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* GB785663 (A)

Description: GB785663 (A) ? 1957-10-30

Improvements in and relating to the measurement of loose material

Description of GB785663 (A)

COMPLETE SPECIFICATION Improvements in and relating to the Measurement of Loose Material We, BARBER-GREENE COMPANY, a Corporation organised and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Illinois, United States of America, of Aurora, Illinois, Untied States of America, do hereby declare the invention, for which we pray that a patent may be granted to us, and the method by which it is to be performed, to be particularly described in and by the following statement : ; This invention relates to the supply and measurement of loose material, for example, material for mixture with asphalt and the like. The aim of the invention is. to provide a novel and improved measuring system and apparatus. for measuring a predetermined weight of fine loose material from a flowing stream of loose material by determining the volume of the material necessary for a predetermined weight and overflowing the material to the required volume. According to the invention, a method of measuring and supplying loose material comprises the flowing of loose material by gravity to a measuring receptacle to overflow the top thereof, weighing the loose material in the receptacle, varying the volume of the receptacle to contain a required weight of loose material, and thereafter supplying a greater volume of loose material than required to fill the receptacle and flowing the loose material from the top of the receptacle for the succeeding measuring operations. In one way of carrying out our invention, we provide a variable volume measuring bin arranged for weighing a first batch of loose material, such as mineral fines, and having a movable wall for adjusting the volume thereof in accordance with a predetermined weight of fines for mixture with aggregate and asphalt, and provide a conveyor and storage chute for filling the measuring bin together with means for stopping the flow of fines from the storage chute to the measuring bin and also provide a diverting chute for the fines elevated by the conveyor and measure the fines by an overflow chute for the measuring bin allowing the fines to overflow at a uniform level for each measuring operation, all during operation of the elevating conveyor. A specific example of apparatus for carrying out the method of the invention will now be described with reference to accompanying drawings, wherein : Figure 1 is a fragmentary view in side ele vation of an asphalt batch plant constructed in accordance with our invention; Figures 2, 3 and 4 are diagrammatic views diagrammatically illustrating the apparatus and system of our invention; and Figure 5 is a transverse sectional view taken through the weigh hopper and measuring bin shown in Figure 1. In the embodiment of our invention illustrated in the drawings, we have shown in Figure 1 a fragmentary view in side elevation of an asphalt batch plant having a measuring apparatus and system constructed in accordance with our invention embodied therein, in which a weigh hopper 10 is divided into a plurality of compartments forming measuring bins for various sizes of aggregates for mixture with asphalt, and also forming a mineral fines measuring bin 11 for measuring the mineral fines and discharging a measured weight or volume of mineral fines for mixture with asphalt and the aggregate carried in the weight hopper. It should here be understood that while the measuring bin 11 measures mineral fines, that it may also measure aggregate or any other loose material and that the measuring system of our convention is adaptable to measure various kinds of loose material. The weigh hopper 10 is shown as being generally triangular in transverse section with the apex of ! the triangle at the top there- of and arranged in material receiving relation with respect to a storage chute 12, supported thereabove. The storage chute 12 has a re stricted rectangular discharge end 13 for discharging mineral fines into the measuring bin 11 of the weigh hopper 10 under the control of a sliding gate 15, slidably guided for movement along the discharge end portion 13 of the weigh hopper. The sliding gate 15 has an open portion 16 movable in communication with a discharge end portion 13 of the weigh hopper and forming a conduit for the transfer of mineral fines from the supply chute 12 to the measuring bin 11. The sliding gate 13 also has a closure plate 17 disposed rearwardly of the open portion 16 thereof and movable beneath the discharge end portion 13 of the weigh hopper 12, to block the discharge of material from said supply chute. A double acting fluid operated cylinder 19 having a piston rod 20 extensible therefrom is provided to operate the sliding gate 15. As herein shown, the cylinder 19 is supported at its head end on a support bracket 22 and channel 23 extending along the weigh hopper and braced from an inclined wall 24 of a supply bin for aggregate, by a brace 25 extending rearwardly and downwardly from the wall 24. The weigh hopper 10 is supported on parallel spaced beams 26 suspended at opposite ends thereof on parallel spaced beams 27 through suspension linkage connections 28 including parallel torsion bars 29 having operative connection with a scale (not shown). The scale and the suspension connection of the beams 26 to the scale levers are no part of our present invention and may be of various well known forms, so need not herein be shown or described further. Two support beams 30 extend across opposite ends of the weigh hopper 10 and are movable into engagement with the beams 26 to take the weight of the weigh hopper from the scale after an initial batch has been weighed and it is desired to volumetrically measure the next succeeding batches, as will hereinafter more clearly appear as this specs fication proceeds. The beams 30 are shown as extending beneath the beams 26 and are suspended from the beams 27 by adjustable linkages (not shown), adjustable in length to bring the beams 30 up into engagement with the beams 26 to support the weigh hopper free from the scale. The measuring bin 11 of the weigh hopper 10 is shown in Figure 5 as having an inclined side wall 35 extending along one side thereof and on opposite pivoted side wall 36 interleaving a depending wall 37 at the receiving end of the bin and pivotally connected thereto on a hinge pin 39. The wall 36 is moved to a wide open position by means of cylinders 40 pivotally carried at each end of the weigh hopper 10. on brackets 41, connected to end walls 42 of the hopper. The cylinders 40 are pivotally supported on the brackets 41 on pivot pins 43. Piston rods 44 extensible from the cylinders 40 are shown as extending between the end portions of straps 45 extending about and depending from pivoted actuating arms 46 for the pivoted side wall 39. Said piston rods are pivotally connected to said straps by pivot pins 47. The actuating arms 46 are connected together by a connecting arm 49 having a strap 50 secured thereto and extending rearwardly therefrom. The strap 50 has slidable engagement with an arcuate rack 51. The arcuate rack 51 is secured to the pivoted wall 36 adjacent the lower end thereof, and has a stop 53 at its outer end engaged by the arm 49, upon upward pivotal movement thereof, to swing the pivoted side wall 36 about the axis of