has been prepared for Argyll and Bute Council in accordance with the terms and conditions of

appointment for Technical and Feasibility Report dated 11 August 2010. Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited (2212959) cannot accept any responsibility for any use of or reliance on the contents of this report by any third party.

This feasibility study is part-financed through the Sail West maritime tourism initiative funded through the European Union INTERREG IVA Programme for Northern Ireland, the

Border Region of Ireland and Western Scotland managed by the Special EU Programmes Body.

Page 4: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 \\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Page 5: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page i\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

CONTENTS

1 Executive Summary .......................................................................... 1

2 Introduction ....................................................................................... 5

2.1 Project Background ........................................................................... 5

2.2 Project Objectives of the Scheme ...................................................... 6

2.3 Study Brief ........................................................................................ 6

2.4 Acknowledgements ........................................................................... 7

2.5 Other Projects within Campbeltown ................................................... 8

2.6 Existing Marina Facilities and Amenities ............................................ 9

3 Review of Existing Information ........................................................ 13

3.1 Historic Charts ................................................................................ 13

3.2 Geotechnical Investigations ............................................................. 14

3.3 Harbour Surveys ............................................................................. 16

4 Technical Review of Marina Proposals ............................................ 21

4.1 Marina Layout ................................................................................. 22

4.2 Wave Climate ................................................................................. 23

4.3 Dredging Works .............................................................................. 24

4.4 Stability of Harbour Structures ......................................................... 25

5 Operational Review of Marina Proposals ......................................... 27

5.1 Existing Harbour Activities ............................................................... 27

5.2 Vessel Movements .......................................................................... 28

5.3 New Marina Impacts on Harbour Operations .................................... 29

6 Marina Business Review ................................................................. 31

6.1 Market Review ................................................................................ 31

6.2 Demand Projection.......................................................................... 32

6.3 Market Requirements ...................................................................... 33

7 Discussion of Marina Proposals....................................................... 35

8 Marina Proposal Design Development ............................................. 37

8.1 Marina Layout Options .................................................................... 37

8.2 On Shore Masterplan ...................................................................... 44

8.3 Dredging and Construction Works ................................................... 46

8.4 Maintenance Works ........................................................................ 46

8.5 Construction Cost Estimates............................................................ 47

8.6 Initial Business Case ....................................................................... 49

Page 6: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page ii\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

9 Implementation ............................................................................... 53

9.1 Licenses and Consents ................................................................... 53

9.2 Construction Programme ................................................................. 57

9.3 Funding .......................................................................................... 57

9.4 Procurement, Operations and Management ..................................... 57

10 Consultation .................................................................................... 59

10.1 Local Stakeholder Consultation ....................................................... 59

10.2 Technical Workshop ........................................................................ 59

10.3 Licensing and Approval Initial Comment .......................................... 61

11 Conclusions .................................................................................... 63

12 Recommendations .......................................................................... 65

13 References ..................................................................................... 67

Appendices Appendix A

Historic Admiralty Charts

Appendix B

Original Marina Layout Proposal

Appendix C

Wave Modelling Report

Appendix D

Sediment Testing Results and Marine Scotland Action Levels

Appendix E

Harbour Wall Condition Survey

Appendix F

Dive Survey Report

Appendix G

Revised Marina Layout Options 1A and 2A

Appendix H

Revised Marina Layout Option 2B

Appendix J

On-shore Masterplan

Appendix K

Budget Cost Estimate

Appendix L

Initial Marina Business Case

Appendix M

Technical Workshop Questions and Answers

Appendix N

Consultation Responses

Page 7: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 1\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

1 Executive Summary Argyll and Bute Council have appointed Hyder Consulting, in association with DTZ, to undertake a Technical and Feasibility Study of a new marina at Campbeltown. The study was commissioned to assess the technical issues, operational constraints and the initial business case for a new marina. The objective of this study is to allow the Council to assess the case to proceed to Full Business Case.

The study has reviewed the information and data pertaining to this project. The information has been obtained from Argyll & Bute Council, CLBC, the Harbour Master and discussion with numerous stakeholders. This information has included site information (borehole records, topographic and bathymetric surveys, condition surveys, as-built drawings of related structures), proposals for other projects in the harbour area, operational use of the harbour and the current operations and business of the CLBC.

Using this information a technical, operational and commercial market assessment has been undertaken of the proposals for a new marina at Campbeltown (based on the Option 4 proposal recommended by the Campbeltown Options Appraisal report prepared by Scott Wilson). Initially some changes were made to the marina layout in order to comply with current best practice in marina design.

However, the initial business case review has projected insufficient demand to fill a 145 berth marina. The best estimate of demand for 2020 requires only 57 berths (current capacity is 18 berths with rafting potential to around 40 boats.

The reduced size marina will require less land take than originally proposed. Therefore, there are two potential locations for the new marina; one in the harbour, the second north of the Old Quay.

The wave modelling assessment has found the wave climate within the harbour to be less sheltered than north of the Old Quay. However for both marina locations additional protection would be required, by a breakwater or similar structure.

The technical review found that dredging would be required in both locations. The sediment sampling and testing found that some contaminants are present in the sediments in both areas. However these are between Action Level 1 and Action Level 2. Marine Scotland have advised that the samples raise relatively little contamination concerns. However, they recommend that more extensive core samples be taken to determine whether sea disposal is appropriate for the dredged sediments.

Dredging and construction of a new marina within the harbour would require construction of toe protection works to the Hall Street harbour wall (Wall O) and, due its current condition, replacement of the Old Quay harbour wall (Wall A).

The operational review found that the proposed marina in the harbour would impede use of the Old Quay. This quay is currently used for berthing fishing vessels up to two deep alongside the quay.

Although the original marina proposal north of the Old Quay conflicted with the Scottish Water buried pipeline and outfall, the revised number of berths would require less seabed area and therefore not extend as far as the buried pipeline.

It is recommended that the area north of the Old Quay is the best location for the new marina.

Page 8: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 2\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Two marina layout options (1A and 2A) were prepared to assess the best pontoon arrangement. During consultation with the Harbour Master it was identified that the location of the floating breakwater in Option 1A would restrict the use of the Fish Quay and Fuel Berth. Therefore for operational reasons Option 2A was preferred.

These layouts were also tested in the numerical wave model, which showed that under normal operating conditions (1 in 5 yr return period event) the wave climate design standard would not be met. However under an extreme event (1 in 50yr return period) the wave conditions would not meet the design standard.

As a result of this assessment, a further option (2B) was developed. This option utilises a piled wavescreen to provide the required wave climate in the marina to suit current design standards. It also incorporates improvements that were identified during the Technical Workshop.

On operational and technical grounds, Option 2B is recommended as the preferred option. The budget cost estimate for the construction for this option is £2,664,460 including 30% ‘optimism bias’ and design fees, but excluding VAT.

For longer term capacity planning, the design of Option 2B has in-built flexibility to accommodate a cost-effective extension to the marina. With an estimated capital cost of only £70k, an additional 12 berths can be provided increasing capacity from 45 to 57 berths.

The proposals include the provision of marina facilities, including an office, showers, toilets and laundry facilities, and improved public realm on the Old Quay. However, this area is at risk of tidal flooding and therefore mitigation measures may be required.

The cost estimates prepared for this study are based on the assumption that the seabed material is suitable for dredging by excavator and that all dredged material will be disposed at sea, at the Campbeltown disposal site.

As part of the initial business review, a financial business model has been prepared for the proposed marina. The model shows that it is not possible for the new marina to be self financing. The financial model demonstrates that neither the capital costs nor an allowance for depreciation are fundable. Even in the most optimistic scenario there is an NPV of -£169k when capital costs are excluded and depreciation included.

This analysis indicates that there is no commercial rationale for investment and that the project is not commercially viable.

However, if capital costs and depreciation charges are excluded the ‘best estimate’ scenario indicates a positive NPV of £42k. The level of profitability is marginal for the best estimate scenario with discounted profit only averaging around £2k per annum.

In accordance with CHORD governance, this project is being assessed from a business perspective and therefore the NPV analysis cannot be considered without capital costs and depreciation. Therefore, in order for the project to proceed it would be necessary to identify funding sources for the capital cost. Identification of additional income or operational cost savings during the lifecycle of the project will also improve the commercial viability of the project.

Alternatively, cost savings may be achieved by undertaking a value engineering workshop. The workshop attendees should include key stakeholders who have a direct influence in the scheme and harbour operations. Options will be assessed that provide savings in the whole life of the scheme, which may have implications on the operational use of the marina or harbour.

Page 9: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 3\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Alternative delivery models will also need to be reviewed to identify the ‘best fit’ for the new marina. This could include Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company or a new private sector led business.

In order to reduce project risks, obtain greater cost certainty and enable the project to proceed, the following work should also be undertaken:

geotechnical site investigations, to inform the design of dredging and construction works and enable further sediment contamination testing at depth, to determine the dredging disposal method.

develop the designs further to take account of ground conditions.

undertake Environmental Screening in order to determine if an Environmental Impact Assessment is required

employ a legal review of the Campbeltown Harbour Act to determine the necessary steps to identify if the proposed construction works are within the jurisdiction of the Harbours Act or whether a Harbour Revision Order is required.

A number of marine and planning consents and licenses are required to undertake the construction of the new marina. These are issued and managed by Marine Scotland and the Planning Authority, Argyll and Bute Council. Initial consultation with these authorities has identified that an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) may be required, but there are no significant objections to the proposals at this stage.

Since the proposed marina will be constructed on seabed belonging to the Crown, Crown Estate consent will also be required and an annual rent agreed.

Once full marine and planning consent has been obtained, the project could be progressed to detail design, contract tendering and construction.

Consultation with local stakeholder groups has shown that the proposals for a new marina are broadly supported. It is generally considered that development of the marina project will provide an improvement to the public realm in the harbour area and will lead to greater use and footfall, and therefore, opportunities for new business in the vicinity of the harbour.

Page 10: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 4\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Page 11: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 5\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

2 Introduction

2.1 Project Background

Argyll and Bute Council has agreed to an ambitious and forward-looking programme to assist regeneration and economic development in five of its waterfront towns – Campbeltown, Helensburgh, Oban, Rothesay and Dunoon. In November 2009, the Council unanimously agreed to allocate more than £30 million to the ‘CHORD’ programme. The multi-million pound initiative will see major improvements to the town centres and waterfronts of all five towns. One of the projects is the development of a new marina at Campbeltown.

There is currently an existing pontoon at Campbeltown that is used by resident and visiting recreational boats and yachts, which has capacity to berth approximately 34 boats. The pontoon is owned and operated by the Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company and is located on the northern side of Campbeltown Harbour, within Campbeltown Loch.

Figure 2.1 – Location Plan of Campbeltown Harbour

In 2008, consultants Scott Wilson undertook an options appraisal report [Ref. 6] for a new marina. The report recommended Option 4, which involves dredging and construction of new pontoons on both sides (north and south) of the Old Quay. This option has been taken forward for assessment in this study. Following this review, the study has evaluated revised option designs.

Page 12: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 6\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

2.2 Project Objectives of the Scheme

The objectives of this project set by the CHORD project board prior to commencing this study are to:

Increase the number of berths to 145.

Improve and extend the existing facilities to provide an attractive facility for recreational sailing.

Market a redeveloped marina to capture a greater share of the recreational sailing sector. At present the facility is envisaged as a ‘transit’ marina but the opportunity for development of a commercial marina has not been ruled out.

To put in place an agreed, robust and sustainable management organisation.

2.3 Study Brief

Hyder Consulting, in association with DTZ, were commissioned by Argyll and Bute Council to undertake a technical feasibility study of a new marina at Campbeltown.

The project brief included:

a review of existing information

an assessment of infrastructure requirements and construction issues

a review of the wave climate

an assessment of the marina layout in accordance with current design standards.

masterplanning of on shore facilities to support the marina.

a review of the initial marina business case.

The above assessment was to be undertaken with due consideration and review of the existing harbour operations and uses, the historic listed status of buildings in Campbeltown Harbour and other ongoing infrastructure and regeneration projects in Campbeltown.

The study has assessed the feasibility of providing the new marina in the locations recommended by the Scott Wilson options appraisal report [Ref.6].

The initial marina business case has been developed by DTZ.

The objective of this study is to allow the Council to proceed to detailed design and subsequent Full Business Case.

