2009 Easter Jeep Safari Vehicle...

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MOAB JEEP SAFARI 2009 59 The Red Rock 4 Wheelers wish to clarify the eligibility of differing vehicles for the 2009 events, both Easter Jeep Safari and the Labor Day Event. These events are offered for street legal production type four wheel drive full size passenger vehicles that feature a transfer case which has a low range gear in it. Our events are designed around this type vehicle and always have been. Years ago we found out the hard way that allowing vehicles that differed from this formula created problems and detracted from the fun for participants. Out trails also usually end at a different spot than where they began, so street legality is an issue too. This should not in any way be viewed as a condemnation of sand rails, dune buggies, rock crawlers, motorcycles, ATVs, or UTVs. All represent a legitimate way to have fun off the pavement, and many of our members own them, but we realize also that they travel the trails at a much different pace than the full sized four wheel vehicles. It is the travel pace that surfaces as the most visual problem; gaps begin forming in the line as the terrain changes and people speed up or slow down to adjust to it. Once the gaps begin to grow, invariably someone misses a turn and part of the group gets lost. This results in a lot of down time while the lost group is searched for and then reunited with the trail group. Another problem with the disparity of vehicles is the availability of adequate help in the case of a rollover or a serious “stuck”. Winches are marketed for the size vehicle they are expected to be used on, and rated accordingly; a small winch on 2009 Easter Jeep Safari Vehicle Requirements an ATV just doesn’t have the pulling power and vehicle mass required to assist with the larger stuff. What can owners of these other vehicles do if they want to attend an event? Joining or forming a club of similar vehicles is a good choice. That’s how we got started! Another choice that exists for some is attending an organized event for that type of vehicle. Moab features a UTV Rally in the spring now. This year the dates are May 13-16. Find out about it at www.utvrally.com. Monticello and Richfield host ATV events. There are two Utah ATV events we are aware of. The San Juan ATV Safari is held in September in Monticello; information is found at www. sanjuansafari.com. The Rocky Mountain ATV Jamboree held in Richfield, September 14-19 2009, information is at www.atvjam. com. Motorcycle information can be found at www.motoutah.com, and dune buggies can get information at www.dune-buggy. com. Rock crawlers seem to be pretty well covered at www.pirate4x4.com. Another problem we frequently encounter is questions about purpose built rock crawling rigs. All but a couple of our trails are no challenge for these purpose built rigs, so they don’t register for them. Since we do encounter them on a couple of trails we must visit the issue. First, our initial statement stands, the trips are for street legal production type four wheel vehicles. As already mentioned, most of our trails exit at a different point than where they enter, so it becomes difficult to get past the street legal aspect. The Utah Highway Patrol enforces the Utah street legality situation pretty strictly, and Jeep Safari time is no exception. Please note that even if you have your vehicle licensed in another state, Utah laws apply in Utah. The safety inspection book is lengthy but pretty straightforward. It can be viewed or downloaded from www.safetyinspections.utah.gov . On the right sidebar, under quick downloads the passenger car and light truck manual can be found. Windshields, lift height, and fender coverage of the tires are a few of the items of concern, but by no means all. Red Rock 4 Wheelers didn’t make the laws, and we don’t want to be in the business of enforcing them. We ask that you read the requirements of our events, and comply with them. If you, as a participant, are stopped on the way to a meeting place or on the way to the trailhead, we are not responsible if you miss the trip, and will not issue a refund for the missed trail. We are sorry we have to limit our organized runs to a specific type of vehicle, but we have found through experience that we have to. Our rules have developed through the years, not because we like making them, but because we have found they are necessary to preserve the enjoyment of the majority of participants. How to know if you can ride on a road: Quote: From Utah State Senate Bill #181 Effective October 1, 2008 (1) (a) Except as provided in Subsection (1)(b), an all-terrain type I or type II vehicle that meets the requirements of this section may be operated as a street-legal ATV on a street or highway that is a highway with one lane in each direction. (b) Unless a street or highway is designated as open for street-legal ATV use by the controlling highway authority in accordance with Section 41-22-10.5, a person may not operate a street-legal ATV on a street or highway in accordance with Subsection (1)(a) if the highway is under the jurisdiction of: (i) a county of the first class; (ii) a municipality that is within a county of the first class; or (iii) a municipality with a population of 7,500 or more people. So get your OHV registered and inspected and you can ride it on any road with one lane in each direction. So no freeways. No multi-lane highways. Just because a road has a multi-lane section going up a hill does not make it a multi-lane road. The roads inside counties or cities in counties of “first class” status are CLOSED UNLESS the “Controlling Highway Authority” says its okay. Expect to see signs to this effect or you should assume its closed. Only Salt Lake County is a “first class” county. If you want OHV routes in Salt Lake County you’ll need to work on it locally.