the hinge pin 39 in an opening direction. A stop 55 is adjustably carried on the rack 51 and abuts a depending leg 56 of the beam or angle 26 extending along the side of the weigh hopper 10 adjacent the pivoted side wall 36, to limit closing movement of said pivoted side wall. The stop 55 includes a worm housing 57 having a worm 59 journaled therein and meshing with the teeth of the rack 51. The worm may be rotated by a crank or the like (not shown) engageable with a squared end of a shaft 6G for said worm. Turning movement of the worm 59 thus varies the position of the stop 55 along the rack 51 and manually opens the pivoted side wall 36 to a required volumetric capacity of the bin 11, for a predetermined weight of mineral fines. The weigh hopper 10 is also provided with a clam shell drop bottom 61 including gates 62 pivoted to opposite sides of said weigh hopper, as by pivot pins 63. The gates 62 are operated by fluid pressure cylinders 64, one of which is secured to each wall of the hopper 10. The cylinders 64 have piston rods 65 extensible therefrom. Each piston rod 65 is connected to a pair of gates 62 through a yoke 66 secured to the lower end thereof. Links 67, pivotally connected to opposite ends of said yoke, connect said piston rods to the inner ends of the gates 62. Thus upon the admission of fluid under pressure to the rod ends of the cylinders 64, the gates 62 will be pivoted into a closed position to retain mineral fines in the bin 11. Upon the admission of fluid under pressure to the head ends of said cylinders the gates 62 will drop for the discharge of mineral fines from the bottom of said weigh hopper. The wall 35 of the weigh hopper 10 is also shown as having an inclined overflow chute 68 extending downwardly and outwardly therefrom from the top thereof for carrying the excess fines back to a storage bin 69 when the sliding gate 15 is closed and the measuring bin 11 has been filled, and thus assuring a uniform volume of fines in the measuring bin 11 for mixture with each batch of asphalt and aggregate The overflow chute 68 has a limit switch (not shown) associated therewith and operated by a pivoted switch arm 70 on the outside of said chute. The switch arm 70 may be actuated by a pivoted vane (not shown) on the inside of said overflow chute. The vane within the overflow chute 68 is moved by the flow of material along said chute to actuate the switch arm 70 to close the limit switch and effect operation of a fluid operated valve (not shown), controlling the admission of fluid under pressure to the head end of the cylinder 19. This will operate the gate 15 to shut off the flow of mineral fines to the mineral fines bin 11, and effect the measuring of fines in said bin by the overflow of fines from said bin along the overflow chute 68. Referring now in particular to Figures 2, 3 and 4, diagrammatically illustrating the fines measuring system of our invention, a hopperlike storage bin 69 is shown as having a converging lower discharge end having communication at its bottom with a screw conveyor 71 within a housing or tube 73. The screw conveyor 71 carries the fines from the storage bin 69 to a boot or housing 74 for a bucket elevator 75. The fines carried to the bottom of the boot 74 are conveyed upwardly by the bucket elevator 75 to a position adjacent the top of the plant and are discharged within a chute 76 having communication with the storage or supply chute 12, for supplying mineral fines to the bin 11. A bypass chute 77 is connected from the discharge chute 76 at the upper end of the storage chute 12 and is connected at its opposite end with the overflow chute 68 adjacent the lower end thereof, for returning excess fines to the storage bin 69 after the storage chute 12 has been filled. The storage chute 12 is of a greater capacity than is necessary for mixture with each batch of asphalt and the conveyor 75 con- tinuously supplying said storage chute with mineral fines assures an ample supply of fines to the measuring bin 11, the volume or weight being maintained constant by flowing the surplus fines through the overflow chute 68, as the sliding gate 15 cuts off the flow of fines from the storage or supply chute 12. In carrying out the measuring operations of the fines for mixture with the aggregate and asphalt for a batch of asphalt the fines bin 11 may be filled to its top by movement of the gate 15 to an open position to accommodate the mineral fines to flow through the open portion 16 of said gate from the supply chute 12. As the mineral fines flow down the overflow chute 68 the gate 15 may be closed by operation of the switch arm 70, effected by the flow of fines along the chute 68. This effects operation of suitable valve means to supply fluid under pressure to the head end of the cylinder 19. The fines in the bin 11 may then be weighed. Where it is found that the fines in the bin 11 are of insufficient weight for a correct mixture, the movable side wall 36 may be moved toward an open position by operation of the worm 59. The additional compartment space may then be filled with fines by movement of the sliding gate 15 to an open position. If the weight is now sufficient after the excess fines have been run off the top of the bin through the overflow chute 68, the volumetric capacity of the bin 11 will be such as to give a correct weight of fines for mixture with each batch of asphalt without further weighing. When the measuring bin 11 has been adjusted to the correct volumetric capacity for a given weight of fines and is empty, it is merely necessary to supply fluid under pressure to the piston rod end of the cylinder 19 and move the sliding gate 15 in position to allow the flow of fines from the supply or storage chute 12 through the open portion 16 of said sliding gate into the bin 11, until the fines overflow downwardly along the overflow chute 68. The sliding gate 15 may then be closed by the supply of fluid under pressure to the head end of the cylinder 19 effected by the switch arm 70 operated by the flow of fines along the overflow chute 68. The fines may then be discharged for mixture with the aggregate and asphalt by open ing of the clam shell discharge gate 61 under control of the fluid pressure cylinders 63, it being understood that opening of the gate 61 opens all of the storage bins of the weigh hopper for the discharge of aggregate with the mineral fines for mixture with the asphalt. During the discharge operation of the mineral fines, the bucket elevator 75 may be continued in operation to elevate the fines conveyed thereto by the screw conveyor 71, and fill the supply or storage chute 12 with a greater volume of fines than is necessary for a next succeeding measuring operation, the excess of fines being returned to the storage bin 69 through the return chute 77. For a next succeeding measuring operation it is merely necessary to open the sliding gate 15 to overfill the measuring bin 11 and then close said gate and allow the bin to level off by the flow of the excess fines downwardly through the overfill chute 68 back to the storage bin 69. The measuring operation may thus be automatically repeated for each batch of asphalt without weighing the fines for each succeeding batch after the mixture of a preceding batch. What we cIaim is.- 1. A method of measuring and supplying loose material comprising the flowing of loose material by gravity to a measuring receptacle to overflow the top thereof, weigh