Page 13: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 7\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

2.4 Acknowledgements

In undertaking this study, Hyder and DTZ have consulted with and received information from a number of sources. In particular we would like to thank the following individuals for their time and assistance:

Stuart Green and Nicola Debnam – Argyll and Bute Council

Stephen Scally and David Martin – Campbeltown Harbour Master and Assistant

John Mactaggart, Willie MacDonald and Michael Taylor – Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company

Martin Gorringe – Argyll and Bute Council

Jim Bryson and Arthur McCulloch – Argyll and Bute Council

George Bradley – RNLI

Colin Craig – West Coast Motors

Brian Keating – Kintyre Development Company

Richard Johnston – Clyde Fishermans Association

Rachael Duncan – Marine Scotland

Joanne Casey – AECOM

Jeremy Cox and Billie Barr – Halcrow

Ross MacPhie - Scott Wilson

Campbeltown Loch Sailing Club members:

Alastair Cousin

Michael Foreman

David Lord

Robert Craig

Page 14: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 8\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

2.5 Other Projects within Campbeltown

The following infrastructure and regeneration projects are ongoing within Campbeltown:

2.5.1 Campbeltown Townscape Heritage Initiative

The Townscape Heritage Initiative (THI) is to provide improvement to the heritage and conservation sites of the town. The project focuses on the regeneration and conservation of local buildings and architecture, mostly in the town centre. This project is part of the CHORD programme.

2.5.2 Campbeltown Kinloch Road Regeneration

This project is to provide physical regeneration of the Kinloch Road area, including improvement of the public realm. The project involves a land transfer legal agreement between Argyll and Bute Council and ACHA in order to realign the road through Park Square. The Highways depot is being demolished and the land is being passed to ACHA. The garage area next to Park Square may be purchased by the Council and used in the interim as a car park.

2.5.3 Campbeltown Infrastructure Project

This project will provide infrastructure improvements within the Campbeltown area to enable the transfer of large indivisible loads (such as wind turbine tower sections) between a new factory developments at Machrihanish Airfield and the New Quay at Campbeltown Harbour for export. This improvement is proposed to provide the infrastructure required to facilitate the development of renewable energy industry in the area.

The project involves a package of road works and modifications to the New Quay at Campbeltown Harbour. These works include:

road works between Machrihanish and the town – including a new road through Park Sq;

dredging to deepen the New Quay berth

works to New Quay existing open deck, combi wall and slipway,

new revetment in north west corner of Campbeltown Harbour and new road alignment at Old Quay / Hall St junction,

new road realignment at the New Quay

Page 15: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 9\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

2.6 Existing Marina Facilities and Amenities

2.6.1 Berthing

The existing floating pontoon has been located in its existing location since the late 1980’s. The pontoon is secured in place by a chain and anchor system which allows the pontoon to move up and down with the tide. The surrounding seabed has been dredged to provide approximately 3m water depth at lowest astronomical tide (LAT).

The pontoon is approximately 100m long. This can accommodate approximately 16 yachts alongside (with no rafting), assuming an average boat length of 10m. This includes two dedicated commercial berths, plus 8 boats on either side of the main pontoon.

Figure 2.2 The Existing Pontoon

However, current demand during peak periods is often 30+ boats. The consequence is that rafting up is the norm. The limit of the marina when boats are rafted two deep alongside both sides of the pontoon is approximately 34 boats.

The two dedicated commercial berths are used by rigid inflatable boats (RIBs) operated by the Kintyre Express and Mull of Kintyre Seatours.

The pontoon is owned and managed by the Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company (CLBC), who employ an attendant to undertake day to day housekeeping – collecting berthing fees from the honesty box, restocking information leaflets, keeping the pontoon clean and tidy – and assisting visiting boats approaching or leaving the berth and with enquiries. This role is provided on a part-time basis throughout the summer season.

Visiting yachtsmen can also choose to pay their dues at the Visit Scotland Tourist Information Office that is located on the Old Quay. Visit Scotland levy a charge to CLBC for this service, but it facilitates collection of dues from visiting boats without the need for a full time marina manager role.

Page 16: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 10\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

2.6.2 Showers and Toilets

The following crew facilities are provided within walking distance of the pontoon:

Aqualibrium – dedicated showers and toilet facilities for sailors are provided in the new Aqualibrium building. There is one shower and one toilet for each sex, plus a washing machine for laundry.

There is currently a charge or £3 levied per person to use these facilities.

Although there is a dedicated external access to these facilities, it is not currently used and access is managed via the Aqualibrium front desk. As a result access is only available during Aqualibrium opening hours:

Mon & Wed 07.00 – 21.00

Tues & Thur 08.00 – 21.00

Sat & Sun 10.00 – 17.00

Public toilets – located in Balgram St, with access via a keypad access code for out of hours access. The standard of these toilets is poor. There is no charge to use these facilities.

2.6.3 Electricity and Water

There is provision of electricity and water supply for berthed vessels on the existing pontoon. Electricity is provided from 8 bollards, with four sockets per bollard. At present the spatial distribution of bollards is such that not all boats can access a power point during busy periods.

There are three water-points provided on the pontoon.

2.6.4 Fuel and Gas

Red diesel, petrol and replacement gas canisters can be purchased from D. McNair & Son, whose premises on the waterfront are a short distance from the current marina. They also sell diesel from the fuel berth on the Old Quay, provided by a hose to vessels moored alongside.

Page 17: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 11\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Figure 2.3 Existing Fuel Berth

2.6.5 Chandlery and Engineering Services

Local companies including CMC Ship Chandlers, L&A Marine, DM Fabrication (welding including stainless steel) and JIG Joinery, provide local chandlery and engineering services for the resident fishing fleet, leisure and commercial craft.

2.6.6 Restaurants, Cafes and Bars

Campbeltown offers a typical variety of eat in, take away and social venues. The majority of restaurants and bars are located on Longrow and Main Street, which is approximately 200m walk from the Old Quay. The general standard of the amenities is not high and therefore provides no significant draw to visiting yacht crews.

The proposed improvements of the marina and potential increase in trade may offer scope for local businesses to provide a service more appropriate to visiting crews.

Page 18: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 12\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Page 19: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 13\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

3 Review of Existing Information A large number of data and information sources have been used to inform this study. A full list of references is provided in Chapter 12.0 of this report. In addition, surveys of the harbour structures have been commissioned to support this study and future design development and construction works.

3.1 Historic Charts

The UK Hydrographic Office holds within its archives historic charts that have been surveyed and issued by the Admiralty. Historic Admiralty charts of Campbeltown Loch date back to 1840. These charts have been viewed and compared for this study to determine changes that have historically occurred in and around Campbeltown Harbour.

The figures in Appendix A show a selection of the historic Admiralty Chart extracts.

The charts show that Old and New Quays/Piers have existed in some form to create a harbour at Campbeltown since 1840. These quays have been modified and changed in width and form over time to their current arrangement, although their overall length has remained approximately the same.

Between 1848 and 1854 a new harbour wall was constructed between the Old Quay and New Quay. The highway and houses of Hall Street are now found alongside this wall.

In 1840 the inner harbour area dried at low water. Between 1854 and 1892 the harbour was deepened so that approximately one third of the harbour was flooded at low water. By 1943 the seabed levels had changed to create deeper water alongside the Old Quay. In 1983 the harbour entrance was dredged to 4.0m below Chart Datum (CD), which also provided deeper water alongside the seaward end of the New Quay. Since that time the dredged level has not been strictly maintained, however, the charts show that the seabed levels have not significantly changed.

In 1990 the seabed on the north side of the Old Quay was dredged to 3.0m below CD to accommodate the new yacht pontoon.

It is noted that seabed levels within Campbeltown Harbour and north of the Harbour have not historically been recorded significantly lower than the current seabed levels. There is also little evidence of significant erosion or accretion within the Loch and dredging has been minimal.

It is interesting to note that the Admiralty Charts do show that in the mid 19th century a large area of the Loch foreshore was reclaimed to create a new recreation ground, which is now Kinloch Park and the Esplanade.

Page 20: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 14\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

3.2 Geotechnical Investigations

Argyll and Bute Council and previous local authority, Strathcylde Regional Council have procured a number of intrusive site investigations within the Campbeltown Harbour. The aims of the investigations were to understand the ground make-up for a variety of projects proposed within the harbour, and to the development or improvement of the New and Old Quays.

The majority of the historic boreholes sites are located within the harbour or close to the Old and New Quay walls. No investigations have been identified further north of the Old Quay.

Nicholson Site Investigation (September 1974) Site investigative work was undertaken alongside the New Quay in 1974 by Nicholson Site Investigation. It is presumed the works were undertaken to provide the relevant data for the first inward extension of the New Quay.

Exploration Associates Ltd – 134100 Factual Report on Ground Investigations (Feb, 1995) 5 no. boreholes were undertaken adjacent to the north and south face of the Old Quay wall. The aim of the investigation was to provide ground conditions for the replacement of the existing sheet piled walls (later defined as Fuel Berth Phases 1 & 2 and Inner Wall Phases 1 & 2).

Norwest Holst Soil Engineering Ltd - F11707 Report on Ground Investigation at Campbeltown Harbour (Nov, 2000) Norwest Holst undertook 9 no. boreholes within the harbour area, north of the New Quay.

The purpose of the investigation is not defined, but it is understood that an extension to the New Quay was proposed for a fabrication area for the offshore wind turbine structures.

Fugro Engineering Services Ltd - NEA041006 Factual Report on Ground Investigation (Jan, 2005) 14 no. boreholes were undertaken within the harbour, north of the New Quay wall and around the Old Quay head.

Again, the purpose of the investigations is not defined, but it can be assumed to be an extension to the Norwest Holst investigation undertaken in November, 2000. It is likely that the boreholes located around the head of the Old Quay were to provide information for the replacement of the sheet piled walls of the Fish Quay.

Scott Wilson – S106508 Campbeltown New Quay Expansion – Consolidated Tender from Structural Soils Ltd (Jan, 2010). The report produced by Scott Wilson identifies the undertaking of 13 No. boreholes with the harbour. These investigations form part of the works to extend the New Quay.

Previous investigations have been mostly focussed in the harbour area. To determine the composition of the seabed in the areas proposed by the Scott Wilson Option 4, the Norwest Holst survey [Ref 7] has been reviewed. The boreholes undertaken for this site investigation were located on the north and south face of the Old Quay.

No borehole records have been identified further north of these boreholes alongside the Old Quay.

Page 21: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 15\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Figure 3.1 Norwest Holst Soil Engineering Ltd Borehole Location Plan

North of the Old Quay (Boreholes No. 5 & 6) The uppermost seabed stratum is a 1.0m to 2.0m layer of soft silty sediment. This underlain by a 1.3m thick layer of medium dense sand, which overlies a 0.6m thick soft gravelly clay strata consistent across both boreholes.

An inconsistent level of bedrock was identified, -10.9mCD to -13.8mCD.

The two boreholes penetrated the seabed lower than the proposed dredging level. If the strata is consistent north of the Old Quay, based on the observation made to date, dredging should be possible to the required maximum depth of -3.0mCD without encountering bedrock.

South of the Old Quay (Boreholes No. 3 & 4) The two boreholes reviewed identify a slight variation of strata formation. The common uppermost seabed stratum is a 0.1m to 0.8m layer of soft silty clay. At BH3 an underlying layer (0.3m thick) of loose silty sand and gravel is present, with a 6.9m formation made up of soft gravelly clay to a firm clay. BH4 identifies a 9.7m thick layer of stiff clay and coarse gravel directly underlying the slender seabed strata.

A consistent level of bedrock was identified, -12.29mCD to -12.58mCD.

BH 3 penetrated the seabed lower than the proposed dredging level. The strata show some consistency, therefore the proposed -3.0mCD reduced level will cut into the stiff clay and gravel. The characteristics of this stratum will dictate the method of dredging.

Page 22: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 16\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

3.3 Harbour Surveys

3.3.1 Harbour Wall and Revetment Surveys

Arch Henderson LLP - Campbeltown Harbour Old Quay Survey Report, Ref No. 05229 (Dec, 2005) A survey was undertaken in December 2005 to investigate the condition/ deterioration of the Old Quay walls. The walls were inspected visually above MLWS and by divers beneath. Thickness readings of the sheet piles were taken at regular intervals (vertically and horizontally).

Figure 3.2 Arch Henderson LLP – Survey Location Plan Showing Wall Designations

The report identified the Old Quay required remedial action to improve the condition of the sheet piles and prevent further corrosion damage. The report identified Walls A and L were in need of immediate reconstruction.

The remaining surveyed walls suffered from accelerated low water corrosion. As a result from the corrosion, holes and a reduction in the steel sheet pile thickness were identified.

Since this survey was undertaken, Wall L has been replaced with a concrete block revetment, and the timber suspended deck (Wall K) has been reconstructed with a new filled retaining wall of sheet piles, with new tie rods. The new tie rods extend horizontally across the full width of the Old Quay structure and are either connected to the sheet piled Wall A, or where the structural condition of this wall is not competent, a concrete anchor block has been constructed immediately behind Wall A. The reconstruction of the Wall K was designed by Arch Henderson in 2005 and works undertaken in 2006.

Page 23: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 17\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Although the survey was thorough, it does not include areas of key importance that relate directly to the proposed marina options. Therefore additional survey work was required on the revetment north of Old Quay and the harbour wall adjacent to Hall Street.