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  • MOAB JEEP SAFARI 2009 59

    The Red Rock 4 Wheelers wish to clarify the eligibility of differing vehicles for the 2009 events, both Easter Jeep Safari and the Labor Day Event. These events are offered for street legal production type four wheel drive full size passenger vehicles that feature a transfer case which has a low range gear in it. Our events are designed around this type vehicle and always have been. Years ago we found out the hard way that allowing vehicles that differed from this formula created problems and detracted from the fun for participants. Out trails also usually end at a different spot than where they began, so street legality is an issue too. This should not in any way be viewed as a condemnation of sand rails, dune buggies, rock crawlers, motorcycles, ATVs, or UTVs. All represent a legitimate way to have fun off the pavement, and many of our members own them, but we realize also that they travel the trails at a much different pace than the full sized four wheel vehicles. It is the travel pace that surfaces as the most visual problem; gaps begin forming in the line as the terrain changes and people speed up or slow down to adjust to it. Once the gaps begin to grow, invariably someone misses a turn and part of the group gets lost. This results in a lot of down time while the lost group is searched for and then reunited with the trail group. Another problem with the disparity of vehicles is the availability of adequate help in the case of a rollover or a serious “stuck”. Winches are marketed for the size vehicle they are expected to be used on, and rated accordingly; a small winch on

    2009 Easter Jeep Safari Vehicle Requirementsan ATV just doesn’t have the pulling power and vehicle mass required to assist with the larger stuff. What can owners of these other vehicles do if they want to attend an event? Joining or forming a club of similar vehicles is a good choice. That’s how we got started! Another choice that exists for some is attending an organized event for that type of vehicle. Moab features a UTV Rally in the spring now. This year the dates are May 13-16. Find out about it at www.utvrally.com. Monticello and Richfield host ATV events. There are two Utah ATV events we are aware of. The San Juan ATV Safari is held in September in Monticello; information is found at www.sanjuansafari.com. The Rocky Mountain ATV Jamboree held in Richfield, September 14-19 2009, information is at www.atvjam.com. Motorcycle information can be found at www.motoutah.com, and dune buggies can get information at www.dune-buggy.com. Rock crawlers seem to be pretty well covered at www.pirate4x4.com. Another problem we frequently encounter is questions about purpose built rock crawling rigs. All but a couple of our trails are no challenge for these purpose built rigs, so they don’t register for them. Since we do encounter them on a couple of trails we must visit the issue. First, our initial statement stands, the trips are for street legal production type four wheel vehicles. As already mentioned, most of our trails exit at a different point than where they enter, so it becomes difficult to get past the street legal aspect. The Utah Highway Patrol

    enforces the Utah street legality situation pretty strictly, and Jeep Safari time is no exception. Please note that even if you have your vehicle licensed in another state, Utah laws apply in Utah. The safety inspection book is lengthy but pretty straightforward. It can be viewed or downloaded from www.safetyinspections.utah.gov. On the right sidebar, under quick downloads the passenger car and light truck manual can be found. Windshields, lift height, and fender coverage of the tires are a few of the items of concern, but by no means all. Red Rock 4 Wheelers didn’t make the laws, and we don’t want to be in the business of enforcing

    them. We ask that you read the requirements of our events, and comply with them. If you, as a participant, are stopped on the way to a meeting place or on the way to the trailhead, we are not responsible if you miss the trip, and will not issue a refund for the missed trail. We are sorry we have to limit our organized runs to a specific type of vehicle, but we have found through experience that we have to. Our rules have developed through the years, not because we like making them, but because we have found they are necessary to preserve the enjoyment of the majority of participants.

    How to know if you can ride on a road: Quote: From Utah State Senate Bill #181 Effective October 1, 2008 (1) (a) Except as provided in Subsection (1)(b), an all-terrain type I or type II vehicle that meets the requirements of this section may be operated as a street-legal ATV on a street or highway that is a highway with one lane in each direction. (b) Unless a street or highway is designated as open for street-legal ATV use by the controlling highway authority in accordance with Section 41-22-10.5, a person may not operate a street-legal ATV on a street or highway in accordance with Subsection (1)(a) if the highway is under the jurisdiction of: (i) a county of the first class; (ii) a municipality that is within a county of the first class; or (iii) a municipality with a population of 7,500 or more people. So get your OHV registered and inspected and you can ride it on any road with one lane in each direction. So no freeways. No multi-lane highways. Just because a road has a multi-lane section going up a hill does not make it a multi-lane road. The roads inside counties or cities in counties of “first class” status are CLOSED UNLESS the “Controlling Highway Authority” says its okay. Expect to see signs to this effect or you should assume its closed. Only Salt Lake County is a “first class” county. If you want OHV routes in Salt Lake County you’ll need to work on it locally.

    http://www.utvrally.comhttp://www.sanjuansafari.comhttp://www.sanjuansafari.comhttp://www.atvjam.comhttp://www.atvjam.comhttp://www.motoutah.comhttp://www.dune-buggy.comhttp://www.dune-buggy.comhttp://www.pirate4x4.comhttp://www.safetyinspections.utah.gov