* GB785664 (A)

Description: GB785664 (A) ? 1957-10-30

Improvements in or relating to means for operating self-regulatingsynchronous generators in parallel

Description of GB785664 (A)

PATENT SPECIFICATION Inventors: ROLF ROSE'EUT ERNST S OHARSTEIN and 'IERMANN HARZ 785664 Date of Applici No 30929/55. Cmplete Spec ation and filing Complete Specification: Oct 28, 1955. ification Published: Oct 30 1957. Index at acceptance:-Class 38 ( 4), A 1 DI. International Classification:-H 02 j. COMPLETE SPECIFICATION Improvements in or relating to means for Operating SelfRegulating Synchronous Generators in Parallel We, 'SIEMENS-ISCHUCKERTWE Ri(E AKTIENGESELLSCHAFT, a German Company, of Berlin and Erlangen, Germany, do hereby declare the invention, for which we pray that a patent may be granted to us, and the method by which, it is to be performed, to be particularly described in and by the following statement: - This invention relates to means for operating self-regulating synchronous' generators in parallel. When two identical self-regulating synchronous generators are operated in parallel with their field windings energised, through rectifiers by current derived from current transformers included in the main phase lines, as in known arrangements, 'difficulties are encountered, due to the fact that the watt-less component of the load current is 'often unevenly distributed between the two machines. On the one hand extremely small deviations in the generator properties or in the adjustment of the characteristic curves are sufficient to interfere appreciably with parallel operation, while on the other hand, with an ideal voltage behaviour of the individual generators and with exactly, the same adjustment of the characteristic curves of all the machines, the watt-less load distribution would be completely indeterminate, which might result in an uncontrollable interchange of watt-less power 'between the generators In such cases the generators might be endangered by overcurrents, or parallel operation might be rendered impossible as a result of the response of the generator protective equipment. According to the present invention there is provided means for operating self-regulating synchronous generators in parallel, the field windings of the generators being energised through rectifiers by currents derived from current transformers connected in the main phase lines, the arrangement being such that, during parallel operation of the generators, (Price 3 s 6 d l not only are the respective output terminals of the generators connected to one another, but the excitation circuits of the individual generators are also electrically connected together in such manner that an increase in the wattless stator current of any one generator will result in an increase in the excitation, of all the generators whereby the desired distribution between the machines of the watt-less component of the load current may be obtained. For a better understanding of the invention and to show how the same may be carried into effect, reference will now be made to the accompanying drawing in which: Figures 1 land 2 are circuit diagrams illustrating two different means for operating two self-regulating synchronous generators in parallel. Referring now to the drawings, in 'Figure 1 two synchronous generators 1 and 100 are arranged' to be driven by motors not shown and to work into common bus-bars 2 The field windings of the generators are excited via excitation leads 10 and'1,000 by direct currents from, bridge-connected rectifiers 3 and 300 Adjustable resistors 12 and, 120 are connected in series with the field windings of the generators The rectifiers are fed by rectifier transformers 4 and 400 of which the primary windings 5 and 500 are connected via impedances 6 and' 600 'to the main phase leads 7 and '700 of the generators The two generators may be connected in parallel by means of a switch 9 which connects the phase leads 7 and 700 together This switch is electrically or mechanically coupled to a further switch 11 which serves to connect together the excitation circuitsl of the two generators so that when the main generator stator windings are parallel-connected', so also are the field, windings. If one of the generators is, when they are parallel-connected as described and supply725,664 ing a load, more strongly excited than the other machine, it supplies a larger share of the total watt-less current demanded by the load A still greater excitation current is then caused to flow through the compounding winding of the rectifier transformer of this machine Since the field windings of the two generators are connected in parallel, this increased current is divided between the two 1 o field windings so that the excitation of both machines is increased and they must both participate in supplying the watt-less current. Corresponding conditions exist when more than, two machines are to be operated in parallel If uniform distribution between the generators of the effective load is desired, this can be attained by suitable adjustment of the governors of the driving machines. The relationships between the field, currents of the individual generators are governed by the impedances of the field circuits Therefore adjustment of the resistors such as 12 and in the field circuits makes it possible to control at will, or according to economic requirements, the field current ratios and hence the apportionment between the individual machines of the watt-less current In some cases where two machines are operated in parallel and it appears from the outset that one particular machine is always to carry a smaller excitation current than the other, it is sufficient to provide only that machine with a controllable resistance in its field circuit. Figure 2 illustrates a preferred embodiment In this case two synchronous generators 21 a and 21 b are driven 'by steam turbines 26 The generators have self-regulating excitation, which is arranged to be dependent upon the main generator current For this purpose current transformers 23 a, 23 b, are providedl, the primary windings of which are fed via inductors 2 Aa and 24 b with a field current component which is either proportional to the generator voltage or is constant, as the case may be A further field current component proportional to the main generator current is also supplied to the primary windings of the current transformers by virtue of the fact that part of their primary windings are connected in series with the respective generator stator windings The two field current components are superimposed one upon another and fed by the secondary windings of the current transformers to the field windings of the generators via rectifiers 22 a and 22 b The inductors 24 a and 24 b are connected together on the side remote from the main bus-bars by means of a conductor 27 With similar machines the voltages at the points of connection are equal and amount to about 20 o% of the main voltage, so that even with unequal direct current excitation voltages, a parallel connection is possible. The result of the parallel connection effected by the conductor 27 is the same as if a parallel connection were to be made between the field circuit leads carrying direct current, that is between the corresponding leads on the direct current sides of the recti 70 fiers 22 a and 22 b This is because nonuniformity of the excitation caused by differences in the load-current-dependent excitation components results in changes in; potential occurring at the two ends of the conductor 75 27 The difference in potential now existing between the two ends of the conductors 27 causes a compensating current to flow through the inductors 24 a and 24 b This in turn has, through current transformers 23 a and 23 b, a 80 compensating effect on the field currents of the generators.