The following surveys have been commissioned to inform this project:

Hyder Consulting Ltd – Harbour Wall Condition Survey, Ref no. UA002297 (Oct, 2010) – see Appendix E As part of this study, Hyder undertook a visual inspection of the Old Quay structure, the revetments north of the Old Quay (Walls L, M & N) and the harbour wall adjacent to Hall Street (Wall O). In addition thickness readings were measured of the sheet piles that form the Old Quay. All inspections and thickness readings were taken above water level. The survey report compares its findings to the previous Arch Henderson LLP survey and provides solutions to remedy the walls existing condition.

Figure 3.3 Hyder – Harbour Wall Survey – Wall Descriptions and Chainages

The survey found that the structure is generally suffering from various degrees of accelerated low water corrosion. The wall condition was found to be dependent on the age, location and protection systems applied to the walls.

Walls A, F, G and H were found to be in worst condition. In all cases the steel sheet piles have suffered from accelerated corrosion, particularly in the low water region. The corrosion has lead to loss of steel thickness, holing and exposure of mass fill within the structure. Significant repair works or replacement is recommended to ensure the integrity of the quay structure at these locations.

Page 24: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 18\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Walls C, D & E are also suffering from corrosion, particularly in the low water and splash zones. The more recently constructed (c.2000) Walls B & J have suffered less corrosion, and an application of paint has provided some additional protection to Wall B. However, a reapplication of protection system should be applied to impede further deterioration.

Wall K was generally found to be in good condition and protected with applied paint and cathodic protection (sacrificial anodes) systems.

The revetment directly north of the Old Quay (Wall L) is a newly constructed concrete block revetment which is good condition and no remedial work is required.

The revetments further north (Walls M and N) are generally constructed of close fitting masonry blocks laid on a slope, from the beach level to the road above. The age of these structures are not known, although the original reclamation was constructed c.1850. The revetment structures were found generally in fair condition but in some places masonry blocks are missing and the revetment has been locally eroded. Localised repairs are recommended to ensure the integrity of these structures.

The Hall Street harbour wall (Wall O) is generally in good condition. Sections of pointing have been removed by erosion. It is recommended that minor patch repairs are required to the harbour wall.

Caldive – Campbeltown Marina – Dive Survey and Seabed Sampling, Ref no. CAL/715/10 (Oct, 2010) – see Appendix F A dive survey of the Old Quay was undertaken in order to identify the condition of the quay walls below low water level. Caldive were contracted and undertook the dive survey in October, 2010. The survey used the same wall reference names and chainage markers as the Hyder survey.

The dive survey reported widespread accelerated corrosion, from low water level down to the bed. Holing was identified to Walls A, G and H. Significant loss of the steel sheet pile wall thickness was found on Walls A, C, F, G, H and J.

Caldive reported Walls B and K to be in good condition below water, with the protective paint system mainly intact. Ultrasonic thickness readings on Wall B and K identified dissimilar pan and web thicknesses to their design values.

The Hyder, Caldive and Arch Henderson surveys have all identified similar areas of concern, although the condition of the harbour walls appears to have worsened since the Arch Henderson survey in 2005, and in particular Walls A and H.

3.3.2 Sampling Survey

In addition to a dive survey, Caldive were commissioned to undertake sampling of the seabed sediments. Samples were collected by using a Van Veen Grab deployed from a small workboat and were taken from within the harbour and north of the existing pontoon, as shown in Figure 3.4. The sediment samples were transferred to containers supplied by the testing laboratory, Exova, and transferred to the labs by cooler boxes packed with ice.

Page 25: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 19\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Figure 3.4 Caldive - Marina Survey and Sample Locations

The sediment sampling and testing was undertaken in accordance with the Marine Scotland, Draft Guidance for the Sampling and Analysis of Sediment and Dredged Material to be Submitted in Support of Applications For Sea Disposal of Dredged Material [Ref.4].

The results of the sediment testing are presented in Appendix D. The results have been compared with the list of Action Levels provided by Marine Scotland (also shown in Appendix D) and are summarised in Table 3.1.

Location On-site Observations Results Summary

N1Sandy brown layer 2-3mm thick overlying narrow black band <1mm thick.

Several PAHs found to exceed AL1

N2Soft, black harbour mud. Sulphurous smell.

Several metals found to exceed AL1 but less than AL2

N3Soft, black harbour mud. Sulphurous smell.

Several metals found to exceed AL1 but less than AL2

N4Soft, black harbour mud. Sulphurous smell.

Several metals and PAHs found to exceed AL1 but less than AL2

S12 grabs each for samples B and C, multiple grabs for sample A.

All results below AL1

S2Light brown silty sandy layer 2-3mm over black harbour mud with sulphurous smell.

Several metals found to exceed AL1 but less than AL2

S3Soft, black harbour mud. Sulphurous smell.

Several metals and PAHs found to exceed AL1 but less than AL2

Table 3.1 Sediment Sampling and Testing Summary Results

The results show that contaminants were found in surface sediments at almost all locations. In all cases the contamination concentrations were found to be less than Action Level 2 (except

Page 26: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 20\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

PAHs for which an AL2 is not defined). Marine Scotland have been consulted on the results of the sediment testing and their response is discussed in Section 10.3.1 of this report.

Whilst undertaking the dive survey Caldive observed extensive amounts of steel debris, and significant amount of dead catch on the bed. Notably, the piles on Wall J have been damaged by the bed debris and future dredging and disposal operations may be impeded by the debris.

If dredging exceeds 1m depth then sediment core samples will be required to identify the depth of the contaminated sediments.

3.3.3 Topographical & Bathymetric Survey

Topographic and bathymetric surveys have been carried out by Aspect Land & Hydrographic Surveys. The topographical survey of the harbour structures, land areas surrounding the harbour, including the intertidal foreshore, was carried out in September 2010. The topographic survey was required to tie-in with the bathymetric survey (August 2006) of Campbeltown Loch and Harbour.

The topographic and bathymetric surveys have been used in this study for the numerical wave modelling, technical review of dredging works and stability of harbour structures, and for the marina layout planning and on-shore master planning.

Page 27: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 21\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

4 Technical Review of Marina Proposals This chapter provides a technical review of the marina proposal (Option 4) recommended by the Scott Wilson report; Argyll & Bute Council – Campbeltown Options Appraisal [Ref 6], as shown in Figure 4.1.

The following Chapters 5, 6 also review the operational issues and demand for a marina of this size and layout.

Figure 4.1 Scott Wilson Option 4 Marina Proposal

The Scott Wilson proposal includes 66no. 10m long berths in the harbour and 79no. 10m long berths north of the Old Quay. A new floating breakwater is proposed to extend from the northeast corner of the Old Quay to provide wave protection to the marina berths north of the Old Quay.

Page 28: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 22\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

4.1 Marina Layout

For the purpose of the technical, operational and business case assessment, the marina layouts proposed by Scott Wilson have been modified in accordance with current best practice in marina design.

Figure 4.2 Revised Marina Layout

The modified marina layout (as shown in Figure 4.2) includes the following changes:

Rafting of moored vessels has been eliminated and replaced with individual finger pontoons for each berth. As discussed in detail in the DTZ Campbeltown Marina Business Plan (Appendix L) individual berths are preferred by sailors as vessels stand greater risk of damage when rafted together. It is also inconvenient for the inner vessel attempting to leave the marina and there is a loss of privacy for inner berthed vessel.

Broaden the fairways between pontoons to allow sufficient room for safe navigation to the berths.

Vessels have been orientated so that they face towards the prevailing wind and wave direction. This reduces the roll and heave of vessels at berth and therefore reduces the risk of damage to vessels and the discomfort onboard.

By making these changes to the berthing arrangement the overall number of berths has been maintained (145no.) but the footprint of the marina has increased. This increase in footprint will require greater quantity of dredging both within the harbour and north of the Old Quay. [Note that review of market demand and recommendations of sustainable numbers of berths are made in Chapters 6 & 7 of this report.]

In the area north of the Old Quay, the extended dredge area will conflict with the existing Scottish Water emergency outfall buried pipeline. As a result if a marina of this size is required, then the outfall pipeline would have to be rerouted, as shown in Figure 4.2.

Page 29: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 23\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

4.2 Wave Climate

Detailed numerical modelling has been undertaken of the wave climate in Campbeltown Loch for this study. In particular the modelling has focussed on the wave climate in the region of Campbeltown Harbour. A report describing the modelling inputs, method and results is provided in Appendix C.

The proposed marina will be exposed to a wide range of wind and wave conditions and water levels during its lifetime. In order to investigate the overall feasibility of the proposed locations for the pontoons, two representative environmental conditions were considered, as detailed in Table 4.1, with reference to the YHA Code of Practice (2007) [Ref 1] which defines acceptable design conditions for a new marina. Waves can and do occur at all stages of the tide, however, model applications were considered for the highest appropriate water level as this can support the largest waves, thereby providing a conservative assessment of feasibility.

Environmental Condition

Description Wind/Wave Condition

Water Level Marina Design Wave Conditions

Normal

Operating Condition (NOC)

The conservative worst case wind

and wave climate which can be expected to be experienced by the marina during normal operations year round

1 in 5 year

return period values

Mean High

Water Springs (MHWS)

Hs < 0.3m

Tp < 2.0sec

Design Condition

The worst case storm conditions

which may be experienced by the marina during its design lifetime

1 in 50 year

return period values

1 in 1 year

extreme water level

Hs < 0.4m

Tp < 2.5sec

Table 4.1 Model Applications

Figure 4.3 Revised Marina Layout Predicted Distribution of Significant Wave Height under Normal Operating Conditions (left) and Design Conditions (right)

The results show the sheltering effect of the Old Quay, with wave heights in the vicinity of the existing pontoon being reduced relative to the incident waves by up to 70%, as with the NOC results. The predicted wave heights are compliant with the design standard (maximum wave heights are shown in Table 4.1) in parts of this area. However, wave heights exceed 0.4 m for

Page 30: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 24\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

much of the present marina location. Reflection from the Old and New Quay result in an area of positive interference offshore of the harbour entrance, as with the NOC results.

4.3 Dredging Works

Dredging will be required to provide sufficient water depth for boats to navigate safely in to the marina at all states of the tide. The dredged or natural depth should be at least 0.5m more than the draught of craft using the harbour [Ref. 1]. Yachts up to 15m length will typically not exceed 2.5m draft. Therefore it is recommended that the seabed be dredged to at least -3.0m CD to provide safe water depth within the marina.

A review of bathymetry and topographic survey data shows that dredging will be required to accommodate new marina proposals both within the harbour and north of the Old Quay. Table 2 shows the estimated dredging quantities for both areas, based on the latest bathymetry and topographic data.

Marina Location Dredge Quantity

In Campbeltown Harbour 27,200m3

North of the Old Quay 32,300m3

Table 4.2 Estimated Dredging Quantities As the review of the historic charts in Chapter 3.1 has shown, there is no evidence that the harbour has previously been dredged below current levels. Therefore the stability of harbour walls may be put at risk if additional dredging is undertaken without protecting these structures.

In order to determine the seabed properties, the geotechnical site investigation data has been reviewed (see Chapter 3.2). On the basis of this data and the restricted access to the site it is anticipated that the seabed will be dredged by a long reach excavator from a barge.

In order to assess whether the seabed material is acceptable for sea disposal, sediment samples have been taken from the dredging locations both within the harbour and north of the Old Quay. The test results (see Appendix D) show that some of the samples contained heavy metals and polyaromatic hydrocarbons exceeding the Action Level 1 values issued by Marine Scotland. No results were found to exceed Action Level 2.

Initial consultation with Marine Scotland suggests that, based on the surface sediment samples undertaken for this study, are of relatively little concern regarding contamination. However, more extensive sampling at depth is recommended in order to determine a more conclusive response from Marine Scotland.

If Marine Scotland determines that the dredged material can be disposed at a licensed disposal site at sea. The closest sea disposal site to Campbeltown is MA060 – Campbeltown which is centred at 55° 26.84’N 005° 31.65’W. The dredged material will be transported by spilt hopper barges to the disposal site (approximately 5.5Km sailing distance from Campbeltown Harbour).

If Marine Scotland determine that sea disposal is not acceptable then the dredged material will be taken to a specialist land disposal site. An initial waste categorisation analysis (using the CATWASTE application) shows that preliminary classification of the materials is Non-Hazardous. However, the sediment samples tested recorded high Organic Matter concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 9.6% although not directly comparable to Total Organic Carbon (TOC), the possibility remains that the TOC for the sediment samples could exceed the Non-Hazardous Criteria of 5%. Further testing and consultation with the Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) would be required in order to confirm its suitability for land disposal.

Page 31: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 25\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

The nearest Non-Hazardous disposal site to Campbeltown is at Lochgilphead (50miles by road from Campbeltown Harbour). Alternatively it may be possible to remediate the material for safe use or disposal. The cost of both of these methods will be significantly higher than sea disposal.

4.4 Stability of Harbour Structures

From the results of the conditional surveys reviewed in Chapter 3.3 of this report, it has been identified that some harbour structures are in poor condition. New marina facilities constructed on or close to these structures may be at risk if their condition is not improved. Therefore, in order to ensure the safety of marina users and long term viability of the marina the following structures have been assessed:

Hall Street Harbour Wall (Wall O) – new marina facilities constructed within the harbour will require dredging of the harbour. Without protection, these works are likely to reduce the stability of the harbour wall and may undermine the toe of the wall. Therefore it is recommended that the toe of this wall would need to be protected by construction of a new sheet pile low level retaining wall, or with a stabilised dredged slope.

Old Quay (Wall A) – new marina facilities constructed within the harbour will rely on the integrity of this sheet pile wall, which is currently found to be in poor condition. Also dredging works required to deepen the harbour will reduce the stability of the harbour wall. This wall would need to be replaced with a new sheet pile retaining wall.

Old Quay (Walls B, C and D) – a new marina in the harbour is not likely to impact on the stability of these walls due to their distance from the proposed marina.

Old Quay (Walls J and K) – a new marina north of the Old Quay is not likely to impact on the stability of these walls due to their condition and the sufficient existing water depth adjacent to these walls, will not require additional dredging.

Kinloch Road Revetment (Wall L) – a new marina north of the Old Quay is not likely to impact on the stability of this revetment due to its condition and the existing water depth does not necessitate additional dredging adjacent to the revetment.

Revetment (Walls M & N) – a new marina north of the Old Quay will require dredging close to the toe of this revetment. Without protection, these works may undermine the toe and reduce the stability of the revetment.

Scottish Water Emergency Outfall – a new marina north of the Old Quay of the size shown in Figure 4.2 will conflict with the buried pipeline and outfall. It will be therefore be necessary to re-route the pipeline in order to accommodate the proposed marina.

Page 32: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 26\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Page 33: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 27\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

5 Operational Review of Marina Proposals

5.1 Existing Harbour Activities

Campbeltown Harbour is a traditional small harbour on the west coast of Scotland. The New Quay and Old Quay harbour provides safe berths and quays for a diverse range of commercial and recreational craft. The activities within the harbour and marina can be divided into the following categories:

Timber – Timber is exported from the New Quay. The timber is stored on the New Quay and loaded onto vessels up to 65m length. There are noise restrictions imposed on these operations outside daylight hours.

Renewable Energy Industry – Skykon, formerly Welcon and Vestas, specialise in the fabrication of wind turbine towers at a manufacturing facility in Machrihanish. Vessels berth at the Roll-on Roll-off (Ro-Ro) ferry terminal on the south side of the New Quay to deliver steel sheets used for the fabrication of the turbine towers. Fabricated towers are exported from the berth on the north side of the New Quay. ~145m vessels export the turbines.

There are also currently imports of wind turbines and tower sections for a new wind farm development on the Kintyre Peninsular. These components are unloaded from vessels on the north side of the New Quay.

General Cargo – The Ro-Ro terminal on the south side of the New Quay was used by the Campbeltown to Ballycastle ferry until operations ceased in 1999. The terminal is now used infrequently for general cargo imports and exports.

Fishing – Campbeltown Harbour has been used as a home port and visitor port by the fishing industry for many centuries. Although the fishing fleet has declined in number, the harbour is still used daily by a fleet of up to 30 fishing vessels to unload fish stocks. The vessels unload catch alongside the Fish Quay at the head of the Old Quay. Fishing vessels also frequently berth up to two deep on the Old Quay inside the harbour and against the Fuel Berth.

Fishing boats using the harbour frequently arrive at last light and leave the harbour before dawn.

There is a building on the Fish Quay that is used for the storage of landed fish, ice making machine and other fishing equipment.

Tourism - Three commercial RIBS have permanent or reserved berths at the landward end of the pontoon. The Kintyre Express, Mull of Kintyre and newly formed Isle of Sanda provide links for tourists who travel from other destinations such as Lochranza, Ayrshire and Northern Island.

Campbeltown Harbour is also visited by the Waverley and Balmoral. These historic passenger ships operate during the summer season and berth on the east face of the Old Quay head (the Fish Quay).

Visitors - Campbeltown Marina accommodates transit and destination visitors, Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company (CLBC) allocate approximately 20 berths for visitor boats during the summer season. The number of visitor boats fully utilises any remaining berthing space on the pontoon. Rafting is the only available method to accommodate the visiting vessels on the pontoon.

Page 34: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 28\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Leisure - Campletown Sailing Club (CSC) currently has a membership of approximately 20-23. There are no dedicated berths on the pontoon for the sailing club, although some members do pay for “occasional use” of the pontoon.

Residents CLBC manages the pontoon sited north of the Old Quay. At present, the business comprises of approximately 8 vessels, either shallow draft or ribs. Although there are approximately 10 resident boats during the summer season, this figure is managed by CLBC to control available berthing space on the pontoon.

RNLI – The RNLI has a boat house with crew facilities on the Old Quay. Adjacent to this, on the north side of the Old Quay, there is a fixed berthing pontoon for an RNLI Severn Class offshore rescue boat, which is permanently berthed at this location. There is also an inshore rescue boat housed within the boat house, which is launched from the slipway within the harbour adjacent to the New Quay.

5.2 Vessel Movements

Estimate vessel movement figures have been obtained from information supplied by Campbeltown Harbour Master (HM), Campbeltown RNLI and Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company (CLBC).

Activity Movements Period

Timber (Import & Export) 10 Month

Wind Towers (Import & Export) 5 to 8 Month

Fishing 80 Month

RNLI Annum Table 5.1 Commercial and Trade Vessel Movements

Commercial and trade vessel movements provided by the HM are based on an average of records taken over the last 3 years. Additionally, the figures provided by Campbeltown RNLI identify an approximate number of launches during 2009.

CLBC have provided figures for VBNs (number of Visitor Boat Nights). The figures produced identify a steady decline in VBNs from 2007 to 2010 (1800 to 1300 VBNs). DTZ’s business plan report assumes that 75% of visits to Campbeltown Marina are transit vessels and around 25% are destination based.

It can be assumed the number of destination vessels will increase if the marina and facilities are improved, and therefore the transit/destination ratio will become more balanced.

Page 35: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 29\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

5.3 New Marina Impacts on Harbour Operations

The revised marina layout (as shown in Figure 4.2) will have the following implications on harbour operations:

Within the Harbour - The extent of the proposed marina pontoons and berths are likely to impede use of the Old Quay within the harbour, which is frequently used for berthing fishing vessels up to two deep within the harbour.

Fishing vessels leaving the harbour at early hours in the morning are likely to create some noise and therefore nuisance to marina users.

It will be necessary to restrict movements of small craft (marina users) whilst commercial vessels are entering or leaving the harbour. This practice is common in other ports and therefore sailors are normally prepared to accept some inconvenience with this regard. Since currently the commercial craft movements are infrequent, this is unlikely to have significant impact on marina users in the short term. However, if vessel movements increase then restrictions may be become more frequent.

The proposed location of the marina in the harbour will not impact on access to the New Quay by commercial vessels.

North of the Old Quay - The extent of the proposed marina pontoons and berths north of the Old Quay will not impede use of the Old Quay. However, the location of the floating breakwater will impede use of the Fish Quay and Fuel Berth. In particular, large vessels (such as the Waverley) that berth against the Fish Quay will be restricted from springing off the berth. Fishing vessels leaving the Old Quay at early hours in the morning are likely to create some noise and therefore nuisance to marina users.

The use of the Harbour and New Quay will not be affected by the proposed marina pontoons and berths north of the Old Quay.

Page 36: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 30\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Page 37: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 31\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

6 Marina Business Review To confirm the viability of the marina, DTZ have produced an initial business case (see Appendix L) to ensure the proposed marina meets the future market demand, customer requirements, is financially viable and produces a viable long term solution.

6.1 Market Review

An assessment has been made of the number of berths required at the new marina by analysing the main market segments currently at Campbeltown marina;

Resident boats – Those who pay for a season berth (May to October and/or November to April).

Occasional berthing – Local based boats. Regular users, occasional users and concessionary users.

Visitor boats – Which are not based at Campbeltown Loch.

Resident Boats – there are currently 10 resident berth holders on the pontoon. This number is managed by CLBC, to ensure sufficient space is available on the pontoon for visiting boats. In the winter season the number of resident boats moored alongside reduces to 5 to 6 boats.

The resident boats are predominantly motor boats. The majority of the Campbeltown Sailing Club (CSC) members use the Sailing Club’s own moorings within the loch. The majority of the Sailing Club member’s yachts are lifted out for annual maintenance and cleaning, and then stored on land over the winter season. Very few sailing club members berth alongside the pontoon.

The pontoon currently provides two berths for commercial ribs that operate from Campbeltown Harbour. The number of RIBs permanently berthed in Campbeltown is understood to be increasing to three imminently.

If a larger marina is developed on dedicated berths, it is foreseen the marina will receive a small increase in resident berths, which may include residents in the Kintyre catchment and a few sailing club members attracted by the improved facilities and sheltered berthing provided within the marina. There is not anticipated to be any significant change in the demand for commercial berths at the marina.

Occasional Berthing – The CLBC currently allow occasional berthing for RIBs and other recreational craft are launched on the slipway in the harbour, and members of the CSC to load with supplies or occasionally berth overnight. The demand for this use is not expected to increase.

Visitor Boats – The majority of vessels using the existing pontoon are visiting. Approximately 75% of which are in transit and the remaining 25% are destination based.

Data on Visitor Boat Nights (VBNs) provided by CLBC, show no discernable trend increase between 2003 and 2007, and then a small decline between 2007 and 2010. There are a number of possible reasons for this decline, which are discussed in more detail in Appendix L.

Page 38: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 32\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

6.2 Demand Projection

Demand projections calculated by DTZ for VBNs and associated proposed berthing space for future scenarios are shown in Table 6.1. A best estimate assumption of a 2.5% annual compound growth rate is projected for a new marina at Campbeltown. Pessimistic and optimistic scenarios have also been assessed to enable sensitivity modelling.

No. of VBNs

No. of Berths

No. of VBNs

No. of Berths

No. of VBNs

No. of Berths

2011 1300 22 1300 22 1300 22

2012 1600 28 1600 28 1600 28

2013 1600 28 1640 28 1680 29

2014 1600 28 1681 29 1764 30

2015 1600 28 1723 30 1852 32

2016 1600 28 1766 30 1945 33

2017 1600 28 1810 31 2042 35

2018 1600 28 1856 32 2144 37

2019 1600 28 1902 33 2251 39

2020 1600 28 1949 34 2364 41

Pessimistic Scenario - 0% compound growth

rate p.a.

Best EstimateScenario - 2.5% p.a. compound

growth rate

Optimistic Scenario - 5% p.a. compound

growth rate

Table 6.1 Projected Growth in Visitor Boat Nights and Visitor Berth Numbers

In order to meet periods of peak demand over the period 2011 – 2020, a total of 57 berths are required, which represents an increase of 22 additional berths.

2010 2020 Increase

Resident Boats - Commercial (Ribs/Shallow Draft) 3 3 0

Resident Boats - Occasional (Ribs/Shallow Draft) 0 3 3

Resident Boats - Leisure (Motor Boast & Yachts) 10 17 7

Visitor Boats (Yachts) 22 34 12

Total 35 57 22

No. of BerthsMarket Segments

Table 6.2 Calculation of Required Marina Size (Best Estimate Scenario)

The 57 berths specified are to accommodate the maximum demand in 2020. However, it is recommended that the marina initially provides up to 45 berths, based on mean berth numbers during peak season, with potential to expand to 57 berths to meet the foreseen peak demand in 2020.

The berths should be sized for 10m, 12m and 15m vessels, to meet existing sailing market requirements. In order to minimise the dredging within the marina, the shallow draft vessel (commercial and leisure RIBs) should be sited close to the land entrance of the marina.

Page 39: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 33\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

6.3 Market Requirements

In order to provide an attractive and accommodating marina to visiting and permanent yachts and motorboats, provisions of the following marina facilities are recommended:

Marina office and receptionist, for paying dues, bookings, enquiries, general information and on-site support.

Modern shower, toilet and laundry facilities, that are clean and close to the marina, with 24hr access. The minimum numbers of facilities required for new marinas are shown in Table 6.3.

Electricity and water supply on the pontoons

Waste disposal (chemical toilet and solid waste), that regularly emptied, cleaned and close to the marina.

Sale of fuel, gas and chandlery close to the marina and open all days of the week.

Engineering services are not essential but useful for permanent berth holders and emergency repairs to visiting boats.

Security provision suitable for the location (e.g. CCTV and restricted access to pontoons, berths and marina facilities.

Wifi broadband internet connection.

Male Female

Toilets 1 per 50 berths 1 per 50 berths

Urinal 1 per 75 berths

Wash Basin 1 per 50 berths 1 per 75 berths

Showers 1 per 75 berths 1 per 75 berths

Washing Machine 1 per 300 berths

Drying Machine 1 per 300 berths

Deep Basin 1 per 300 berths

Table 6.3 Marina Facilities Numbers [Ref 1]

All facilities should have facilities for disabled people, in accordance with the Equality Act 2010. [From 1 October 2010, the Equality Act replaced most of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA).]