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* GB785665 (A)

Description: GB785665 (A) ? 1957-10-30

Improvements in or relating to seals between a pair of relatively rotatableelements

Description of GB785665 (A)

PATENT SPECIFICATION go Date of application and filing Complete Speciflcation: Dec 7, 1955. No 35126/55. Application made in United States of America on Nov 1, 1955 Complete Specification Published: Oct 30, 1957, Index at acceptance:-Class 122 ( 5), B 13 C 2 E(MA 1: IB), B 13 C 2 F 6). International Classification:-F 06 j. COMPLETE SPECIFICATION Improvements in or relating to Seals between a Pair of Relatively Rotatable Elements We, GI Ts BROS MFG Co, a Corporation organised and existing under and by virtue of the laws of the State of Illinois, United( States of America, of 1,846, South Kilbourn S Avenue, Chicago 23, Illinois, United States of America, do hereby declare the invention, for which we pray that a patent may be granted to us, and the method by which it is to be performed, to be particularly described in and by the following statement: - This invention relates to sealing means for providing a seal between a pair of relatively rotatable elements such as between a shaft and a wall through which the shaft extends. In certain seals of the kind, a seal ring is carried by one element and has a sealing face in a plane transverse to the axis of relative rotation engaging a like face of the other element To provide for relative axial movement of the elements, to compensate for wear of the sealing faces and to Provide tolerances in mounting of the seal assembly, it is necessary to permit relative axial movement between the seal ring and the element which carries the same and it is, of course, necessary to maintain a seal between the ring and the element carrying the same It is usual in these seals for a member of resilient material to be provided for elfecting such a seal. A problem heretofore encountered in connection with such seal assemblies is in the connection of the resilient member to the seal ring and the element from which the ring is supported Another problem in connection with such seals is in the support of the seal ring which is desirably of a lubricating material such as carbon or the like-which materials are generally very brittle The seal ring supports heretofore provided have not been entirely satisfactory in that they tend to break the seal ring and/or do not securely support the same. It is further desirable that the seal be as compact as possible and that the parts be readily and economically manufactured and assembled. The sealing means in accordance with the present invention comprise a seal ring having a sealing face arranged to coact with a like sealing face on one of the relatively rotatable 50 elements, and having surfaces facing in axially opposite directions which are engaged by clamping means carried on a sleeve supporting the seal ring, the clamping means including a member of resilient material 55 urged against at least one of the surfaces of the seal ring and bitingly engaged by an annular edge at points spaced radially outwards a substantial distance from the inner periphery of the seal ring 60 Preferably, the seal ring is made of a lubricating material such as carbon Such materials are very brittle and have little resistance to shearing and tensioning forces as compared to the strength against compres 65 sive forces With the arrangement defined above, the seal ring is securely held without any tendency to cause breakage of the same. It may be noted that it has been proposed to exert holding forces against the inside cylin 70 drical surface of the seal ring to hold the same, but such would tension the ring to result in breakage of the same. Two shaft seals in accordance with the invention will now be described, by way of 75 example, with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which: Figure 1 is a cross-sectional view of a portion of a shaft seal in accordance with the invention: 80 Figures 2 and 3 are sectional views taken along lines II-II and n-IIT of Figure 1; Figure 4 is a sectional view of a portion of another form of seal according to the invention; and 85 Figure 5 is a view corresponding to a portion of Figure 4, on a reduced scale, with the parts being illustrated in different relative positions, to illustrate the flexing action of the diaphragm 90 The shaft seal assembly 10 shown in Figs. 1-3 comprises a cylindrical support shell 11 which is secured within an opening of a wall element 12 through which a shaft 13 extends, the purpose of the seal assembly 10 being to provide a seal between the shaft 13 and the wall element 12 A disk 14 is disposed within the shell 11 and is secured on the shaft 13, preferably through a sealing washer 15 The disk 14 has a sealing face 16 engaged by a sealing face 17 of a seal ring 18 supported from the shell 11 through a diaphragm member 19 of resilient material with a coiled compression spring 20 being provided to urge the sealing face 17 toward the face 16. The diaphragm member 19 comprises a first sleeve portion 21 which is held between a rigid band 22 and the inner cylindrical surface of the shell 11 and a second slcee portion 23 