It is also recognised that the regeneration of the waterfront area and the upgrading of the restaurant facilities would enhance Campbeltown’s attractiveness as a destination for yachts cruising in the Clyde Estuary. This would support both the commercial viability of the new marina and boost the local economy through increased tourism expenditure.

Page 40: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 34\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Page 41: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 35\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

7 Discussion of Marina Proposals From the business review undertaken for this study, it is evident that the proposed 145 berth marina capacity far exceeds projected demand. Therefore construction of a marina of this size is not recommended.

Best estimate projections suggest a maximum demand in 2020 for 57 berths. This value is far lower than the 145 berths recommended by the previous Campbeltown Options Appraisal report [Ref 6] and the project objectives. The Scott Wilson Options Appraisal report does not provide justification for the provision of 145 berths. Therefore, it is recommended that the proposed marina size be reduced to 57 berths.

Such a reduction in marina capacity will only require development of one marina site at Campbeltown Harbour. The principal options for marina location are either within the Harbour or north of the Old Quay. In both locations the overall size of the marina will be reduced from that shown in Figure 4.2, since fewer berths will be required.

The study has shown that the wave climate within the harbour is less protected than the area north of the Old Quay. However, development of a marina in either location will require the construction of additional wave protection, in the form of a breakwater structure.

The construction of the marina in the harbour will require works to protect the toe of the Hall Street harbour wall (Wall O) and replace Old Quay harbour wall (Wall A), due to the additional dredging required to accommodate yachts in the marina. The marina in the harbour will also impede use of the Old Quay by fishing boats and occasional restrictions will be applied to vessels enter or leaving the marina due to movements of commercial vessels entering or leaving the New Quay.

Construction of the marina north of the Old Quay will require extensive dredging works. However, the extent of these works and dredging volume will be reduced significantly since the marina capacity in this area will be reduced from 79no to 57no. This reduction in dredge area will also avoid the Scottish Water outfall, and therefore negate any works to re-route the buried pipeline.

The location north of the Old Quay will provide a separate marina area, away from the activity and noise of other harbour activities. However, the construction of a breakwater directly adjacent to the Fish Quay, may impede use of the head of the Old Quay.

Based on this assessment the area north of the Old Quay is promoted as the preferred location, but options to reposition or replace the breakwater should be considered.

Page 42: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 36\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Page 43: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 37\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

8 Marina Proposal Design Development The findings of the previous chapters have been taken forward to develop proposals for a new marina design. New marina layout options are assessed in Chapter 8.1. The financial business viability for the developed Option 2B and the on-shore masterplan is then assessed.

8.1 Marina Layout Options

Two new marina layout options were developed with a reduced marina capacity of 57 berths in accordance with projected demand for 2020, as shown in Figures 8.1 and 8.3 below. A further Option 2B is a development of Option 2A, as shown in Figure 8.5. [Larger copies of these drawings are presented in Appendices G & H.]

8.1.1 Option 1A

Figure 8.1 Revised Marina Layout Option 1A

Option 1A utilises the existing pontoon, in its current position, with three additional pontoon lengths extending north. All berths are accessed by individual finger pontoons.

The berths are arranged for a range of vessel sizes, with up to 10m length boats on the first pontoon, 12m length boats on the second and 15m length on the third. The continuous berth on the south side of the main pontoon enables a flexible berthing arrangement, accommodating a range of vessel sizes as required.

This arrangement enables the dredge depth to be designed to suit the draft of boats (-2.5mCD area and -3.0mCD area, as shown), and thereby minimising the dredging quantity. The estimated dredging quantity is 13,250m3.

Page 44: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 38\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

The navigation entrance to the main area of pontoons is located on the north side of the marina. The entrance channel and northern extent of the dredged area will be marked by lights and painted piles to aid navigation.

The entrance at the north of the marina provides a separation between recreational craft using the marina and commercial/fishing vessels using the Old Quay. This arrangement will not impact the movement of the RNLI Severn Class lifeboat or the day fishing boats that currently use the Old Quay. However, a floating breakwater attached to the north east corner of the Old Quay does restrict use of the Fish Quay, particularly for large vessels that ‘spring off’ the corner of the quay.

Pedestrian access to the marina has been changed from its current entrance on Kinloch Road to a new entrance directly onto the Old Quay. This provides better access to the marina facilities and office located on the ground floor of the Harbour Master’s office building.

The floating breakwater attached to the north east corner of the Old Quay provides some protection to marina from waves. Figure 8.2 shows the predicted significant wave height distribution for the proposed Option 1A under normal operating conditions (1 in 5yr return period event) and under design conditions (1 in 50yr return period event).

Under normal operating conditions the predicted wave heights in the marina area and the entrance channel are compliant with the NOC acceptability criteria of a maximum wave height of 0.3 m [Ref 1].

Under a 1 in 50 yr return event a significant part of the marina area, between the floating breakwater and the middle pontoon, shows predicted wave heights which are in excess of the maximum 0.4 m wave height specified for design conditions [Ref.1]. Although it is unlikely that the entrance channel will be used in these conditions, there are a number of berths within the marina that fall below the specified design standard.

Figure 8.2 Option 1A Predicted Distribution of Significant Wave Height under Normal Operating Conditions (left) and Design Conditions (right)

Page 45: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 39\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

8.1.2 Option 2A

Figure 8.3 Revised Marina Layout Option 2A

The pontoon layout for Option 2A provides a spine pontoon at the north side of the marina with three additional pontoon lengths and all marina berths to the south. Again all berths are accessed by individual finger pontoons.

The berths are arranged for a range of vessel sizes, with up to 10m length boats on the first pontoon, 12m length boats on the second and 15m length on the third. For this option the third pontoon is also a floating breakwater, which is wider and more robust than normal marina pontoons.

As for option 1A, this arrangement enables the dredge depth to be designed to suit the draft of boats (-2.5mCD area and -3.0mCD area, as shown), and thereby minimising the dredging quantity. This estimated dredging quantity for this option is 12,700m3.

The entrance to the marina, will be marked by lights to aid navigation. It is located on the south side of the marina, which requires recreational craft entering the marina to sail alongside the commercial/fishing vessels and the RNLI lifeboat berthed against the Old Quay. However, sufficient space has been allowed in the layout for vessels to pass safely and for the RNLI life boat to access her berth safely.

Pedestrian access to the marina has been changed from its current entrance on Kinloch Road to a new entrance directly onto the Old Quay. This provides better access to the marina facilities and office located on the ground floor of the Harbour Master’s office building.

Since this option does not require a breakwater attached to the Old Quay, there is no restriction on vessels using the Fish Quay and Fuel Berth.

Page 46: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 40\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Figure 8.4 shows the predicted significant wave height distribution for the proposed Option 1A under normal operating conditions (1 in 5yr return period event) and under design conditions (1 in 50yr return period event).

Figure 8.4 Option 2A Predicted Distribution of Significant Wave Height under Normal Operating Conditions (left) and Design Conditions (right)

Wave heights within the marina area are predicted to be compliant with the NOC acceptability criteria of a maximum wave height of 0.3 m. However, as for Option 1A, a significant portion of the marina area is shown to have predicted wave heights in excess of the design standard of 0.4 m for extreme (1 in 50 yr return period) events [Ref 1].

Page 47: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 41\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

8.1.3 Developed Option 2B

Options 1A and 2A are comparable in many ways. Of the two options, Option 2A provides the least disruption to existing harbour operations, because the breakwater is detached from the Old Quay. However, neither option meets the required wave climate required by design standards [Ref 1] under extreme wave conditions.

Both Options 1A and 2A provide sufficient berth capacity to accommodate 57 vessels. However, the demand projections show that this requirement will not be realised until year 2020. For this reason the Business Plan (presented in Chapter 6) recommends that the marina be designed to initially accommodate 45 berths, with sufficient space to expand capacity at a later date to meet the foreseen 2020 berth requirement of 57 berths.

These issues have been considered in the development of the recommended Option 2B (see Figure 8.5). This option also incorporates improvements that were identified at the Technical Workshop, as discussed in section 10.2 of this report.

Figure 8.5 Revised Marina Layout Option 2B

Based on the same footprint area as Option 2A, this option initially provides 45 berths (shown by solid lines on Figure 8.5), with space to expand to 57 berths at a later date (shown by solid lines on Figure 8.5). The initial construction includes dredging the whole marina basin and installing all pontoon piles. The only works required to increase the marina capacity will be to procure and install additional pontoons (shown dashed in Figure 8.5). The guide piles for the future pontoon extension will initially be used to mark the edge of the dredged area, as an aid to navigation.

As an alternative to providing finger pontoons on the future pontoon extension, it may be preferable to provide just an open pontoon alongside the wavescreen, to allow flexible berthing and room for exceptional craft (such as sailing training yachts) to use the marina.

Page 48: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 42\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

The hammerhead on the end of the middle pontoon may also be kept clear for use by exceptional craft and/or boats towed inshore by the RNLI.

As for option 2A, this arrangement enables the dredge depth to be designed to suit the draft of boats (-2.5mCD area and -3.0mCD area, as shown), and thereby minimising the dredging quantity. This estimated dredging quantity for this option is 12,700m3.

The revised Option 2B includes a piled wavescreen (see Figure 8.6) rather than a floating breakwater. This structure is designed to reflect more wave energy and thereby provide greater shelter from waves. Since the breakwater is not attached to the Old Quay, there is no restriction on vessels using the Fish Quay and Fuel Berth.

Figure 8.6 Piled Wavescreen

The piled wavescreen acts to prevent the long period design waves from enter the marina. Figure 8.7 shows the predicted significant wave height distribution for the proposed Option 2B under design conditions (1 in 50yr return period event).

The predicted wave heights throughout the marina area are compliant with the defined acceptability criteria of 0.4 m for the design condition. There is a small area of reflection from the existing marina revetment which results in slightly elevated wave heights between the two pontoons.

The wavescreen causes reflection of waves, which does increase the wave climate on the seaward side of the screen, and wave heights in the approach channel, between the pontoons and the Old Quay are in excess of 0.4 m. However, it is not expected that vessels will be entering or leaving the marina during the extreme wave events.

Page 49: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 43\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Pedestrian access to the marina has been changed from its current entrance on Kinloch Road to a new entrance directly onto the Old Quay. This provides better access to the marina facilities and office located on the ground floor of the Harbour Master’s office building.

Figure 8.7 Option 2B Predicted Distribution of Significant Wave Height under Design Conditions

Page 50: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 44\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

8.2 On Shore Masterplan

A masterplan for the on-shore facilities has been developed for the marina, as shown in Appendix J. The masterplan has been developed with consideration to the local streetscape, listed structures, harbour operations and modern marina requirements.

8.2.1 Marina Facilities

Marina facilities will be provided on-shore facilities expected by sailors in modern marinas and at least the minimum specified by the Yacht Harbour Association. The facilities will also be compliant with the requirements of the Equality Act 2010. [From 1 October 2010, the Equality Act replaced most of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA).]

The marina will provide the following facilities:

Marina office and receptionist, for paying dues, bookings, enquiries, general information and on-site support

Modern shower, toilet and laundry facilities, with 24hr access, as shown in Table 8.1.

Waste disposal, for chemical toilet and solid waste

Male Female

Toilets 2 2

Urinal 1

Wash Basin 2 2

Showers 2 2

Washing Machine 1

Drying Machine 1

Deep Basin 1

Table 8.1 Proposed Marina Facilities

Following consultation with local sailors at the Technical Workshop (see section 10.2) it is proposed to provide at least two showers per sex, rather than the YHA recommended one, to match the high demand for showers by visiting sailors. Greater flexibility may be achieved by providing four unisex shower cubicles.

It is proposed that the new marina office, showers, toilets, laundry and chemical toilet disposal facilities will be provided on the ground floor of the Harbour Master’s office. A space of approximately 80m2 will be required, to be leased from Argyll & Bute Council. The building will be fitted with fixtures expected of modern marinas, which are anticipated to require refurbishment every 5 years. A new entrance to the building will be built on the north side of the building to provide a dedicated entrance to the marina facilities.

If the marina is to be constructed in a phased approach (as proposed for Option 2B), whilst the number of berths is less than 50, it may be feasible for the existing yachtsmen’s facilities that are provided in the Aqualibrium to be utilised. Changes will be required to enable access to the facilities 24hrs a day. This will require a key pad or swipe card system and CCTV to be installed at the entrance to the facility, on the south side of the building. This option would save costs in the short term for development of the marina.

Page 51: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 45\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

It has been identified during this study that the existing buildings on the Old Quay are at risk of flooding during extreme tidal events. A flood risk assessment will be required to support the planning application for the development and use of these facilities, to take into account predicted sea level rise and increase storminess. It may be necessary to incorporate flood mitigation measures to prevent flood damage and ensure the safety of people using these facilities.

On the Old Quay, it is proposed that the area in front of the new marina facilities be redeveloped. The area will be resurfaced and an integrated area for use by pedestrians and vehicles, where priority will be given to pedestrians. The mostly pedestrian area will be furnished with new seating, lighting and planters, providing a safe and attractive environment with an outlook over the marina. Examples of street furniture are provided on the On-shore Masterplan (see Appendix J).

Security for the new marina will include the provision of CCTV coverage over the marina pontoons and entry gate, that will monitored and controlled from the marina office. A pin code or swipe card entry system will provide access to the pontoons, berths and marina facilities.

Currently the following facilities are provided by local businesses.

Sale of fuel, gas and chandlery close to the marina and open all days of the week.

Engineering services are not essential but useful for permanent berth holders and emergency repairs to visiting boats.

It is expected that these facilities will remain and increase in supply as the marina expands.

8.2.2 Local Amenities

Campbeltown offers a variety of restaurants, public houses, bars, hotels and fast-food take away venues. The majority of restaurants and bars are located on Longrow and Main Street, which is approximately 200m walk from the Old Quay. There is also a cinema located adjacent to the harbour on Hall Street.

8.2.3 Development Opportunities

The development of a new marina brings with it opportunity for investment in other local business. A predicted increase in visiting and permanent boat numbers will bring greater numbers of visitors to Campbeltown. Also with proposed improvements to the public realm on the Old Quay and Kinloch Road (proposed as part of the Kinloch Road Regeneration project), greater use of the harbourside area is foreseen. This increase in footfall is likely to provide an increase in trade in Campbeltown and in particular the harbour area. This will offer opportunity for local businesses to provide new shops, restaurants, and bars, along Hall Street with views overlooking the harbour.

The Kintyre Development Company also has proposals to develop the Royal Hotel, with £2m of funding committed (£1.1m by HIE) and the residual funding requirement of £5m coming from debt/equity finance. The Company propose to provide good quality bar and restaurant facilities. In its prominent location in Kinloch Road directly opposite the proposed marina, the redeveloped Royal Hotel will provide a natural draw to yachtsmen.

Page 52: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 46\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

8.3 Dredging and Construction Works

The marina will be constructed using both floating and land based plant.

There are approximately 12,700m3 of sediments to be dredged to provide sufficient water depth in the new marina. It is anticipated that the dredging works will be undertaken by a long reach excavator from a spud-leg barge. Depending on the licensing conditions set out by Marine Scotland and SEPA, the disposal of dredging will either be to a licensed sea disposal site, to land fill or, alternatively, local reuse of material, facilitated by using soil remediation methods.

If the dredged sediments are allowed to be disposed at sea they will be transferred to a split hopper barge and towed to the licensed sea disposal site, approximately 5.5km from Campbeltown Harbour. If the dredged material is to be taken to land fill and is designated Non-Hazardous material, it will be carried 50miles by road to a landfill site at Lochgilphead. This is anticipated to generate approximately 1000 lorry journeys.

Initial consultation with Marine Scotland suggests that, based on the surface sediment samples undertaken for this study, there is relatively little concern regarding contamination. However, more extensive sampling at depth is recommended in order to determine a more conclusive response from Marine Scotland.

The pontoon guide piles and breakwater piles will be driven into the seabed from a spud-leg barge or jack-up rig. The piles will be pre-painted and then paint re-applied if any paint is lost during piling. Each guide pile will be capped with white polyethylene caps.

All works to the quayside surfacing and street furniture, and marina facilities building will be undertaken by conventional civil engineering and building methods. CCTV and gate entry systems will be installed by a specialist M&E contractor.

Due to the remote location of site and long travel distance by road it is likely that the larger construction materials, such as piles and pontoons will be delivered by sea and lifted from ship to a dedicated construction compound on the quayside for storage during construction.

It is recommended that use of local skilled and non-skilled labour, and local materials is actively encouraged in the construction contract.

8.4 Maintenance Works

Anecdotal evidence from the Harbour Master and CLBC suggests that siltation in the area north of the Old Quay is currently very low. This is supported by the review historic Admiralty Charts which shows very little change in seabed levels. It is reported that there has been no dredging undertaken in that area to maintain water depths in the last 20 years. Therefore it is anticipated that the future maintenance dredging requirements will be minimal.

The marina pontoons and piles will have a 20 – 25yr life if regularly inspected and maintained. The pontoons, electricity and water services will require bi-annual inspections and the gaskets and bolted connections between pontoons tightened regularly.

It is anticipated that the marina facilities (showers, toilet and laundry) will require refurbishment every 5 years, to ensure that a good standard is maintained.

Page 53: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 47\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

8.5 Construction Cost Estimates

A budget estimate of construction and maiantenence costs for the new marina has been prepared by Gardiner & Theobald, who are experienced in marine construction works.

The budget cost estimates for the construction of Option 2B are presented in Table 8.2. These cost estimates have been used in the business plan presented in Chapter 8.6 of this report.

Item Description Cost Estimate £

1 Dredging Works 259,150

2 Pontoons 918,985

3 Hard Landscaping 62,700

4 Soft Landscaping 1,000

5 External Lighting 12,000

6 Buildings 135,750

7 Infrastructures 85,000

8 Contractor Preliminaries (12.5%) & OHP (7.5%) 308,000

9 Professional Fees (15%) 267,000

10 Optimism Bias (30%) 614,875

Total Project Costs excl VAT 2,664,460

Table 8.2 Recommend Option 2B Budget Cost Estimates

The estimated budget cost for future installation of additional pontoons to increase the berth capacity from 45 berths to 57 berths (at today’s rates and without inflation) is shown in Table 8.3.

Item Item Cost Estimate £

2 Additional Pontoons 38,650

8 Contractor Preliminaries (12.5%) & OHP (7.5%) 8,092

9 Design Fees (15%) 7,011

10 Optimism Bias (30%) 16,126

Total Project Costs excl VAT 69,879

Table 8.3 Additional Marina Pontoon Budget Cost Estimates A full breakdown of the budget cost estimates for Option 1A, 2A and 2B is provided in Appendix K. The cost estimates are based on the concept design drawings and a number of assumptions stated in the cost estimate report.

The cost estimates provided here are based on the assumption that the dredged material is suitable for removal by excavator and that all dredged material will be disposed at sea, at the Campbeltown disposal site.

In accordance with HM Treasury guidance, an ‘optimism bias’ has been added to the capital cost estimates. This factor reflects the fact that unforeseen costs and necessary changes to

Page 54: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 48\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

project can increase project costs as the project is developed and constructed. In this case a percentage figure of 30% has been applied which is commonly used at this stage of projects. It is recommended that if the scheme is progressed then a more detailed risk assessment be undertaken and a risk valuation is calculated using the Monte Carlo or similar approach.

In order to reduce project risks and obtain greater cost certainty the designs must be developed further, geotechnical site investigations undertaken to inform the design. Consultation should be undertaken with Marine Scotland and SEPA in order to determine an acceptable disposal route.

Page 55: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 49\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

8.6 Initial Business Case

DTZ have produced an initial business case (see Appendix L). A financial model has been prepared to review the commercial feasibility of the proposed development (Option 2B). This is based on an assessment of the following financial parameters for the recommended marina development:

Capital costs

Income projections

Operating costs

The capital costs are based on the budget cost estimates provided by Gardiner & Theoblad.

The income projections and operating costs are in part based on the current figures provided by CLBC, but have been updated to account for future increased rates, projected demand and any additional expenditure. The income projections are made on the following assumptions:

Increased berthing charges – the following rates will apply from the date of the marina opening:

Permanent summer berths – from £60/m to £100/m (6 months)

Permanent winter berths – from £30/m to £50/m (6 months)

Frequent berthing – from £23/m to £30/m (1 month in summer)

Occasional berthing – from £100 to £125 (per annum)

Concessionary berthing – from £50 to £75 (April to October)

Visitor boat berthing – from £1.80/m to £2.10/m (per night)

Number of Resident Boats – for our ‘best estimate’ the number of resident boats increase as follows:

Summer residents – from 13 to 20 boats

Winter residents – from 12 to 24 boats

The summary income projections for the first 20 years of the marina’s operation are presented in Table 8.4. A detailed breakdown of income by income category for each of the income scenarios is presented in the DTZ report in Appendix L.

Page 56: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 50\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Year Income Scenarios (£'s)

Pessimistic Best Estimate Optimistic

1 55,390 62,590 69,790

2 55,390 63,355 71,319

3 55,390 64,138 72,925

4 55,390 64,942 74,611

5 55,390 65,765 76,381

6 55,390 66,609 78,240

7 55,390 67,474 80,192

8 55,390 68,361 82,241

9 55,390 69,270 84,393

10 55,390 70,201 86,652

11 55,390 71,156 89,025

12 55,390 72,135 91,516

13 55,390 73,138 94,131

14 55,390 74,167 96,878

15 55,390 75,221 99,761

16 55,390 76,301 102,789

17 55,390 77,409 105,968

18 55,390 78,544 109,306

19 55,390 79,707 112,811

20 55,390 80,900 116,492

Source: DTZ projections

Table 8.4 New Marina Income Projections The financial appraisal has been conducted under the following assumptions:

Time horizon – a 20 year operational lifespan as being suitable for a marina project of this nature. This has been confirmed by the cost consultants who estimate the lifespan of the pontoons and piles to be 25 years and other elements 20 years.

Year 0 – allowed up to 12 months for the construction and installation period. Operational costs and revenues are then calculated from years 1 – 20.

Discounting – all capital costs, operating costs and income over the 20 year period have been discounted to give a Net Present Value (NPV) to compare the different options and sensitivity tests. The Government’s 3.5% Test Discount Rate has been used.

Inflation – all costs and income are in ‘constant costs’ so no allowance has been made for inflation. Again this is appropriate given that we are discounting and all figures are given in present day values.

VAT – this has not been included in the financial appraisal for capital costs.

Depreciation – a straight-line depreciation over 25 years has been assumed for the hardware elements of the capital costs (pontoons, piles and hard landscaping, etc.)

Page 57: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 51\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Residual value – there would be a residual value for the capital equipment at year 20 equivalent to 20% (i.e. 20 years out of 25 year lifespan).

Optimism bias – capital costs have been increased by 30% to allow for ‘optimism bias’.

Sensitivity Testing – we have modelled Option 2B under three scenarios – pessimistic, best estimate and optimistic scenarios: see Table 8.5.

Sensitivity Assumptions Pessimistic Best Estimate (BE) Optimistic

Capital costs – no change Same as BE As per G&T budget cost estimates

Same as BE

Operating cost contingency 10% increase 5% increase 0% increase

Resident boat income – long stay 25% < BE Flat line yrs 1 - 20 25% > BE

VBN income – CAGR p.a. 0% 2.5% 5%

Source: DTZ assumptions

Table 8.5 Assumptions Underpinning Scenarios An initial business plan report, including the financial model for the three Option 2B scenarios are presented in is presented in Appendix L.

Table 8.6 shows the summary NPV results for a range of scenarios.

Funding Assumptions Pessimistic Scenario

Best Estimate Scenario

Optimistic Scenario

Full funding – capital and depreciation included

-3,310,537 -3,087,571 -2,833,338

Partial funding 1 – capital excluded

-646,077 -423,110 -168,877

Partial funding 2 – capital & depreciation excluded

-181,049 41,914 296,150

Source: DTZ

Table 8.6 NPV Summary at Year 2020 in £’s The results shows that for best estimate scenario, funding sources will be required to fund capital costs. In fact it is only when capital costs and depreciation are excluded from the model that the marina business will break even.

From the NPV analysis shown in Table 8.6, the following observations are made:

Capital costs are not fundable – it is not possible for the new marina to be self financing. The financial model demonstrates that neither the capital costs nor an allowance for depreciation are fundable. Even in the most optimistic scenario there is an NPV of -£169k when capital costs are excluded and depreciation included.

There is no commercial rationale for investment in this project on strictly commercial grounds. Therefore, the only recourse is to public sector funding and /or philanthropic fund raising. The latter is highly unlikely on its own. Therefore the project would not proceed without a public sector funding commitment.

Page 58: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 52\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Operating profit is possible – the ‘best estimate’ scenario indicates a positive NPV of £42k if capital costs and depreciation charges are excluded. This is good news if the required capital funding can be secured, in that the projected revenues will more than offset operational expenditure over the lifetime of the marina. Furthermore, given the planned maintenance programme that has been budgeted, there should be a residual value for the marina of at least £200k, which is over and above the NPV of £42k.

But there are risks – the NPV analysis shows that the level of profitability is marginal for the best estimate scenario with discounted profit only averaging around £2k per annum. Furthermore, the pessimistic scenario would result in a cumulative loss of c. £180k.

Page 59: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 53\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

9 Implementation

9.1 Licenses and Consents

The following statutory legislation generally applies to marine construction works in nearshore and harbour locations, such as the proposed marina at Campbeltown.