associated withl the seal rine,o The diaphrapm memnber 19 further comprises an intrediate dia-131 irm portion 24 interconnect n' the sleeve portions 21, 23 The dianhram nortion 24 may have a partially folded conficuration as illustrated O o allow maximum axial niovement of tle seal sine lo relative to the s Xlell 11. A prefera le ieturi of the invention r Cs in nal 3 ns the wall of the sleeve o 30 rion 7 Ct substnncia 1 ly greater thicess than tho wall of -1-t e diapbrarn porti 4 S as to fcilhtate imountin G _r thoe sleeve Port'on 21 h 1 e l-in a di r'1 r 1 p ' o 2 onti} 1,:n fle'xi 4 '; t' >' S i T' strated, le of th sl ee e 'crtion '1 Ias a t Pici nes p n-atel w'^ the thic ness of tho wa 11 o the daohlag portion Y-. n nther -oreferable feature o& t 'nvjn ion i 3 in lie pro-ision of an annular flanae porlopn r 5 on the rinid band 22 whi'iiclh exltends radially utwardly -d - e inn lnd -Q-al surface of t sl Sl 1 1 ^' th t lt,,1 i-&on etween tbhe -leere,oriion '1 and ' 2 dia-i-bsa G-n portion 24 of the diaphragm member W 9#ithl -Lhis atale-l ithi diaohram 5 is thus stre-ch-d o -er thle:ave poricn 25 to allow ma' imnmo Ven'a oi the cal rmn in an axial di Lrection relative to tle diao L, er of the assembly. t will be noted chat the jrov si N of the Hle portion 25 's particularly advantageous in combinat 3 ion it'l the reature by "d'clh the sleeve portion 21 has n-11 1 Ackness areatef than that of -the diaphrag-ii portion 24, in that the flange portion 25 does not have to bite into the material in order to securely hold the junction between the sleeve portion 21 and the diaphragm portion 24 aaainst movement. The sleeve portion 23 of the diaohragm member 19 is disposed between a radially inW wardly facing cylindrical surface 26 of the ring 18 and the outer surface of a cylindrical sleeve 27 The sleeve portion 23 could be compressed to such an extent as to securely hold the ring 18 on the sleeve 27 However. such would develop tension in the ring 18 and might easily result in cracking of the same, the ring 18 being of a brittle lubricating material such as carbon -w;hich has little resistance to shearing and tenisioninig forces. Such materials, however, have a relatively 70 highl strengthi, with respect to coinpressional forces and a portion of the ring 18 is hield between an annular fiange 28 of the sleeve 27 and a lvw 9 e, a radiaily exteading poreoi the diaphragm inerabcr i 9 bueine dis 75 sed N the washer I a u ' e seal rina 18. it is of importance that the asher i 9 has a ghtl Ay casled configuration such that an ut'er edge portionl 30 ther-of bites into the 80 n memb'er I at L a niisa ^yaced a s'l't nial oistance from the,i 1,ier suriace 26 of th_ ring 18 With this rrangeaien the Pressure exerted oil the ring, 18 is more unifosrmfly distributed, to exert more uniform 85 coinpression forces on the portion of tho ring 18 disposed betwen the flange 28 and warner 29 it may be noted that the washer 29 and band 22 are preferabiy fcormned by a stminse -operation from a single memiliber, 90 the v -ahr 29 having ail outer dia etr equal CG le in-er d'a'rneter of a flange por'tion 31 on:he nond 22 wvhich is engaged by the splir-g 20 In the stamping operation, the i 9 will ta-e a dished conlfuration as 95 i a 2 d It vwas once thou-ht necessary to shn ile washer 29 out bu it was found -.hat stralialiening was not only not necessary bui Lhai crrenalv improved results were c'5 enh d by using the dished configuration 100 In assetnbly, the washer 29 is shooed on the u''eeve 27 and pressed against the diapihra m memb r 19 A tapered tool is then ns rte-,nto the end of the 5 ''eve 27 toexponci an end portion thereof and move and 105 lock lle wasshtr 29 tightly a Lainst tlhe diaral meineolll 19. to penr rotati N of the rin 18 relativelv to he sleeve 27, the ring 18 is formed with recesses at diametrically opposi e points 1 io to re-eive projections 32 and 33 for' ned by defcrmation of the flange 28 In addition, the min r surfa ce 26 of the ring 18 has recesses 34 and 35 which receive pro ecfions of the sl ve portion 23 of the dia:' raa imember 115 lf 9 t^-e recesses 34 35 bein Gr o: ferably located dia metrically oppos-te pisitions in a line at ri-lht angles to a diametrical line ihroug 'he projections 32 r 33 of the It vo 11 be noted that the sleeve portion 21 of thi dsa' vrailn member 19 has a diarmeter substantially Greater than the s Leeve portion 23 and th c i 1 ed sprin, 20 has a generally conical outline so that it spirals outwardly 125 from a snmall diameter convolution adjacent the sleee no Grtion 23 to a large diameter sleeve portion engaged ith the flanrge 31 adjacent the sleeve portion 21 With this arrangement the parts are in nested relation 130 785,665 illustrates how a large amount of axial movement of the seal ring is possible with the construction of this invention. It should be noted that torque is transinitted between the band 22 and sleeve 27 70 through the spring 20 and the ends of the spring 20 are bent to extend into openings (not sho-vn) in the flange 31 and washer 29. The washer 29 also has openings receiving extensions of the diaphragm member 19 to 75 more securely lock the diaphragm member 19 and ring 18 against rotation relatively thereto.