9.1.1 Marine (Scotland) Act 2010

The licensing and licensing enforcement provisions in the Marine (Scotland) Act 2010 combine existing regulatory regimes from the Food and Environment Protection Act 1985 and the Coast Protection Act 1949.

Marine Scotland is the directorate of the Scottish Government charged with the integrated management of Scotland's seas. On April 1, 2010 a wide range of licensing and licensing enforcement functions were taken over by the Marine Scotland Licensing Operations Team (MS-LOT), which is based at the Marine Laboratory in Aberdeen. MS-LOT is now responsible as a one-stop licensing portal for a variety of marine licences.

The activities provided by MS-LOT are:

managing applications and inquiries;

determining and granting licences;

undertaking inspections to ensure compliance with licences and licence conditions;

varying, revoking, suspending and transferring licences;

issuing stop and emergency safety notices;

identifying and carrying out or ordering remediation works as necessary;

issuing compliance and remediation notices;

issuing (and reviewing issue of) notices of intent/monetary penalties; and

maintaining a register of licensing activities.

The following paragraphs 1.1.2 and 1.1.3 consider licensing and consenting requirements under the Food and Environment Protection Act and the Coast Protection Act. However, depending on the timing of the marina works, it may be that the consent required will be a licence under the Marine (Scotland) Act 2010, which will replace both these regimes. MS-LOT will continue to regulate this new regime. Current official estimates for the regime coming into force are early 2011, however given that the consultation on the new licensing regime has only recently closed, a more realistic timescales would be summer to autumn 2011.

Page 60: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 54\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

9.1.2 Food and Environment Protection Act 1985 (known as ‘FEPA’)

Scottish Ministers have a statutory duty to control the deposit of articles or materials in the sea / tidal waters; the primary objectives being to protect the marine ecosystem and human health, and minimise interference and nuisance to others.

This duty is exercised under powers conferred by the Food and Environment Protection Act 1985 Part II (FEPA), which requires that a licence be obtained from the licensing authority to deposit any articles or substances in the sea or under the seabed.

9.1.3 The Coast Protection Act 1949 (known as ‘CPA’)

Under Section 34 of the Coast Protection Act 1949 the consent of Marine Scotland is required for the following operations:

the construction, alteration or improvement of any works on, under or over any part of the seashore lying below the level of mean high water springs;

the deposit of any object or materials below the level of mean high water springs;

the removal of any object or materials from the seashore below the level of mean low water springs (e.g. dredging);

where obstruction or danger to navigation is caused or is likely to result.

It is the applicant's own responsibility to satisfy himself that he has power to undertake the tidal works concerned and that any other necessary consents are obtained before work is commenced. The issue of a Section 34 consent does no more than indicate that the extent of the works may represent an obstruction or danger to navigation and they may be undertaken in accordance with the conditions laid down in the Scottish Ministers' consent to minimise that obstruction or danger.

Section 36 of the Act sets out the powers of the Marine Scotland to enforce the provisions of section 34 and to take certain remedial actions.

A consent under the CPA Part II is normally valid for a period of three years. However, so that applicants may elect to make a joint application for works that also require a FEPA licence, the duration of a consent may be amended so as to bring the expiry dates of both consents (where issued) into alignment.

Exemptions to the Act include certain works that have been authorised under an order under the Harbours Act 1964, under local Acts or by Order under the Transport & Works Act. To the extent that the marina works will be covered by a harbour revision order, then, CPA consent will not be necessary.

9.1.4 The Water Environment (Controlled Activities) (Scotland) Regulations 2005

In 2003, the introduction of European environmental legislation called the Water Framework Directive (WFD) resulted in the Water Environment and Water Services (Scotland) Act 2003 (WEWS Act) becoming law in Scotland. The WEWS Act gave Scottish ministers powers to introduce regulatory controls over water activities, in order to protect, improve and promote sustainable use of Scotland’s water environment.

Page 61: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 55\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

The Water Environment (Controlled Activities) (Scotland) Regulations 2005 regulations, which are more commonly known as the Controlled Activity Regulations (CAR), are regulated by SEPA. The CARs apply to any discharges, disposal to land, abstractions, impoundments and engineering works which may affect Scotland’s water environment, including lochs and coastal waters.

9.1.5 Existing Private Harbours Legislation and the Harbours Act 1964

The principal piece of legislation to consult in relation to the development works within Campbeltown Harbour is the Harbour Act of 1846, which relates specifically to the Harbour, Quays and Wharfs of Campbeltown. Depending on its terms, the terms of the Harbours, Docks and Pier Clause Act 1847, the Harbours, Piers and Ferries (Scotland) Act 1937, the Harbours Act 1964 and the Docks and Harbours Act 1966 may be relevant.

From an initial review of the Campbeltown Harbour Act, 1846, it is not apparent whether the Harbour Authority has authority to construct new pontoon berths north of the harbour walls. It may be that the Harbour Authority is required to submit a Harbour Revision Order for the marina works for approval by Scottish Ministers. However, no evidence has been found of a Harbour Revision Order for the CLBC pontoon.

It is recommended that a legal review of the Campbeltown Harbour Act be employed to determine the necessary steps to comply with the current legislation.

9.1.6 Town and Country Planning

All forms of land development are deemed to require the benefit of planning permission unless permitted development rights dictate otherwise. Statutory planning control under the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1997 and associated legislation extends to the mean low water mark of ordinary spring tides (LWMOST) and to marine fish farming out to three nautical miles.

Since the proposed development will include some works above LWMOST, including the pontoons, linkspan and bankseat and improvements to the Old Quay public realm, it is likely that planning permission will be required. However there are permitted development rights applying to harbour developments, depending on the extent of the land covered by the Campbeltown Harbour Act, 1846. The Act should be checked to assess whether these might apply here.

It is recommended that the planning authority, Argyll and Bute Council, be consulted to confirm if planning permission is required.

No structures or buildings that are listed under the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997, will be affected by the proposed works to construct the new marina. Therefore listed building consent is a not requirement for this project.

If the developer is not the Council, it may also be necessary for it to enter into a planning agreement under s.75 of the Town and Country Planning (Scotland) Act 1997, to secure matters that cannot be legitimately contained within a planning condition e.g. funding roads improvements connected with the development.

Page 62: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 56\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

9.1.7 Environmental Legislation

Applications for marine consents and planning permission under the legislation described above may trigger the requirement for a formal Environmental Impact Assessment and similarly, where the project is within, adjacent to or otherwise is likely to have a significant effect on a designated conservation site, a Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA) under the Conservation (Natural Habitats) Regulations 1994 (commonly known as the ‘Habitats Regulations’).

The Marine Works (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations 2007 is the principal piece of legislation imposing the requirement for EIA for certain projects requiring FEPA and/or CPA consent. The Environmental Impact Assessment Directive (97/11/EC) requires an EIA to be carried out in support of an application for development consent for categories of project listed in the Directive at Annexes I and II. As an Annex II project, the project may require an EIA if the appropriate authority (in this case Marine Scotland) consider it is required due to the project size, location or nature on the environment.

The onshore proposals may also require an EIA under Town and Country Planning (Environmental Impact Assessment) Regulations 1999, subject to confirmation by the Local Planning Authority. In this case it would be normal for one EIA to be prepared to cover both marine and terrestrial environs.

As part of the FEPA licence application there is a requirement to provide the licensing authority with such information as it deems necessary to enable it to properly consider the application. This requirement may be met by information contained within an EIA.

Once the preferred option has been identified and agreed, a screening opinion would be sought from the planning authority, Argyll and Bute Council and Marine Scotland regarding the need for an EIA. If it is determined that EIA is required, through effective scoping it should be possible to limit the environmental topics considered within the Environmental Statement. A Habitats Regulations Assessment (HRA) screening exercise will be needed to determine if the preferred option is likely to have a significant effect on any protected sites. Depending upon the outcome of the Screening Report and liaison with SNH it may be necessary to prepare a Statement to Inform an Appropriate Assessment.

Where the various consents impose a requirement for an EIA, the consenting authorities will normally be content for the developer to provide a single document, provided that its scope is sufficient to embrace the range of environmental issues which each authority would need to consider. This may, for example, take the form of separate volumes addressing particular topics.

9.1.8 Crown Estate

The Crown Estate manages the land and seabed owned by the Crown (generally the foreshore and the seabed under tidal waters). It understood that the seabed north of the Old Quay at Campbeltown is owned by the Crown.

If new developments are to be constructed on Crown land/seabed then a licence or lease will be required from the Crown Estate. It is likely that an annual rent will be charged for use of the seabed.

Previously the CLBC have paid an annual rent to Crown Estate of £770, which is a fixed annual charge based on seabed area. It is anticipated that this charge will increase for the proposed new marina, which has a larger footprint area.

Page 63: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 57\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

9.1.9 Scottish Water

Consent will be required from Scottish Water for connection of a new waste water pipe from the marina facilities to the existing sewer in Kinloch Road.

9.2 Construction Programme

Prior to works starting on site the following work will need to be complete:

Confirmation of Funding and Procurement Strategy

Geotechnical Site Investigations

Detailed Design

Planning and Marine Consents

Environmental Impact Assessment (if deemed necessary)

It is estimated that the construction works will take approximately 6 – 9 months to complete.

In order to minimise disruption to visiting boats and other harbour operations, it is recommended that the marina construction works take place out of the peak visitor season. During the construction the existing pontoon and any permanent bertholders should be moved alongside the north side of the Old Quay.

9.3 Funding

Since the financial model demonstrates that neither the capital costs nor an allowance for depreciation are fundable. It is recommended sources of public sector funding and /or philanthropic fund raising be reviewed.

If the capital cost of £2.66m can be secured, then the project moves into a ‘green light’ zone. If not, then lower capital cost solutions will need to be developed modelling different marina designs/sizes.

9.4 Procurement, Operations and Management

Alternative delivery models will need to be reviewed to identify the ‘best fit’ for the new marina. Options may include:

1. Grant Funded, Council Owned and Operated by the Harbour Master

2. Grant Funded, Privately Leased and Operated

3. Privately Funded, Owned and Operated (site leased by Council)

Private investors will need to be investigated. Only then will the project be ready to move to the development phase of detailed planning, procurement and installation.

Page 64: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 58\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Page 65: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 59\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

10 Consultation

10.1 Local Stakeholder Consultation

Throughout the study local stakeholder groups and individuals have been consulted and informed of the project.

During the initial data gathering phase of the project the following stakeholders were consulted:

Argyll and Bute Council

Campbeltown Harbour Master

Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company

Campbeltown Loch Sailing Club

RNLI

West Coast Motors

Kintyre Development Company

Clyde Fishermans Association

Marine Scotland

The following consultants were also consulted regarding previous and ongoing projects in Campbeltown.

AECOM

Halcrow

Scott Wilson

In addition, the Campbeltown Harbour Master was consulted throughout the project on the findings of the assessment and the proposed marina layouts. This consultation helped inform the assessment of the marina options, particularly with regard to harbour operations.

10.2 Technical Workshop

Presentation of technical feasibility study findings and marina layout options were presented at a technical workshop for stakeholders. This was then followed by a question and answer session. The questions, answers and comments made are recorded in Appendix M. Copies of the preferred option and on-shore masterplan were distributed to attendees. The attendees were also welcomed to take feedback forms and reply with considered response to the proposals.

A copy of the Technical Workshop presentation and feedback forms was also published on the Argyll and Bute Council website.

Feedback from stakeholders on marina proposals shows widespread support for the marina proposals. A summary of the responses is shown in Table 10.1.

Page 66: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 60\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Proposal

Str

on

gly

Dis

app

rove

Dis

app

rove

Neu

tral

Su

pp

ort

Str

on

gly

Su

pp

ort

Location of the Proposed Marina 4 8

Number and Arrangement of Pontoon Berths 1 2 5 4

Scope of the Proposed Marina Facilities: 1 8 3

Marina Office

Toilets, Showers & Laundry 2 1 4 5

Waste Disposal 2 5 5

Electricity and Water 1 6 5

Security - CCTV and Restricted Entry System 6 5

Location of Proposed Marina Facilities 1 1 4 6

Improvements to the Old Quay Public Realm 2 4 6

Connection to the Town Centre and Other Amenities 4 8

The Marina Project as a Whole 2 10

Table 10.1 Summary of Stakeholder Feedback from the Technical Workshop

The specific comments and suggestions that have been provided on the stakeholder feedback forms have been considered. In particular issues that have raised disapproval on the feedback forms have been addressed. As a result the following issues have been addressed and are shown on the final drawings of the proposed marina layout (Option 2B) and On-shore Masterplan:

• The number of showers have been increased from the numbers recommended by the YHA guidance [Ref.1], to two for both males and females (total four showers), to allow for the higher percentage of visitor berths.

• A longer berth will be provided on the hammerhead of the middle pontoon to enable RNLI rescue vessels, ocean youth vessels, etc to berth in the marina.

• Dedicated car parking facilities will not be provided. The small number of car parking spaces required by permanent berth holders can be accommodated in the existing on-street car parking and car parking on the Old Quay.

Other comments and suggestions that were raised will be considered in the following stages of the project, if investigations are undertaken to reduce the project capital cost. These comments include:

• If marina berth numbers are less than 50, utilise the existing sailor facilities at the Aqualibrium, by improving access and security to enable 24hr access to sailors only.

Page 67: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 61\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

• Pontoon based toilet and shower facilities.

• Provide flexible berthing arrangement (i.e. no finger pontoons) alongside the third pontoon to accommodate larger yachts and motorboats (15m plus).

10.3 Licensing and Approval Initial Comment

The licensing and approval authorities were consulted in order to inform them of the proposals and to receive their initial comment on the marina proposals shown in Figure 8.5. A summary of their responses are provided below and copies of their responses are shown in Appendix N.

10.3.1 Marine Scotland – Licensing Operations Team

MS-LOT has identified that the marina development will be regarded as an Annex II project under the Marine Works (Environment Impact Assessment) Regulations 2007, and therefore an EIA may be required, although this has not been confirmed by MS-LOT so far.

It is confirmed that a FEPA license and CPA consent will be required and that separate licenses will be required for the construction and dredging works.

MS-LOT has reviewed the sediment grab sample testing results that were undertaken for this study and has stated that there is “relatively little contamination concerns”, which would indicate that sea disposal might be acceptable. However, MS-LOT recommend that cores be taken to provide a more extensive temporal view of the sediment deposits. Cores are usually required when the contamination history of an area is unknown and the depth of dredging exceeds 1m of fine sediment, which will apply to this project.

10.3.2 Local Planning Authority

Argyll and Bute Council are the relevant Planning Authority, from whom approval for all development above mean low water will be sought.

The proposal is broadly supported by the following planning documents, subject to compatibility with existing harbour uses and users, and appropriate design and infrastructure with regard to the character of the area:

• Argyll and Bute Local Plan 2009 through an Area for Action (AFA 14/1)

• Local Planning Policy (LP TRAN 8)

Other planning policies that may apply include:

LP TOUR 1 – for new/improved tourist facilities

LP TRAN 6 – for parking standards

LP TRAN 4 – for access to the public highway

LP TRAN 3 – for special needs access provision

LP ENV 14 – impacts on Campbeltown Conservation Area

Page 68: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 62\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Since the proposed development is located within Campbeltown Conservation Area, a detailed design statement would be required in order to demonstrate that the development would not have an adverse impact upon either the character or appearance of the designated area.

10.3.3 Scottish Environment Protection Agency

The consultation response from Scottish Environment Protection Agency (SEPA) referred to the jurisdiction of Marine Scotland in this case.

In relation to the foul drainage form the marina facilities, SEPA’s preference is for a connection to the public sewer.

No other comments were given.

10.3.4 The Crown Estate

The Crown Estate forwarded the enquiry to their agents, Bidwells, who manage this area of the coastline on their behalf.

Bidwells confirmed that the Crown Estate is the owner of the seabed at this location but is not the owner of the adjacent foreshore. They requested that discussions be held with Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company, to determine their support to the proposals.

The Crown Estate supports applications of this nature where it can. Assuming that there are no difficulties that cannot be overcome the Crown Estate would look to enter into a lease agreement. Frequently rents for commercial purposes such as marinas are charged on a turnover basis and would include a base charge.

There would be a charge for any dredging that is required which will depend on the quantity of material that is removed and the use to which the material is used, whether used beneficially or dumped.

Page 69: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 63\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

11 Conclusions A technical, operational and commercial market assessment has been made of the proposals for a new marina at Campbeltown (based on the Option 4 proposal recommended by the Campbeltown Options Appraisal report prepared by Scott Wilson). Initially some changes were made to the marina layout in order to comply with current best practice in marina design.

However, market assessment has projected insufficient demand to fill a 145 berth marina. The best estimate of demand for 2020 requires 57 berths.

The reduced size marina will require less land take than originally proposed. Therefore there are two potential locations for the new marina; one in the harbour, the second north of the Old Quay.

The wave modelling assessment found the wave climate within the harbour to be less sheltered than north of the Old Quay. However for both marina locations additional protection would be required, by a breakwater or similar structure.

The technical review found that dredging would be required in both locations. The sediment sampling and testing found that some contaminants are present in the sediments in both areas. However these are between Action Level 1 and Action Level 2. Marine Scotland have advised that the samples raise relatively little contamination concerns. However, they recommend that more extensive core samples be taken to determine whether sea disposal is appropriate for the dredged sediments.

Dredging and construction of a new marina within the harbour would require construction of toe protection works to the Hall Street harbour wall (Wall O) and replacement of the Old Quay harbour wall (Wall A).

The operational review found that the proposed marina in the harbour would impede use of the Old Quay. This quay is currently used for berthing fishing vessels up to two deep alongside the quay.

Although the original marina proposal north of the Old Quay conflicted with the Scottish Water buried pipeline and outfall, the revised number of berths would require less seabed area and therefore not extend as far as the buried pipeline.

In consideration, the area north of the Old Quay is, therefore, considered to be the preferred location for the new marina.

Two marina layout options (1A and 2A) were prepared to assess the best pontoon arrangement. During consultation with the Harbour Master it was identified that the location of the floating breakwater in Option 1A would restrict the use of the Fish Quay and Fuel Berth. Therefore for operational reasons Option 2A was preferred.

These layouts were also tested in the numerical wave model, which should that under normal operating conditions (1 in 5 yr return period event) the required wave climate would be provided. However under an extreme event (1 in 50yr return period) the wave conditions would not meet the design standard.

As a result of this assessment, a further option (2B) was developed. This option utilises a piled wavescreen to provide the required wave climate in the marina to suit current design standards. This option also has reduced berth capacity of 45 berths to meet current berth demand, but with room to be extended in the future to accommodate the projected 57 total number of berths in

Page 70: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 64\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

2020. This option also incorporates improvements that were identified during the Technical Workshop.

The proposals include the provision of marina facilities, including an office, showers, toilets and laundry facilities, and improved public realm on the Old Quay. However, this area is at risk of tidal flooding and therefore mitigation measures may be required.

On operational and technical grounds, Option 2B is recommended as the preferred option. The budget cost estimate for the construction for this option is £2,664,460 including 30% ‘optimism bias’ and excluding VAT.

For longer term capacity planning, the design of Option 2B has in-built flexibility to accommodate a cost-effective extension to the marina. With an estimated capital cost of only £70k, an additional 12 berths can be provided increasing capacity from 45 to 57 berths.

The cost estimates are based on the assumption that the dredged material is suitable for exaction by excavator and that all dredged material will be disposed at sea, at the Campbeltown disposal site.

If the scheme is progressed a number of marine and planning consents and licenses are required to undertake the construction of the new marina. These are issued and managed by Marine Scotland and the Planning Authority, Argyll and Bute Council. Initial consultation with these authorities has identified that an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) may be required, but there are no significant objections to the proposals at this stage.

Since the proposed marina will be constructed on seabed belonging to the Crown, Crown Estate consent will also be required and an annual rent will be charged.

As part of the initial business assessment, a financial business model has been prepared for the new marina. The model shows that it is not possible for the new marina to be self financing. The financial model demonstrates that neither the capital costs nor an allowance for depreciation are fundable. Even in the most optimistic scenario there is an NPV of -£169k when capital costs are excluded and depreciation included. There is no commercial rationale for investment in this project on strictly commercial grounds.

If capital costs and depreciation charges are excluded the ‘best estimate’ scenario indicates a positive NPV of £42k. The level of profitability is marginal for the best estimate scenario with discounted profit only averaging around £2k per annum. Furthermore, the pessimistic scenario would result in a cumulative loss of c. £180k.

In accordance with CHORD governance, this project is being assessed from a business perspective and therefore the NPV analysis cannot be considered without capital costs and depreciation. Therefore, in order for the project to proceed it would be necessary to identify funding sources for the capital cost. Identification of additional income or operational cost savings during the lifecycle of the project will also improve the commercial viability of the project.

Consultation with local stakeholder groups has shown that this project and the Option 2B proposals are broadly supported. It is generally considered that development of the marina project will provide an improvement to the public realm in the harbour area and will lead to greater use and footfall, and therefore, opportunities for new business in the vicinity of the harbour.

Page 71: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 65\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

12 Recommendations Option 2B is recommended as the preferred option on technical and operational grounds. The budget cost estimate for the construction for this option is £2,664,460 excluding VAT.

In order for the project to proceed it will be necessary to identify funding sources to meet the capital cost. Identification of additional income or operational cost savings during the lifecycle of the project will also improve the commercial viability of the project.

Alternatively, cost savings may be achieved by undertaking a value engineering workshop. The workshop attendees should include key stakeholders who have a direct influence in the scheme and harbour operations. Options will be assessed that provide savings in the whole life of the scheme, which may have implications on the operational use of the marina or harbour.

In order to better define and manage the project risks it is recommended that a project risk assessment be undertaken. This will enable the existing ‘optimism bias’ figure of 30% to be refined and greater cost certainty to be provided.

In order to reduce the project risks and provide greater cost certainty the following work should also be undertaken:

geotechnical site investigations, to inform the design of dredging and construction works and enable further sediment contamination testing at depth, to determine the dredging disposal method.

develop the designs further to take account of ground conditions.

undertake Environmental Screening in order to determine if an Environmental Impact Assessment is required

employ a legal review of the Campbeltown Harbour Act to determine the necessary steps to identify if a the proposed construction works are within the jurisdiction of the Harbours Act or whether a Harbour Revision Order is required.

If the project is progressed to Full Business Case, marine and planning consents will be required to progress the project to construction.

Alternative delivery models will also need to be reviewed to identify the ‘best fit’ for the new marina. This could include Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company, Argyll and Bute Council or a new private sector led business.

Page 72: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 66\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

Page 73: Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina · Argyll and Bute Council Campbeltown Loch Marina Technical and Feasibility Report ... operational constraints and the initial business

Campbeltown Loch Marina—Technical and Feasibility Report Hyder Consulting (UK) Limited-2212959 Page 67\\hc-ukr-ex-fs-01\ex_proj\ua utils\ua002297-campbeltownlochmarina\f-reports\5000-ua002297-dvr-04 campbeltown marina feasibility study - final report v1.1).docx

13 References 1. The Yacht Harbour Association Ltd., 2007 A Code of Practise for the Design, Construction

and Operation of Coastal and Inland Marinas and Yacht Harbours.

2. AS3962-2001 Australian Standard, Guideline for Design of Marinas.

3. BS6349-1:2000 British Standard, Maritime structures — Part 1: Code of practice for general criteria

4. Marine Scotland, Food and Environment Protection Act 1985, Part II Deposits in the Sea (as Amended) (FEPA), Draft Guidance for the Sampling and Analysis of Sediment and Dredged Material to be Submitted in Support of Applications For Sea Disposal of Dredged Material, by Marine Scotland, September 2010.

5. Contamination Action Level List, by Marine Scotland, September 2010.

6. Argyll & Bute Council – Campbeltown Options Appraisal, Final Report, by Scott Wilson, April 2008, Ref. S105227

7. Report on Ground Investigation at Campbeltown Harbour, by Norwest Holst Soil Engineering Ltd, Nov, 2000, Ref. F11707.

8. Campbeltown Marina Business Plan, by DTZ, October 2010.

9. Factual Report on Ground Investigations, by Exploration Associates Ltd, February 1995, Ref 134100.

10. Factual Report on Ground Investigation, by Fugro Engineering Services Ltd, January 2005, Ref NEA041006.

11. Campbeltown New Quay Expansion – Consolidated Tender from Structural Soils Ltd, by Scott Wilson, January 2010, Ref S106508.

12. Dive Survey and Seabed Sampling, by Caldive Underwater Contractors, October 2010, Ref CAL/715/10

13. Annual Report and Accounts – Year Ending 2007, 2008 & 2009, by Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company, December 2007, 2008 & 2009, Ref SC 116845

14. Contract Berth Charges, by Campbeltown Loch Berthing Company, April 2010, Ref SC 116845

15. Sailwest Project: A Strategic Programme for the Development of Marine Leisure Activities and Infrastructure in the Republic of Ireland Border Region, Northern Ireland and the West of Scotland, Final Report, November 2007.

16. SEUPB: Addendum to the Economic Appraisal of the Sail West Project, October 2009.

17. Campbeltown Locality Socio-Economic Baseline: Argyll and Bute Council, by EKOS, February 2009.

18. National Renewables Infrastructure Plan, by Scottish Enterprise, Highlands and Islands Enterprise.

19. Marina Development Opportunities in Scotland, by RGA Waterfront Ltd, September 2008.

20. Coast Protection Act 1949: Section 34 Consent – Guidance for Applicants, August 2006.

21. Scottish Enterprise: Sailing tourism in Scotland, Final Report, by Tourism Resources Company, February 2010.