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* GB785666 (A)

Description: GB785666 (A) ? 1957-10-30

Improvements in or relating to t-slot bolts

Description of GB785666 (A)

A high quality text as facsimile in your desired language may be available amongst the following family members:

BE543795 (A) CH340381 (A) DE1078818 (B) FR1138232 (A) NL95925 (C) US2936667 (A) BE543795 (A) CH340381 (A) DE1078818 (B) FR1138232 (A) NL95925 (C) US2936667 (A) less Translate this text into Tooltip

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PATENT SPECIFICATION 785066 4 'i ffi A d Date of application and filing Complete Specification: Dec 16, 1955. 51 \ S No 36227/55. Application made in Sweden on Jan 7, 1955. \vz 4,V Complete Specification Published: Oct 30, 1957. Index at acceptance:-Class 89 ( 1), A( 1 A: 7). International Classification:-FO 6 b. COMPLETE SPECIFICATION Improvements in or relating to T-Slot Bolts I, ARNE S Iv ERTH THORBERG, of Swedish Nationality, of 12 a, Frejagatan, Svedala, Sweden, do hereby declare the invention, for which I pray that a patent may be granted to me, and the method by which it is to be performed, to be particularly described in and by the following statement: - The present invention relates to T-slot bolts for securing workpieces to face plates or work tables in machine tools. In many cases the workpieces have bolt holes, in which case the T-slot bolts are, of course, disposed in these in so far as, this is possible T-slot bolts of the types known hitherto are, however, unsuitable in such cases, since the bolts have a loose and wobbly fit in the slots due to their loose engagement, which makes it difficult to direct the bolts into the holes, particularly in the case of a large and heavy workpiece in which several bolt holes are provided for the reception of T-slot bolts Another drawback of the known T-slot bolts is that when several workpieces of the same kind are to be worked, the bolts have to be directed anew for each workpiece This directing operation entails great loss of time and is besides risky for the person carrying it out due to the possibility of his fingers becoming jammed. The present invention relates to an improved T-slot bolt and its characteristic feature is that its head has machined plane surfaces so as to be guided against the underside of the flanges forming the T-slot and is provided with at least one through locking screw intended to be applied against the bottom of the T-slot in order to fix the bolt at right angles to the face plate. Thus, the T-slot bolts may be directed by means of a template of the contact surface of the workpiece against the face plate and be fixed in the slots by means of the locking screws disposed in the heads of the bolts, in which case the T-slot bolts can also be used as fixtures for several units of the same kind to be manufactured. lPrice 3 s 6 d l For the better understanding of the invention a preferred form thereof will now be described by way of example with reference to the accompanying drawings SO On the drawings: Fig 1 is an elevation of a T-slot bolt, Fig 2 is a side view of the same bolt, the bolt being fixed in a T-slot by means of locking screws, and 55 Fig 3 is a horizontal projection of the bolt according to Figs 1 and 2. The T-slot bolt shown in Figs 1 to 3 consists as usual of a threaded shank 1 and a parallelepipedic head 2 The head is pro 60 vided on both sides of the shank with a pair of angularly cut-out portions forming on one hand shoulders 3 for contact with the underside of the flanges of the T-slot and on the other a central rib 4 with guiding surfaces on 65 the sides for a sliding fit in the narrow portion of the T-slot. The head is besides elongated in the longitudinal direction of the T-slot and provided with a pair of through locking screws 5, one 70 on each side of the shank, where they are accessible through the opening of the T-slot in order to be tightened against the bottom of the T-slot. When the bolt is to be fixed in the T-slot 75 of a face plate the locking screws are tightened against the bottom of the T-slot, whereby the shoulders 3 of the bolt head are pressed into contact with the corresponding surfaces in the T-slot Because the shoulders 80 are made carefully plane, the bolt will project at right angles from the face plate. The advantage of the invention will be particularly apparent when several workpieces of the same kind are to be worked, 85 since the bolts can be used as fixtures and do not have to be directed more than once. Instead, the workpieces may be directed against the bolts, in which case the latter serve as guide pins Where necessary, the 90 bolts may be provided with bushings fitting the holes in the workpiece Because of the 785,666 lateral guiding in the T-slot, a bolt can also if necessary be removed from the slot and returned to exactlv the same place by means of an abutment block clamped fast in the slot.

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* GB785667 (A)

Description: GB785667 (A) ? 1957-10-30

Organosilicon resins

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The EPO does not accept any responsibility for the accuracy of data and information originating from other authorities than the EPO; in particular, the EPO does not guarantee that they are complete, up-to-date or fit for specific purposes.

PATENT SPECIFICATION Date of Application and filing Complete Specification: Jan 6, 1956. No 567156. Application made in United States of America on Jan 14, 1955. Complete Specification Published: Oct 30, 1957. 785,667 Index at acceptance:-Classes 2 ( 5), R 1 C( 8: 9: 12), R 1 T 2, R 27 KSC( 8: 9: 12), R 27 K 8 (D: E: F); and 2 ( 7), T( 1 BX: 2 X). International Classification:-CO 8 g. COMPLETE SPECIFICATION Organosilicon Resins We, MIDLAND SILI Co NES LIMITED, a British Company, of 19 Upper Brook Street, London, W 1, do hereby declare the invention, for which we pray that a patent may be granted to us, and the method by which it is to be performed, to be particularly described in and by the following statement:- This invention relates to novel resins which are condensation products of certain organoslicon compounds and etherified phenolaldehyde resins. The primary object of this invention is to produce novel resinous compositions having resistance to water deterioration and weathering as well as thermal stability to a degree heretofore unobta Inable with the phenolaldehyde resins employed herein Another object is to provide new resins as coating materials in paints and varnishes. In accordance with this invention a novel resinous composition is prepared consisting essentially of the reaction product of (A) 1 to 99 per cent by weight of the condensation product of ( 1) a lower molecular weight phenolaldehyde resin containing from 3 to 8 phenolic nuclei and ( 2) an alkylene oxide and (B) 1 to 99 per cent by weigbt calculated on the total weight of A + B of an organosilicon compound of the general formula RI Si XSIO 4 _m+n) wherein R is a monovalent hydrocarbon radical or halogenated monovalent hydrocarbon radical, X is a hydrocarbonoxy grqup, hydroxyl radical or halogen atom, N has an average value of from 0 9 to 3 inclusive, m has an average value of from 0 05 to 3 1 inclusive, and the sum of m + N does not exceed 4. The resinous condensation product (A) operable in this invention can be prepared by reacting ( 1) a low molecular weight phenolaldehyde resin with ( 2) an alkylene oxide. The phenol-aldehyde resins, ( 1) above, are well known in the art Such resins are condensation products of a phenol such as phenol, p-cresol, o-cresol, m-cresol, 3 5 xylenol, 2 4 xylenol, p-phenylphenol, p-tertiarybutylphenol, p-tertiaryamylphenol, p-secoctylphenol, p-hydroxyldiphenyl, thymol, carvacrol, and a:-naphthol, with an aldehyde such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, glyoxal, furfural, and a-hydroxyadipaldehyde. The phenol-aldehyde resin can be prepared by any of the well-known methods Acid or alkaline catalysed condensation reactions of phenols and aldehydes are well documented in the art le g, Granger, F S, " Condensation of Phenols with Formaldehyde," Imd. Eng Chem, Vol 24, 442 ( 1932) and Vol 29, pages 860 et seq, 1125 et seq, and 1305 et seq ( 1937)J. It is preferred that the phenol-uldehyde resins be acetone-soluble and in no event should they be advanced to the " C " stage or resite stage The phenol-aldehyde resin should thus be a low-molecular weight resin containing from 3 to 8 phenolic nuclei per molecule and probably having the general formula, for example, OH ON OH -CH 2 i Jj CH 2 wherein it is an integer from 1 to 6 inclusive. The phenol-aldehyde resin is reacted with an alkylene oxide such as ethylene oxide, propylene oxide, or styrene oxide, to produce resins such as, for example, the type having the general formula, HOCH 2 CH 20 OC Hi 2 CH 2 OH 1 OCH 2 CH 20 H Qf f CH 2 Q CH 2 Q lPrice 3 s 6 dffl CO 42 6 d =w 1 "e 1 SM b wherein N has an average value exceeding 3. This type of reaction is well known in the art. The phenol-aldehyde-alkylene oxide reaction product can be further modified by means of a monocarboxylic acid or mixture of such acids Specific examples which are illustrative of the carboxylic acids operative herein include acetic acid, propionic acid, acrylic acid, stearic acid, 2-ethyl-hexoic acid, caproic acid, caprylic acid, capric acid, lauric acid, myristic acid, palmetic acid, arachidic acid, behenic acid, lignoceric acid, lauroleic acid, myristoleic acid, palmitoleic acid, oleic acid, gadoleic acid, erucic acid, ricinoleic acid, linoleic acid, linolenic acid, elaeostearic acid, Micanic acid, arachidonic acid and clupanodonic acid Monocarboxylic acids are found in and employed as linseed oil fatty acids, oiticica oii fatty acids, olive oil fatty acids, palm oil fatty acids, peanut oil fatty acids, soyabean oil fatty acids, tung oil fatty acids and a long list of other well-known, commercially available fatty acids The fatty acids can be added to and reacted with the phenolaldehyde-alkylene oxide reaction product in such proportions that up to 90 per sent of the hydroxyl groups in the etherified resin are condensed by reaction with the fatty acid. In addition, modification can be accomplished with up to 10 per cent by weight calculated on the weight of the etherified phenol-aldehyde resin of a dibasic acid, dibasic acid anhydride, or dibasic acid ester such as for example phthalic, malonic, maleic, fumaric and terephthalic acids and anhydrides and esters thereof. The preparation of the phenol-aldehlyde condensation product and the etherification of said phenol-aldehyde with an alkylene oxide follow standard, well-known procedures The modification of the etherified phenol-aldehyde with either monocarboxylic acids or dibasic acids or their equivalents and mixtures thereof, also follows conventional procedures well known in the art In general, merely admixing the various reactants in any desired order with heating to reflux in any desired solvent and with concurrent agitation, in an inert atmosphere if desired, will serve to form the desired condensation reaction products. The organosilicon compounds which are operative herein can be monomeric organosilanes such as organohalosilanes or organohydrocarbonoxy silanes or silanols or they can be siloxane homo-polymers or copolymers which contain residual halogen, hydrocarbonoxy or hydroxyl groups or combinations of such groups These organosilicon compounds contain an average of from O 9 to 3 inclusive monovalent hydrocarbon radicals and/or halogenated monovalent hydrocarbon radicals attached to each silicon atom by C-Si bonds, and _an average of from 0.05 to 3 1 inclusive hydrocarbonoxy, hydroxy and/or halogen groups per silicon atom attached to said silicon atoms. The organic substituents "R" attached to the silicon atoms can be a monovalent hydro 70 carbon radical, for example, alkyl radicals such as methyl, ethyl butyl and octadecyl; alkenyl radicals such as vinyl and allyl; aryl radicals such as phenyl, naphthyl, and xenyl; alicyclic radicals such as cyclopentyl 75 and cyclohexyl; alkaryl radicals such as tolyl and xylyl; and aralkyl radicals such as benzyl, and/or a halogenated hydrocarbon radical such as tetrafluoroethyl, perifluorovinyl, dichlorophenyl, and o',,-trifluorotolyl R can 80 representacombination of thedefinedradicals. The hydrocarbonoxy radicals attached to the silicon can be saturated or unsaturated radicals such as methoxy, ethoxy, octadecyloxy, vinyloxy, allyloxy, benzyloxy, cycloalipqatic 85 radicals such as cyclopentoxy and cyclohexoxy and aryloxy radicals such, as phenoxy X can represent a combination of such radicals and/or hydroxy groups and/or halogen atoms 90 The organosilicon compounds employed in this invention are well known in the xrt and methods of preparation are well known and extensively documented in the art. It is to be clearly understood that the 95 methods employed to prepare either or both the etherified phenol-aldehyde whether further modified or not and the silicone-etieri9 e-d phenol-aldehyde resins are not critical and any and all means for preparing such 100 resins are contemplated herein The etherified phenol-aldehyde resin and organo silicon compound can be reacted in any proportions from 1 to 99 per cent by weight of said phenol-aldehyde and from 1 to 99 per cent 105 by weight of the organosilicon compound. A wide variety of well-known melamine and/or urea resins can be blended with the resins of this invention to obtain specific characteristics The materials employed and 110 the proportions used will be entirely dependent upon the ultimate properties sought and will be readily apparent to one skilled in the art. The various resin compositions disclosed 115 herein can be cured in any desired manner without departing from tde scope of this invention If desired, metallic drying catalysts such as lead and/or cobalt can be employed. The best method of cure is to heat the 120 resinous cemposition, but air-drying resins are 2 eadily obtainable with the scope of this invention. Thle resins of this invention have many uses including coating composition, insulation, and 125 as paint and varnish ingredients. The following examples illustrate the invention All parts and percentages in the examples are by wei ght unless otherwise specified 130 785,667 785,667 3 EXAMPLE 1. A three neck flask was fitted with an agitator, thermometer, nitrogen feed tube and a condenser modified with a Dean-Stark type water trap Into the flask 456 parts of the condensation product of a phenol-formaldehyde resin and ethylene oxide and 444 parts of soyabean fatty acids were introduced and 2.22 parts of triphenyl phosphite were added to catalyse the reaction and reduce discolouration in the ultimate product The phenol-formaldehyde employed contained an average of 6 phenolic nuclei per molecule and after etherification with ethylene oxide, an average of 6 primary aliphatic hydroxy groups per molecule were present 456 Grams of said resin represents 3 gram equivalents of hydroxyl groups 40 Parts of xylene were added as solvent and for purposes of removing water formed during the reaction by azeotropic distillation A nitrogen sweep was made and the reaction was carried out in a nitrogen atmosphere The reactants were heated to 220 C with agitation over 2 3 hours The reaction mixture was maintained at 220 -235 C for 3 hours after which it was cooled and diluted to 70 per cent of solids in solution with additional xylene The etherified phenol-formaldehyde resin was filtered and the filtrate had an acid number of 0.04, a specific gravity of 0 946, viscosity of a per cent solids solution was 26 3 cs at 250 C., a 0 7 mil film cured in 8 to 10 hours at C, a 1 5 mil film had a flex life of 328 to 341 hours at 1500 C. The etherified phenol-formaldehyde resin prepared above was modified with a silicone resin by adding to a flask fitted as above, 140 parts of said resin solids in 64 parts of xylene to 60 parts of a monophenylsiloxane hydrolysate containing 6 per cent of residual hydroxy groups, in 81 parts of toluene and 55 parts of xylene The reactants were heated to 1500 C in 1 5 hours and volatile constituents stripped off Heating was continued at 1490 -150 C for 3 hours at which point the resin bodied as evidenced by an increase in viscosity The reaction mixture was cooled and diluted to 40 per cent of solids in solution with xylene The resulting resin was hazy but became clear on filtering An excellent, flexible, hard, tough, clear film having very good colour characteristics was formed by casting a film of the resin and curing for 45 minutes at 1500 C. EXAMPLE 2. Employing the equipment and method of Example 1, 456 parts of the etherified phenolformaldehyde resin of Example 1 was modified with 504 parts of dehydrated castor oil fatty acids with 2 52 parts of triphenyl phosphite as a catalyst and 34 parts of xylene as diluent, by heating to 2130 C in 1 5 hours and maintaining the mixture at 2130 C to 2290 C for 3 5 hours The resulting resin was cooled and diluted to 59 per cent of solids with toluene The resin was filtered and a clear resinous product was obtained having an acid number of 0 44 and showing a weight loss of 7 4 per cent after 3 hours at 1350 C 70 Parts of the resin solution prepared above were added to 190 parts of a 52 6 per cent solids in toluene solution of a co-polymeric organosiloxane composed of 29 4 mol per cent of methylphenvlsiloane units, 32 O 75 mol per cent monomethylsiloxane units, 32 6 mol per cent of monophenylsiloxane units, and 6 O mol per cent of diphenylsiloxane units and containing about 4 per cent by weight of residual hydroxyl groups The mix 80 ture of reactants was heated to 1400 C in 40 minutes and 100 parts of naphthyl mineral spirits were added slowly while increasing the temperature to 1750 C in 46 minutes Volatile constituents were removed and the resin 85 cooked at 175 C for 6 minutes at which point the resin bodied and the desired viscosity was attained The resin was cooled and diluted to 45 2 per cent of solids in solution with a mixture containing 2 parts of xylene 90 per part of methyl isobutyl ketone The resulting resin exhibited a weight loss of 5 6 per cent after 3 hours at 135 C The resin cured to a film having excellent properties and characteristics by heating at 150 V C for 10 95 minutes The silicone-modified phenol formaldehyde resin film had much lighter, clearer and more desirable colour characteristics than did the phenol-formaldehyde film prepared in the first step of this example 100 EXAMPLE 3. Employing the process of Example 1, 152 parts of the etherified phenol-formaldehyde resin of Example 1, 168 parts of linseed oil fatty acids and 15 parts of xylene were heated 105 to 2259 C in 2 hours and cooked at 225 2370 C for 1 hour The resulting etherified phenol-formaldehyde resin was cooled to 1300 C and 155 parts of a methylphenylsiloxane containing 10 per cent residual 110 hydroxyl groups were added This addition caused the temperature of the reactants to fall to 1000 C and further heating raised the temperature to 1650 C in 20 minutes The reactants were cooked at 1650 C for 30 minutes 115 and thereafter raised to 186 " C over the succeeding 1 hour at which point the resin had bodied and the desired viscosity was obtained. After cooling, 400 parts of xylene and 55 parts of acetonyl acetone were added The 120 solution was filtered and the filtrate contained 49 per cent of resin solids in solution This resin air-dried within 24 hours to a film exhibiting excellent properties of hardness, colour, clarity and toughness 125 EXAMPLE 4. Equivalent results were obtained when the condensation product of p-cresol and acetaldehyde, or 3,5-xylenol and furfural, or pphenyl phenol and glyoxal, or p-sec octyl 130 785,667 4: 785 667 phenol and a-hydroxy-adipaldelhyde were substituted for the phenol-formaldehyde condensation product of Example 1. EXAMPLE 5. Equivalent results were obtained when c'hlorophenylvinlyldimethoxysilane or dimethyldichlorosilarne or cctadecyl-triphenoysilane are employed in the process of Example 1. EXAMPLE 6. Employing the equipment and process of Example 1, 76 parts of the etherified phenolformaldehyde resin of Example 1 and 136 5 parts of phenylmeihyldimethoxysilane were added to 252 parts of butyrolactone A clear solution resulted and was heated to 2000 C. over 3 hours and 50 minutes During the succeeding 25 minutes, the reaction mixture was cooled at 2000 C and 44 parts of the phienylmretlyldimethoxysilane were distilled over At this time, the resin bodied and the viscosity reached the desired point 200 Parts of butyrolactone were added as diluent and a clear resin solution resulted A film of this resin cured at 150 C within 1 hour to produce a hard, flexible film having excellent colour characteristics The cured resin film retained its excellent colour when heated to 2500 C for 2 hours.

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